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Posted 04/15/21
The new DJI Air 2S is here! Featuring a powerful imaging system that includes a 1" CMOS sensor, all-new autonomous functions, as well as the ultralight design for which the Mavic Air series is known, the Air 2S appears to be the total package. It’s portable. It’s powerful. And if you’re an aerial photographer looking for the perfect all-in-one drone, the Air 2S might just be it. Super-Sized Sensor Although it shares the same family name as the Mavic Air 2, the Air 2S appears to be a significant upgrade over its predecessor. Chief among its enhancements is the new 1" CMOS sensor, which allows the Air 2S to shoot 5.4K30 and 4K60 video, as well as 20MP stills. The new sensor also supports many advanced imaging features, such as 10-bit color and RAW format photos, as well as several proprietary capture modes, including Intelligent HDR, Hyperlapse, and Panorama. Updates Galore In addition to the powerful new sensor, the Air 2S also includes the latest versions of several features and functions, including the newly released OcuSync 3.0, Active Track 4.0, and MasterShots—to name a few. OcuSync 3.0—or O3 as DJI calls it—is the latest iteration of DJI’s advanced image-transmission system. O3 recently made its debut with the DJI FPV drone, providing the reliably smooth images and ultra-low latency FPV flying requires. That same technology is available with the Air 2S, meaning it can consistently transmit clear, ultra-smooth 1080p footage from up to seven and a half miles away. DJI calls the new MasterShots feature the “next evolution of QuickShots,” the popular autonomous shooting feature that allows pilots to capture cinema-worthy footage with the single press of a button. The number of available QuickShots has grown over the years—from the original four we saw with the DJI Spark to the 10 now available in the DJI Air 2S. And with the increase in number came an increase in sophistication, image quality, etc. Hence, they are now “MasterShots.” Y’All Know Me, Still the Same Low g Of course, it wouldn’t be a Mavic Air if it wasn’t ridiculously lightweight. And despite the powerful new sensor, the Air 2S still weighs a mere 595g. That’s less than 30g heavier than the Mavic Air 2, despite having a camera several weight classes above it. Bottom line: You get all the convenience and portability of the Mavic Air 2, only with a better camera, better autonomous functions, and more advanced features. And with the  Air 2S Fly More Combo, you'll get essential accessories to complete the package and fly longer. Share your thoughts about the new DJI Air 2S, down below, in the Comments section.
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Posted 04/14/21
Doug Guerra puts the HP Reverb G2 to the test in this hands-on review. This VR headset boasts 4320 x 2160 total resolution, dual 2.89" LCD screens, 90 Hz refresh rate, 114° field of view, and more. What are your thoughts on this virtual reality headset? Tell us about them or ask us questions in the Comments section, just below.
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Posted 04/06/21
Jake Estes and Bobby Sansivero test the ARRI Orbiter, an LED light with a processor that's four times faster than the SkyPanel. This cinema light features a wide range of color features, a 2000 to 20,000K color-temperature range, the ability to save up to 240 favorites, and much more. Watch this video, then read more about the Orbiter. Would you add it to your cinematic lighting setup? Let us know your thoughts in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 03/18/21
Having a small space doesn’t mean you can’t have a great YouTube studio setup. Matt shows you how to create a video studio at home with a limited space, from camera gear to the set up itself. What are you doing in your own home studio setup? We hope you benefited and been inspired by watching this video. Feel free to stop by and view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at BandH.com. And don't forget to leave any questions, comments, or explain your own home studio setup in the Comments section!
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Posted 03/17/21
Canon has never been one to sit out an opportunity to enter new markets, and during the past year, a need has manifested itself in the world for remotely controlled, networked cameras to create high-quality broadcast productions with minimal staff and crew over the Internet, from just about anywhere. To meet the requirements of the times, Canon has just announced a new line of 4K PTZ cameras, including the CR-N300 and CR-N500, as well as the new RC-IP100 PTZ camera joystick controller. Each camera fits the needs of specific production styles and features NDI|HX compatibility, high-resolution sensors, UHD 4K video capture, as well as a variety of remote control options for easy, remote pan/tilt/zoom operation. These cameras fall into a lower price range in comparison to other Canon and PTZ camera categories and specs, so they may be worth a side-by-side look. The CR-N500 will be the first to be released, with the more serious specs of the two cameras, to fit into applications that might have more cinematic requirements to match other Canon cinema cameras in your production, and you might need an additional remotely controlled camera to match your color and depth of field. The features include: Canon’s 1" CMOS sensor with Dual Pixel autofocus Canon’s DIGIC DV6 processor UHD 4K30 and 1080p60 video output via HDMI and 3G-SDI Built-in NDI|HX support Wide dynamic range Sensitivity to 1.5 lux Built-in ND filters Scene modes PoE+ for direct power Serial, IR, and IP (wired or Wi-Fi) control Professional gamma support, such as Canon Log3, to make post-production camera matching and color correction a breeze 15x zoom (25.5-382.5mm 35mm equivalent focal length) offers a highly adjustable field of view Genlock Dual XLR inputs and a mini mic input jack to fit right into a professional production The NDI|HX high-resolution/low-bandwidth compression is ideal to drop right into a professional NDI broadcast environment, with minimal configuration. The advantage of this is that many PTZ cameras on the market require a separate purchase for NDI functionality, but the license is included with these Canon PTZ cameras. If you are not using NDI, the camera can also stream over a LAN using RTP/RTMP/RTSP protocols. Another professional feature is the inclusion of built-in ND filters, mostly unheard of in today’s PTZ camera design, and the N500 includes 1/4, 1/16, and 1/64 filters. You can also power the camera via PoE+ so you can cut down on cabling on your existing PoE+ supported LAN. To remotely control the camera, you have several choices, including Canon’s IP/serial controller, IR, RS-422 serial, or via Wi-Fi using Canon’s freely downloadable camera control software. Up next is the  RC-IP100 camera joystick controller, which provides an easy way for a single operator to control multiple cameras. The controller’s bright 7" touchscreen, along with a precision joystick, provides the ability to control up to 100 PTZ cameras. It supports the Canon IP protocol, a proprietary IP protocol that allows you to create a fast, private network to control your cameras, or you can utilize RS-422 serial protocol to connect to the cameras. The controller features six customizable function buttons and stores up to 100 presets, and the joystick allows for fine control of pan, tilt, and zoom for smooth camera movements. The following table provides a spec comparison between the new PTZ cameras and Canon camcorders: CR-N300 PTZ XA40 Camcorder CR-N500 PTZ XF705 Camcorder Sensor 1/2.3" CMOS 1/2.3" CMOS 1" CMOS 1" CMOS Zoom 20x 20x 15x 15x Format UHD 4K30, 1080p60 UHD 4K30, 1080p60 UHD 4K30, 1080p60 UHD 4K60, 1080p60 Outputs USB, 3G-SDI, HDMI Mini-HDMI 3G-SDI, HDMI 12G-SDI, HDMI Control IP, IR, RS-422, UVC, Wi-Fi n/a IP, IR, R-422, Wi-Fi RS-422, Wi-Fi NDI|HX Yes, License Included n/a Yes, License Included n/a ND Filters n/a Optional on Lens Clear, 1/4, 1/16, 1/64 Clear, 1/4, 1/16, 1/64 Gamma n/a n/a Wide DR, CLog3, HLG Wide DR, CLog3, HLG Inputs Audio Mini Jack Mini Jack + 2 x XLR Mini Jack + 2 x XLR Mini Jack + 2 x XLR Recording Output Only 2 x SD Slots Output Only 2 x SD Slots Power PoE+ Battery or DC PoE+ Battery or DC Genlock n/a n/a Yes Yes Last, and available in Q3 2021, is the CR-N300 PTZ camera that falls into a more accessible category, aimed at houses of worship, corporate conferencing, event spaces, broadcast, government, streaming, or documentary-style productions. It shares the same IR, RS-422, Wi-Fi, compatibility with Canon’s IP controller, DIGIC DV6 processor, wide dynamic range, NDI|HX support, PoE+, and scene modes as the CR-N500, but its features are focused on ease-of-use and affordability. The N300 features include: A 1/2.3" CMOS sensor with Dual Pixel AF Canon’s DIGIC DV6 processor Wide dynamic range 1.5 lux 20x optical zoom (29.3-601mm 35mm equivalent focal length) Support for UHD 4K30 and 1080p60 video capture NDI|HX support Scene modes PoE+ Serial, IR, and IP (wired or Wi-Fi) control In addition to IP, HDMI, and 3G-SDI outputs, it also features a USB Type-C output with UVC support so you can utilize it as a tethered webcam There are no XLR inputs, but it does feature microphone input using with a mini jack Both cameras will be available in Satin Black and Titanium White finishes, and they are compatible with the Canon camera control software that is free to download. It allows you to see a 9 x 9 live view grid of your cameras, control your camera, change settings on multiple cameras, view tally information, and load settings configurations from an external drive. It is compatible with Windows OS as well as USB joysticks. Be sure to check out the newest Canon PTZ offerings on the B&H Photo website to compare their specs and features side-by-side, and we’ll keep an eye out for their release dates. Are you excited by these new releases? Feel free to tell us why in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 03/12/21
Cinematographer Shane Hurlbut really lights up a room, literally! In this video, he takes you step-by-step through his process, covering topics such as which types of lights to use for foreground and background, adding color, and best placement of equipment, as he shares his cinematography techniques and tips for lighting a room. Share your takeaways from this video, along with your own tips and tricks for lighting a room, in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 03/02/21
Today, after months of anticipation, DJI unveiled its first-ever FPV drone: the DJI FPV. The official reveal comes almost a year after the rumors about the alleged first-person flyer began circulating through the Internet. Based on today's announcement, the wait appears to have been worth it. Not only is DJI's newest drone a high-speed, low-latency FPV racer, it also functions as a conventional flyer and aerial imager capable of shooting hi-res pictures and video up to 4K60. In other words, today, DJI didn't just announce a new drone. It announced a new drone category: the FPV hybrid. DJI FPV at a Glance Today's announcement gave us a lot to talk about, but for anyone who's interested in just the top-level specs and features, here are some of the highlights at a glance. As you read through the list, feel free to reference our FPV glossary if you a come across a word, phrase, or acronym you would like to know more about. General Features: Flight speed up to 87 mph Flight time up to 20 minutes Transmits video from up to 6.2 miles away 3 different flight modes (S, N, and M) for 3 different types of flight Obstacle sensing (available in N mode) Emergency brake and hover safeguard Modular design with replaceable gimbal, landing gear, and top shell FPV Features: 2 different FPV modes (Low-Latency and High-Quality) Less than 28ms of video transmission latency in Low-Latency mode 150° "Super Wide Angle" FOV (field of view) Acro (M) and self-leveling (S & N) modes available Supports DJI Goggles V2 and other select third-party headsets Supports new DJI Motion Controller for more intuitive FPV flight experience Aerial Imaging Features: 1/2.3" CMOS sensor Records 4K60 video Captures 3840 x 2160 still images RockSteady EIS (electronic image stabilization) Up to 120 Mbps bit rate Supports H.264 and H.265 video formats What's the Big Deal? It's hard to oversell the importance of today's announcement. Obviously, any time the Number One maker of anything builds something new, it's important. DJI is the Number One drone maker in the world, so whenever it announces a new product, that automatically makes it a big deal. But what makes this particular announcement even more impactful is that A) It shows that DJI is committed to growing its FPV catalog and B) It makes FPV flying much more accessible. OK, but How? So, here's the thing: FPV flying isn't easy. It requires more skill and technical understanding than any other type of flying. FPV racers, for example, have to know certain design specifics like the differences between brushed and brushless motors, what a PDB does, or whether they should install individual ESCs or go with a 4-in-1 stack. And that's just on the knowledge side of things. Actual FPV flying is even more demanding. True story: The first time I flew an FPV drone, I banked so hard that I literally fell out of my chair—that's how immersive FPV flying can be. The point is this: FPV flying is kind of a lot. It's intimidating. At first, it's not easy. And because of all the extra components and specialized equipment (and, yes, repairs), it can be more costly. Put those challenges together and you have a fairly sizable barrier to entry. Often, people don't take up FPV because there are too many obstacles in the way. Until now. One of the reasons the DJI FPV is such a big deal is because it effectively removes those barriers and concerns. Are you intimidated by all the moving parts and pieces commonly associated with an FPV system? That is totally understandable and totally no longer an issue. The DJI FPV "Fly More Combo" comes with everything you need to start true FPV flying (including FPV Goggles) right out of the box. Nothing to build, assemble, or solder. Are you worried about the degree of difficulty? Don't be. The DJI FPV comes with three different flight modes: M, S, and N. Both S and N modes feature specific safety protocols that will allow first-time pilots to get the hang of FPV flying. On top of that, DJI has introduced an emergency brake-and-hover feature that automatically stops the craft and returns it to a neutral hover. This one-button failsafe is available in all three flight modes, so even if you're flying in acro (S mode), you can "pull" the e-brake at any time to bail yourself out. Do you have commitment issues? The reason I waited so long to get into FPV flying is because I was afraid I wouldn't like it as much as regular flying, and then I'd be stuck with all this FPV equipment I never used, including my drone, which wasn't much use to me outside of a bando. But with the DJI FPV, you don't have to worry about that. The DJI FPV is a true hybrid, which means it isn't relegated to just one function. Yes, you can use it for high-speed, first-person thrills, but you can also take off the FPV goggles and leisurely soar through the sky using good ol' third-person perspective. Or you can use it to capture incredible aerial photographs and up to 4K60 video—which is something you just can't do with other FPV drones. In other words, you don't have to worry about getting the FPV and then not using it, because it basically does everything. And that's a very big deal. Motion Commotion In addition to the FPV drone, DJI also announced its new Motion Controller, which might be an even bigger deal than the first-person flyer. If you're wondering how that's possible, I invite you to look at this thing: Folks, this is a brand-new design—not just a new controller, a new controller design, with new, gesture-based functionality that allows you to control pitch, roll, and yaw simply by moving your hand. Goodbye stick input. Adios need for opposable thumbs. I now fly only by waving my hand around like a magician. Seriously, this is so cool I'm not sure I care how well it works. I hope it does work well. I hope it's as awesome as it appears. But even if it's not, this is still a revolutionary idea, and the fact that DJI is willing to push the envelope and try out new designs like this is really exciting. Yeah, but Is It Good? Based on what we saw today, there are plenty of reasons to believe the DJI FPV drone will be an absolute game changer. It comes with a lot of hats: racer, aerial cinematographer, hobbyist, etc. And on paper, it looks like it can do just about everything you'd want from a drone. But we've only just now seen this thing. We haven't tested it. We haven't flown it in the wild or used the 4K camera. There's a lot that can happen between the spec sheet and an airfield. So, with that in mind, we will say that while the new DJI FPV does indeed look incredible, we can't be certain how good it really is until we've tested it ourselves—which we will, very soon. Are you as excited by DJI's announcement as we are? Ready to take the leap into FPV? Share your thoughts with us in the Comments section, below. The DJI FPV is intended for customers who have previous experience flying drones. For pilots who do not have FPV experience, it is highly recommended they fly in either S or N mode. Only pilots who are experienced with FPV flying should attempt to fly the DJI FPV in M mode, which relies solely on manual stick input and does not offer any kind of obstacle avoidance, self-leveling, or automatic safeguard. Please always fly according to local laws and regulations.
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Posted 02/23/21
Emphasizing compactness, Sony's FX3 Cinema Camera is the latest take on blurring the lines between Sony's Cinema and Alpha lines of cameras, marrying the top-end video capabilities of the FX cameras with a portable, handheld-optimized form factor like the a7S III. As a camera straddling the lines of capability and versatility, the FX3 takes some of the most coveted features from both to make the ideal camera for solo shooters, for travel needs, for use as a B-camera on high-end shoots, or simply as the main camera for filmmakers who treasure the idea of a sleek and well-spec'd full-frame cinema camera. Correction: The Sony ECM-XM1 Microphone is not included. Sony FX3 Full-Frame Cinema Camera What Is It? Covering the imaging tech, the FX3 has a familiar set of features, which is honestly fine because it's complementing two lines that have just been marked by homeruns in terms of imaging assets. • Just like the a7S III, the FX3 features Sony's full-frame 12.1MP Exmor R BSI CMOS sensor and BIONZ XR processor. This sensor-processor combination gives you that desirable "full-frame look" along with 15+ stops of dynamic range, impressive write speeds to help limit rolling shutter, ISO 80-102400 sensitivity that can expand to ISO 409600, and the BSI design limits noise and promotes clarity for low-light shooting. • UHD 4K recording up to 120p using the full-frame recording area, as well as Full HD shooting at 240p within a Super 35mm area. • Internal 10-bit 4:2:2 recording to CFexpress Type A or SD memory cards. Recording externally, via the full-size HDMI port, 16-bit raw output is possible along with 10-bit 4:2:2 recording, too. • XAVC HS codec uses H.265 encoding to retain detail at smaller bitrates while the XAVC S-I ALL-I H.264 codec supports recording up to 600 Mb/s. • S-Cinetone support for distinct film-like colors and matching to VENICE, FX9, and FX6 sources, or even a7S III or Alpha 1 cameras. Also, S-Log3/2 gamut support and 10-bit HLG for simple HDR productions. • Fast Hybrid AF, which uses 627 points covering approximately 89% of the image frame, is a feature well known to Alpha-series users and also affords Eye AF, Eye and Face Detection, and subject-tracking capabilities. • Built-in cooling fan and heat-dissipating design for uninterrupted recording up to 4K 60. • Weather-sealed body features a magnesium-alloy chassis, stainless-steel components, and an anti-dust system to reinforce working outdoors further. • USB Type-C port for in-camera battery charging or power delivery via an external battery pack. • Same NP-FZ100 battery as the a7S III; however, offers more efficient performance for 1.6x longer battery life. The core specs are great, and what you'd expect from a camera of this class. The FX3 relies heavily on the well-regarded a7S III capabilities, but with a bit more emphasis on just video rather than catering to photo users. So, What's Unique About It? The design. The FX3 is distinct because of how it looks, how it feels, and how it operates. While it borrows a bit from the FX6 in terms of imaging, it leans more into its video-oriented nook with regard to operation and handling. • It's compact! Measuring roughly 5 x 3 x 3", it's about the same size as the a7-series of cameras but sheds the viewfinder hump for a more streamlined and minimal rectangular shape. There's still a large right-hand grip for handheld shooting, and the touchscreen 3.0" LCD flips out to the side and tilts for working from high and low angles. • As a camera meant for handheld shooting, it features the Alpha series 5-axis image stabilization, which offers an Active mode to help steady shots when walking, even without a gimbal. • Catalyst Prepare/Browse software can use the "shake metadata" to help compensate for shake and realign footage during post. • Included removable handle attaches via the Multi-Interface Shoe and makes it easier to shoot handheld from low angles. • Newly designed body is specifically meant to be used without a cage; it features five ¼"-20 mounts for direct accessory attachment, as well as three more threaded mounts on the handle. • While the physical exposure controls match Cinema Line cameras, and it includes direct dials for adjusting Iris, ISO, and Shutter settings, along with integrated zoom adjustment and a tally lamp, the menu system is taken from the a7S III for intuitive navigation. • The removable handle incorporates dual XLR/TRS connectors to make use of the four-channel, 24-bit digital audio interface. The body itself also has 3.5mm ports for a mic and headphones. • Wireless connectivity using 2.4 or 5 GHz speeds, along with 2x2 MIMO support, for mobile tethering. Also compatible with optional USB Type-C to Ethernet adapter. The FX3 feels inspired by the Alpha series, because it's a camera that's more at home in the hand rather than atop a tripod in the studio. It's something that's meant to be used outdoors, on the go, and it has the feature set to complement this type of shooting. FX3 versus a7S III Anyone considering the FX3 may also be thinking to themselves, "How does it differ from the a7S III?" The two are fairly similar in many ways but are apparently targeting different imaging sectors. According to Sony, the a7S III is still very much a photo and video camera, whereas the FX3 is a cinema camera that can shoot stills in a pinch. More than just a twist of words, the FX3 is deliberately lacking some of the photo assets to make room for more video operability. Whereas the a7S III has the built-in EVF, and the characteristic viewfinder "hump," the FX3 opts for a more minimal and functional rectangular profile with purpose-built design elements, including multiple ¼"-20 mounts on the body and a removable top handle that slots into the Multi-Interface Shoe for improved audio and low-angle ergonomics. FX3 Cinema Camera a7S III Mirrorless Camera 12.1MP Full-Frame Exmor R BSI CMOS Sensor BIONZ XR Processor Sensor and Processor 12.1MP Full-Frame Exmor R BSI CMOS Sensor BIONZ XR Processor FF: UHD 4K 120p S35: FHD 240p Video Resolution (FF/S35) FF: UHD 4K 120p S35: FHD 240p 10-Bit 4:2:2 Internal Bit Rate 10-Bit 4:2:2 Internal ISO 80-409600 (Extended) ISO Range ISO 80-409600 (Extended) S-Cinetone S-Log3, S-Log2, HLG Cinema Look/Gamma S-Log3, S-Log2, HLG 5-Axis Sensor-Shift Image Stabilization 5-Axis Sensor-Shift Fast Hybrid AF with Eye AF and Subject Tracking Autofocus Fast Hybrid AF with Eye AF and Subject Tracking Removable Top Handle 5 x ¼"-20 Mounts Handle/1/4 "-20 Mounts 1 x ¼"-20 Mount Front, Top, and Rear Tally Lamp- Yes Zoom Lever- 2 x XLR/TRS via Handle 1 x 3.5mm Headphone 1 x 3.5mm Microphone 1 x 3.5mm Microphone via Handle Linear PCM 4 Channel/24-Bit Audio Recording 1 x 3.5mm Headphone 1 x 3.5mm Microphone Linear PCM 2 Channel/16-Bit 16-Bit Raw Output via HDMI Raw Output 16-Bit Raw Output via HDMI Internal Fan Active Cooling- 2 x CFexpress Type A/SD Memory Card Compatibility 2 x CFexpress Type A/SD NP-FZ100 Battery NP-FZ100 5.1 x 3.1 x 3.3" Dimensions 5.1 x 3.8 x 3.2" 1.4 lb / 640 g Weight 1.35 lb / 614 g Looking at the two side by side, there's little in it if you just want to go spec by spec. The biggest practical differences for filmmakers, beyond form factor, will be access to improved audio recording via the XLR ports in the handle of the FX3 and the inclusion of an internal fan to regulate temps for longer, unrestricted takes, and the FX3's inclusion of the S-Cinetone profile to make it a better fit within the Cinema Line of cameras, which includes the VENICE and FX6. When you take those advantages, plus the optimized body design, you get what the FX3 is all about: a great option for solo, handheld shooters and a perfect choice for a B-cam when the FX6 or VENICE is your A-cam. FX3 versus FX6 While the FX3 versus a7S III is the more realistic comparison for most, you might also be curious how the FX3 stacks up to its bigger brother, the FX6. The ergonomic and operability differences alone make the FX6 a more serious option for high-end productions, and also contribute to the FX3's position as being an ideal tool for solo, portable use. The FX6 offers improved exposure control via its built-in variable ND filter, support for timecode in/out, and raw output possible via 12G-SDI. However, the FX3 does have some distinct capabilities of its own compared to the FX6, including mechanical image stabilization and the obvious smaller form factor to better suit handheld shooting. FX3 Cinema Camera FX6 Cinema Camera 12.1MP Full-Frame Exmor R BSI CMOS Sensor BIONZ XR Processor Sensor and Processor 12.9MP Full-Frame Exmor R BSI CMOS Sensor BIONZ XR Processor FF: UHD 4K 120p S35: FHD 240p Video Resolution (FF/S35) FF: DCI & UHD 4K 120p S35: FHD 240p 10-Bit 4:2:2 Internal Bit Rate 10-Bit 4:2:2 Internal ISO 80-409600 (Extended) ISO Range ISO 320-409600 ISO 800 Base ISO 12800 High-Sensitivity Base S-Cinetone S-Log3, S-Log2, HLG Cinema Look/Gamma S-Cinetone S-Log3, HLG 709 (800%) LUT 709 (800%) / s709 Custom User LUT- Variable ND Built-In 1/4-1/128 5-Axis Sensor-Shift Image Stabilization- Fast Hybrid AF with Eye AF and Subject Tracking Autofocus Fast Hybrid AF with Eye AF Removable Top Handle 5 x ¼"-20 Mounts Handle/1/4"-20 Mounts Smart Handle Smart Grip 8 x ¼"-20 Mounts 2 x XLR/TRS via Handle 1 x 3.5mm Headphone 1 x 3.5mm Microphone Linear PCM 4 Channel/24-Bit Audio Recording 2 x XLR via Handle Linear PCM 4 Channel/24-Bit 16-Bit Raw Output via HDMI Raw Output 16-Bit Raw Output via SDI 2 x CFexpress Type A/SD Memory Card Compatibility 2 x CFexpress Type A/SD NP-FZ100 Battery BP-U35, BP-U70, BP-U100 5.1 x 3.1 x 3.3" Dimensions 6 x 4.6 x 4.5" 1.4 lb / 640 g Weight 2 lb / 890 g In terms of imaging performance, the FX3 and FX6 are certainly complementary and can be a great pair for two camera setups or when mixing studio and handheld footage within a production. The FX3 punches high in its class, and it's too bad it's missing a couple of the key features of the FX6 (namely timecode support and an ND filter) that would make it a no-brainer for professional filmmakers looking for a portable option on the next shoot. So, Who's It For? At its core, the FX3 appears to be a marriage between the photo/hybrid-oriented Alpha-series of mirrorless cameras and the high-end series of Cinema Line video cameras. There has been a major push, within the Alpha series and photo-based cameras in general, for cameras to address the multimedia shift in image making. More photographers are turning to video, more videographers are looking for photo capabilities. The lines are blurring and the FX3 is in the middle but strongly leaning toward the filmmaking end of the spectrum. Surprisingly, this makes the FX3 a strong contender for photographers or primarily stills-based image makers to make the jump to high-end video, especially if they're already a Sony Alpha shooter and have a stable of E-mount lenses. For those already working in the video world, the FX3 is a trickier piece to fit into the puzzle. Its greatest and most distinguishing assets are its form factor, its inclusion of image stabilization, and its physical design that's meant to shed the need for a cage to add on whatever accessories you're likely to use, ranging from monitors to mics. However, despite the FX3 missing out on some features of the FX6, if you were already contemplating an a7S III strictly for your filmmaking needs, the FX3 makes an enticing option from a workflow standpoint. What are your first takes on the FX3? How do you see it fitting into your workflow? Let us know, in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 02/04/21
Jake tests out the Hollyland Mars 400S PRO SDI/HDMI Wireless Video Transmission System, which is perfect for livestreaming and filmmaking. This wireless system transmits up to 1080p60 SDI or HDMI video and 400' line-of-sight to receiver (300' to Hollyview app), allowing you and your clients to conveniently and comfortably watch a video’s production. Learn more about the Hollyland Mars 400S PRO SDI/HDMI Wireless Video Transmission System at B&H Explora, and share your thoughts on the Mars 400S PRO in the Comments, below.
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Posted 01/25/21
Looking to stream your video content quickly and reliably from almost anywhere? Count on the VidiU X HD Video Streaming System, from Teradek, for your in-the-field coverage, remote instruction, work presentations, live events, and more. This compact hardware encoder is portable and powerful, letting you stream HD video at the touch of a button. The HDMI-input VidiU X broadcasts your content at resolutions up to 1080p60 using your choice of Ethernet, Wi-Fi, or an optional 4G/3G modem. This latest Teradek encoder is even Wi-Fi 6 and 5G ready, offering faster speeds and higher data rates where available. Compact design with OLED display. Versatile Streaming Options The VidiU X uses high-quality, low-latency AVC H.264 video compression and AAC-LC audio compression. Bit rates range from 250 kb/s to 15 Mb/s with preset bit rates including a mobile setting, making it easy to select a rate that's suitable and start streaming, wherever you are. Compatible with a wide array of HDMI-output cameras and video switchers, the VidiU X incorporates a scaler for converting video resolutions ranging from 720p50 to 60 and 1080p23.98 to 60 fps. The VidiU X supports 2-ch embedded audio, as well as a 2-ch line/mic input. Platform Integration With native integration for Facebook Live, YouTube Live, Vimeo Livestream, Airmix, and similar RTMP/S platforms, the VidiU X is easy to use. A boot-up time of less than 10 seconds gets your content up and out there quickly on your platform of choice. HDMI Input Field or Studio Use Network Capabilities A trio of dual-band Wi-Fi, a 10/100/1000 BASE-T Ethernet port, and a USB Type-A modem port provide the VidiU X with versatile network options. Wi-Fi features include automatic or manual channel selection, and future-proofing functions include Wi-Fi 6 and 5G support where available. Cellular bonding capability using a mix of Ethernet, Wi-Fi, and/or USB cellular modem networks enables the VidiU X to offer you stable, high-bandwidth output. When paired with an optional Teradek Sharelink subscription, you can use the VidiU X to stream to multiple destinations simultaneously. Front panel OLED. App and Web UI Configuration You can configure your VidiU X using the iOS and Android-compatible VidiU app or the feature-rich web-based user interface. Design Features The compact VidiU X features a bright, daylight-viewable OLED panel that displays your platform name, video resolution, signal strength and status, and more. An SD/SDXC card slot can be used for recording and storage. Additional features include a joystick navigator, a USB Type-C power input port, internal antennas, and both ¼"-20 and M3 mounting threads. With mobile content being increasingly popular, the Teradek VidiU X is just the solution you need for secure, stable streaming. Share your thoughts on the new VidiU X in the Comments, below, and let us know if you have any questions.
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