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Posted 08/17/21
Canon is excited to announce the XF605, the company’s new 4K, 10-bit camcorder, packed with useful features for professional productions ranging from live event to ENG, sports, studio, as well as narrative and location shoots. Slightly smaller than the XF705, the XF605 uses a 1" CMOS sensor to capture 4:2:2 10-bit UHD 4K video in MP4 and XF-AVC, for incredibly sharp video. It also captures Full HD at up to 120 fps, for slow-motion effects, and it records to two SD card slots, providing a variety of recording options from relay to instant backup. Use the camera for simultaneous 4K live output via its 12G-SDI and HDMI output ports, or take advantage of its USB-Type C port to connect it to any computer as if it were a webcam, providing simple streaming options without needing a separate encoder. The camcorder also supports the XFT iPhone app, turning it into a mobile production system. Canon XF605 The XF605 features an integrated 15x optical zoom Canon L lens, equivalent to a 25.5 to 382.5mm in 35mm, for getting in tight to your subject. The lens has three individual rings for controlling focus, zoom, and iris, so no need to flip a switch to select which function to control; just grab the ring you need on the lens directly, or use the camcorder’s built-in servo lens function. The XF605 supports Dual Pixel CMOS AF, pioneered in its high-end Cinema EOS series of cameras, and adds Eye AF to lock focus on your subject’s eye―keeping the attention on your subject and not drifting around the frame. Additionally, it supports EOS iTR AF X (also known as head detection), which will track focus with your subject as they move even should they turn their face away from the camera and walk away. Adding to its flexibility, the XF605 allows you to select the color matrix in which you wish to work, including the CINEMA EOS color matrix, for better matching and less time spent in post when using other Canon cameras on the same production. The LCD viewfinder supports HDR and features the Direct Touch Control menu that was introduced on the EOS C70, for fast adjustments. Frame and Interval recording modes offer you choices in creating time-lapse effects, while a new multifunction accessory shoe allows you to record four channels of audio via an optional XLR audio interface unit, for clean audio from multiple XLR sources. An exciting addition to the Canon XF lineup, the XF605 build brings new features and options that make it a great all-around camera that can be used on a vast array of productions, from studio and narrative work to streaming and mobile production. Plus, the XF605 works nicely with Canon’s EOS lineup of cameras, as well as the cameras in the XF series, making it easy to use it in a three-camera production. Are you looking forward to working with the XF605? Share your thoughts below, in the Comments section.
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Posted 03/17/21
Canon has never been one to sit out an opportunity to enter new markets, and during the past year, a need has manifested itself in the world for remotely controlled, networked cameras to create high-quality broadcast productions with minimal staff and crew over the Internet, from just about anywhere. To meet the requirements of the times, Canon has just announced a new line of 4K PTZ cameras, including the CR-N300 and CR-N500, as well as the new RC-IP100 PTZ camera joystick controller. Each camera fits the needs of specific production styles and features NDI|HX compatibility, high-resolution sensors, UHD 4K video capture, as well as a variety of remote control options for easy, remote pan/tilt/zoom operation. These cameras fall into a lower price range in comparison to other Canon and PTZ camera categories and specs, so they may be worth a side-by-side look. The CR-N500 will be the first to be released, with the more serious specs of the two cameras, to fit into applications that might have more cinematic requirements to match other Canon cinema cameras in your production, and you might need an additional remotely controlled camera to match your color and depth of field. The features include: Canon’s 1" CMOS sensor with Dual Pixel autofocus Canon’s DIGIC DV6 processor UHD 4K30 and 1080p60 video output via HDMI and 3G-SDI Built-in NDI|HX support Wide dynamic range Sensitivity to 1.5 lux Built-in ND filters Scene modes PoE+ for direct power Serial, IR, and IP (wired or Wi-Fi) control Professional gamma support, such as Canon Log3, to make post-production camera matching and color correction a breeze 15x zoom (25.5-382.5mm 35mm equivalent focal length) offers a highly adjustable field of view Genlock Dual XLR inputs and a mini mic input jack to fit right into a professional production The NDI|HX high-resolution/low-bandwidth compression is ideal to drop right into a professional NDI broadcast environment, with minimal configuration. The advantage of this is that many PTZ cameras on the market require a separate purchase for NDI functionality, but the license is included with these Canon PTZ cameras. If you are not using NDI, the camera can also stream over a LAN using RTP/RTMP/RTSP protocols. Another professional feature is the inclusion of built-in ND filters, mostly unheard of in today’s PTZ camera design, and the N500 includes 1/4, 1/16, and 1/64 filters. You can also power the camera via PoE+ so you can cut down on cabling on your existing PoE+ supported LAN. To remotely control the camera, you have several choices, including Canon’s IP/serial controller, IR, RS-422 serial, or via Wi-Fi using Canon’s freely downloadable camera control software. Up next is the  RC-IP100 camera joystick controller, which provides an easy way for a single operator to control multiple cameras. The controller’s bright 7" touchscreen, along with a precision joystick, provides the ability to control up to 100 PTZ cameras. It supports the Canon IP protocol, a proprietary IP protocol that allows you to create a fast, private network to control your cameras, or you can utilize RS-422 serial protocol to connect to the cameras. The controller features six customizable function buttons and stores up to 100 presets, and the joystick allows for fine control of pan, tilt, and zoom for smooth camera movements. The following table provides a spec comparison between the new PTZ cameras and Canon camcorders: CR-N300 PTZ XA40 Camcorder CR-N500 PTZ XF705 Camcorder Sensor 1/2.3" CMOS 1/2.3" CMOS 1" CMOS 1" CMOS Zoom 20x 20x 15x 15x Format UHD 4K30, 1080p60 UHD 4K30, 1080p60 UHD 4K30, 1080p60 UHD 4K60, 1080p60 Outputs USB, 3G-SDI, HDMI Mini-HDMI 3G-SDI, HDMI 12G-SDI, HDMI Control IP, IR, RS-422, UVC, Wi-Fi n/a IP, IR, R-422, Wi-Fi RS-422, Wi-Fi NDI|HX Yes, License Included n/a Yes, License Included n/a ND Filters n/a Optional on Lens Clear, 1/4, 1/16, 1/64 Clear, 1/4, 1/16, 1/64 Gamma n/a n/a Wide DR, CLog3, HLG Wide DR, CLog3, HLG Inputs Audio Mini Jack Mini Jack + 2 x XLR Mini Jack + 2 x XLR Mini Jack + 2 x XLR Recording Output Only 2 x SD Slots Output Only 2 x SD Slots Power PoE+ Battery or DC PoE+ Battery or DC Genlock n/a n/a Yes Yes Last, and available in Q3 2021, is the CR-N300 PTZ camera that falls into a more accessible category, aimed at houses of worship, corporate conferencing, event spaces, broadcast, government, streaming, or documentary-style productions. It shares the same IR, RS-422, Wi-Fi, compatibility with Canon’s IP controller, DIGIC DV6 processor, wide dynamic range, NDI|HX support, PoE+, and scene modes as the CR-N500, but its features are focused on ease-of-use and affordability. The N300 features include: A 1/2.3" CMOS sensor with Dual Pixel AF Canon’s DIGIC DV6 processor Wide dynamic range 1.5 lux 20x optical zoom (29.3-601mm 35mm equivalent focal length) Support for UHD 4K30 and 1080p60 video capture NDI|HX support Scene modes PoE+ Serial, IR, and IP (wired or Wi-Fi) control In addition to IP, HDMI, and 3G-SDI outputs, it also features a USB Type-C output with UVC support so you can utilize it as a tethered webcam There are no XLR inputs, but it does feature microphone input using with a mini jack Both cameras will be available in Satin Black and Titanium White finishes, and they are compatible with the Canon camera control software that is free to download. It allows you to see a 9 x 9 live view grid of your cameras, control your camera, change settings on multiple cameras, view tally information, and load settings configurations from an external drive. It is compatible with Windows OS as well as USB joysticks. Be sure to check out the newest Canon PTZ offerings on the B&H Photo website to compare their specs and features side-by-side, and we’ll keep an eye out for their release dates. Are you excited by these new releases? Feel free to tell us why in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 02/23/21
Emphasizing compactness, Sony's FX3 Cinema Camera is the latest take on blurring the lines between Sony's Cinema and Alpha lines of cameras, marrying the top-end video capabilities of the FX cameras with a portable, handheld-optimized form factor like the a7S III. As a camera straddling the lines of capability and versatility, the FX3 takes some of the most coveted features from both to make the ideal camera for solo shooters, for travel needs, for use as a B-camera on high-end shoots, or simply as the main camera for filmmakers who treasure the idea of a sleek and well-spec'd full-frame cinema camera. Correction: The Sony ECM-XM1 Microphone is not included. Sony FX3 Full-Frame Cinema Camera What Is It? Covering the imaging tech, the FX3 has a familiar set of features, which is honestly fine because it's complementing two lines that have just been marked by homeruns in terms of imaging assets. • Just like the a7S III, the FX3 features Sony's full-frame 12.1MP Exmor R BSI CMOS sensor and BIONZ XR processor. This sensor-processor combination gives you that desirable "full-frame look" along with 15+ stops of dynamic range, impressive write speeds to help limit rolling shutter, ISO 80-102400 sensitivity that can expand to ISO 409600, and the BSI design limits noise and promotes clarity for low-light shooting. • UHD 4K recording up to 120p using the full-frame recording area, as well as Full HD shooting at 240p within a Super 35mm area. • Internal 10-bit 4:2:2 recording to CFexpress Type A or SD memory cards. Recording externally, via the full-size HDMI port, 16-bit raw output is possible along with 10-bit 4:2:2 recording, too. • XAVC HS codec uses H.265 encoding to retain detail at smaller bitrates while the XAVC S-I ALL-I H.264 codec supports recording up to 600 Mb/s. • S-Cinetone support for distinct film-like colors and matching to VENICE, FX9, and FX6 sources, or even a7S III or Alpha 1 cameras. Also, S-Log3/2 gamut support and 10-bit HLG for simple HDR productions. • Fast Hybrid AF, which uses 627 points covering approximately 89% of the image frame, is a feature well known to Alpha-series users and also affords Eye AF, Eye and Face Detection, and subject-tracking capabilities. • Built-in cooling fan and heat-dissipating design for uninterrupted recording up to 4K 60. • Weather-sealed body features a magnesium-alloy chassis, stainless-steel components, and an anti-dust system to reinforce working outdoors further. • USB Type-C port for in-camera battery charging or power delivery via an external battery pack. • Same NP-FZ100 battery as the a7S III; however, offers more efficient performance for 1.6x longer battery life. The core specs are great, and what you'd expect from a camera of this class. The FX3 relies heavily on the well-regarded a7S III capabilities, but with a bit more emphasis on just video rather than catering to photo users. So, What's Unique About It? The design. The FX3 is distinct because of how it looks, how it feels, and how it operates. While it borrows a bit from the FX6 in terms of imaging, it leans more into its video-oriented nook with regard to operation and handling. • It's compact! Measuring roughly 5 x 3 x 3", it's about the same size as the a7-series of cameras but sheds the viewfinder hump for a more streamlined and minimal rectangular shape. There's still a large right-hand grip for handheld shooting, and the touchscreen 3.0" LCD flips out to the side and tilts for working from high and low angles. • As a camera meant for handheld shooting, it features the Alpha series 5-axis image stabilization, which offers an Active mode to help steady shots when walking, even without a gimbal. • Catalyst Prepare/Browse software can use the "shake metadata" to help compensate for shake and realign footage during post. • Included removable handle attaches via the Multi-Interface Shoe and makes it easier to shoot handheld from low angles. • Newly designed body is specifically meant to be used without a cage; it features five ¼"-20 mounts for direct accessory attachment, as well as three more threaded mounts on the handle. • While the physical exposure controls match Cinema Line cameras, and it includes direct dials for adjusting Iris, ISO, and Shutter settings, along with integrated zoom adjustment and a tally lamp, the menu system is taken from the a7S III for intuitive navigation. • The removable handle incorporates dual XLR/TRS connectors to make use of the four-channel, 24-bit digital audio interface. The body itself also has 3.5mm ports for a mic and headphones. • Wireless connectivity using 2.4 or 5 GHz speeds, along with 2x2 MIMO support, for mobile tethering. Also compatible with optional USB Type-C to Ethernet adapter. The FX3 feels inspired by the Alpha series, because it's a camera that's more at home in the hand rather than atop a tripod in the studio. It's something that's meant to be used outdoors, on the go, and it has the feature set to complement this type of shooting. FX3 versus a7S III Anyone considering the FX3 may also be thinking to themselves, "How does it differ from the a7S III?" The two are fairly similar in many ways but are apparently targeting different imaging sectors. According to Sony, the a7S III is still very much a photo and video camera, whereas the FX3 is a cinema camera that can shoot stills in a pinch. More than just a twist of words, the FX3 is deliberately lacking some of the photo assets to make room for more video operability. Whereas the a7S III has the built-in EVF, and the characteristic viewfinder "hump," the FX3 opts for a more minimal and functional rectangular profile with purpose-built design elements, including multiple ¼"-20 mounts on the body and a removable top handle that slots into the Multi-Interface Shoe for improved audio and low-angle ergonomics. FX3 Cinema Camera a7S III Mirrorless Camera 12.1MP Full-Frame Exmor R BSI CMOS Sensor BIONZ XR Processor Sensor and Processor 12.1MP Full-Frame Exmor R BSI CMOS Sensor BIONZ XR Processor FF: UHD 4K 120p S35: FHD 240p Video Resolution (FF/S35) FF: UHD 4K 120p S35: FHD 240p 10-Bit 4:2:2 Internal Bit Rate 10-Bit 4:2:2 Internal ISO 80-409600 (Extended) ISO Range ISO 80-409600 (Extended) S-Cinetone S-Log3, S-Log2, HLG Cinema Look/Gamma S-Log3, S-Log2, HLG 5-Axis Sensor-Shift Image Stabilization 5-Axis Sensor-Shift Fast Hybrid AF with Eye AF and Subject Tracking Autofocus Fast Hybrid AF with Eye AF and Subject Tracking Removable Top Handle 5 x ¼"-20 Mounts Handle/1/4 "-20 Mounts 1 x ¼"-20 Mount Front, Top, and Rear Tally Lamp- Yes Zoom Lever- 2 x XLR/TRS via Handle 1 x 3.5mm Headphone 1 x 3.5mm Microphone 1 x 3.5mm Microphone via Handle Linear PCM 4 Channel/24-Bit Audio Recording 1 x 3.5mm Headphone 1 x 3.5mm Microphone Linear PCM 2 Channel/16-Bit 16-Bit Raw Output via HDMI Raw Output 16-Bit Raw Output via HDMI Internal Fan Active Cooling- 2 x CFexpress Type A/SD Memory Card Compatibility 2 x CFexpress Type A/SD NP-FZ100 Battery NP-FZ100 5.1 x 3.1 x 3.3" Dimensions 5.1 x 3.8 x 3.2" 1.4 lb / 640 g Weight 1.35 lb / 614 g Looking at the two side by side, there's little in it if you just want to go spec by spec. The biggest practical differences for filmmakers, beyond form factor, will be access to improved audio recording via the XLR ports in the handle of the FX3 and the inclusion of an internal fan to regulate temps for longer, unrestricted takes, and the FX3's inclusion of the S-Cinetone profile to make it a better fit within the Cinema Line of cameras, which includes the VENICE and FX6. When you take those advantages, plus the optimized body design, you get what the FX3 is all about: a great option for solo, handheld shooters and a perfect choice for a B-cam when the FX6 or VENICE is your A-cam. FX3 versus FX6 While the FX3 versus a7S III is the more realistic comparison for most, you might also be curious how the FX3 stacks up to its bigger brother, the FX6. The ergonomic and operability differences alone make the FX6 a more serious option for high-end productions, and also contribute to the FX3's position as being an ideal tool for solo, portable use. The FX6 offers improved exposure control via its built-in variable ND filter, support for timecode in/out, and raw output possible via 12G-SDI. However, the FX3 does have some distinct capabilities of its own compared to the FX6, including mechanical image stabilization and the obvious smaller form factor to better suit handheld shooting. FX3 Cinema Camera FX6 Cinema Camera 12.1MP Full-Frame Exmor R BSI CMOS Sensor BIONZ XR Processor Sensor and Processor 12.9MP Full-Frame Exmor R BSI CMOS Sensor BIONZ XR Processor FF: UHD 4K 120p S35: FHD 240p Video Resolution (FF/S35) FF: DCI & UHD 4K 120p S35: FHD 240p 10-Bit 4:2:2 Internal Bit Rate 10-Bit 4:2:2 Internal ISO 80-409600 (Extended) ISO Range ISO 320-409600 ISO 800 Base ISO 12800 High-Sensitivity Base S-Cinetone S-Log3, S-Log2, HLG Cinema Look/Gamma S-Cinetone S-Log3, HLG 709 (800%) LUT 709 (800%) / s709 Custom User LUT- Variable ND Built-In 1/4-1/128 5-Axis Sensor-Shift Image Stabilization- Fast Hybrid AF with Eye AF and Subject Tracking Autofocus Fast Hybrid AF with Eye AF Removable Top Handle 5 x ¼"-20 Mounts Handle/1/4"-20 Mounts Smart Handle Smart Grip 8 x ¼"-20 Mounts 2 x XLR/TRS via Handle 1 x 3.5mm Headphone 1 x 3.5mm Microphone Linear PCM 4 Channel/24-Bit Audio Recording 2 x XLR via Handle Linear PCM 4 Channel/24-Bit 16-Bit Raw Output via HDMI Raw Output 16-Bit Raw Output via SDI 2 x CFexpress Type A/SD Memory Card Compatibility 2 x CFexpress Type A/SD NP-FZ100 Battery BP-U35, BP-U70, BP-U100 5.1 x 3.1 x 3.3" Dimensions 6 x 4.6 x 4.5" 1.4 lb / 640 g Weight 2 lb / 890 g In terms of imaging performance, the FX3 and FX6 are certainly complementary and can be a great pair for two camera setups or when mixing studio and handheld footage within a production. The FX3 punches high in its class, and it's too bad it's missing a couple of the key features of the FX6 (namely timecode support and an ND filter) that would make it a no-brainer for professional filmmakers looking for a portable option on the next shoot. So, Who's It For? At its core, the FX3 appears to be a marriage between the photo/hybrid-oriented Alpha-series of mirrorless cameras and the high-end series of Cinema Line video cameras. There has been a major push, within the Alpha series and photo-based cameras in general, for cameras to address the multimedia shift in image making. More photographers are turning to video, more videographers are looking for photo capabilities. The lines are blurring and the FX3 is in the middle but strongly leaning toward the filmmaking end of the spectrum. Surprisingly, this makes the FX3 a strong contender for photographers or primarily stills-based image makers to make the jump to high-end video, especially if they're already a Sony Alpha shooter and have a stable of E-mount lenses. For those already working in the video world, the FX3 is a trickier piece to fit into the puzzle. Its greatest and most distinguishing assets are its form factor, its inclusion of image stabilization, and its physical design that's meant to shed the need for a cage to add on whatever accessories you're likely to use, ranging from monitors to mics. However, despite the FX3 missing out on some features of the FX6, if you were already contemplating an a7S III strictly for your filmmaking needs, the FX3 makes an enticing option from a workflow standpoint. What are your first takes on the FX3? How do you see it fitting into your workflow? Let us know, in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 09/10/20
Here at B&H Photo, we're happy to announce something special for owners and users of Sony’s FX9 and Venice cameras. Sony PXW-FX9 XDCAM 6K Full-Frame Camera System Sony PXW-FX9 Version 2.0 of the camera’s firmware will greatly expand the FX9’s already-impressive capabilities. UPDATE: Sony has officially released version 2.0 for the FX9. It is available for download on Sony's Support Page. DCI 4K and RAW Recording With this update, DCI 4K will be supported in Full Frame and Super 35mm, including 60, 50, 30, 25, and 24p. This is for the cinema purists, as well as anyone who has been asking for DCI support since before the FX9 was even released. You can also shoot 1920 x 1080p at 150/180 fps, in Full Frame, for creating even more dramatic cinematic effects. Firmware V 2.0 also brings the promised 16-bit RAW recording functionality, although it does require the addition of the XDCA-FX9 Extension Unit, but if you want or need RAW, this is the firmware update for you. 6G-SDI While the FX-9 originally supported 4K 59.94/50p over its 12G SDI connection, the new firmware will add 6G support, which in turns adds 30/23.98p output via a single SDI cable. LUTs, HDR, and Expanded ISO Range Create your own 3D LUTs in the.cube format, or upload them from an SD card, because the V 2.0 firmware enables your camera to store up to 16 LUTs to work with. Along with LUT support, the firmware delivers HDR support for HLG (in-camera HDR). Expanded ISO ranges in both Base ISO and High ISO settings allow the camera to see even farther into the shadows, for improved low-light performance. Audio Improvements Need more reasons for adding the XDCA-FX9 to your shooting arsenal than just the RAW output? Figure this into your gear purchase equations: The XDCA-FX9 will support DWX and URX slot-in wireless receivers when your camera has the V 2.0 firmware installed. And if you are using the XLR-K3M to bring in analog audio through the Multi-Interface Shoe, the firmware update will also allow for digital I/F. Autofocus and Improved Touch Menu With the V 2.0 firmware, your camera will support Sony's eye-tracking technology, which keeps your focus locked on your subject's eye and is especially useful in intimate interview situations. Focus Touch Control will allow you to lock in a specific area and keep that in focus, without deactivating autofocus; this is in addition to the current Touch AF feature. You can also assign AF Speed/Sens to a function button of your choice, allowing you to tune the AF settings without having to go back into the AF menu. Touch screen control has been made for faster adjustments, and the new firmware expands the touch menu operation. It will highlight in orange all the features that are touch-control adjustable, and the FPS, ISO, Shutter, ND, LUT, and WB menu layout is now similar to the Venice menu layout, for simpler operation when switching between cameras. Sony Venice The Version 5.0 firmware (already released earlier this year) brought many improvements to the Venice’s capabilities. These included High Frame Rates when shooting at 6K, up to 90 fps at 2.39:1, and 72 fps at either 17:9 or 1.85:1, useful for general filmmaking when you don’t need a dedicated high-speed camera for ultra-high-speed filming. Version 5.0 also brought the ability to capture HD ProRes 4444 at up to 30 fps onto SxS Pro+ cards, and compatibility with the Cooke/i2 lens information system. In addition to improved monitoring function, including marker settings, V 5.0 activated the camera’s gyro sensor. These are the most recent improvements, and if you don’t have V 5.0, you should probably think about downloading it. But hold onto your hat, because come November, Sony will be releasing V 6.0 of the Sony Venice firmware. The Version 6.0 firmware update will bring even more HFR capabilities, up to 72 fps at 5.7k 16:9 and also at 4K 6:5, as well as allow a blazing 110 fps at 3.8K 16:9 capture. Pretty decent for a Full-Frame camera that isn’t dedicated to high-speed filmmaking. Shooting Functions Improvements will include gyro information embedded in the Metadata, and the camera will add support for the Fujinon Premista series Zeiss eXtended Data. Personally, I love it when manufacturers play nice with each other; it really allows us to use the tools we want for each situation, opening up more possibilities. Monitoring The 6.0 firmware allows you to use 3D LUTs on the camera’s viewfinder, for instant feedback on how you expect the shot to look. This goes hand in hand with the new.ART (Advanced Rendering Transform) file import, which provides smoother rending of areas that used to suffer from banding artifacts, providing a less distracting image and removing unnecessary concern when monitoring from the viewfinder. Shooting Assist Functions Rounding out this update for the Venice are the addition of a second User Frame Line, as well as both 9:16 and 1:1 Frame lines presets (9:16, it’s here, might as well be able to frame it up properly). Some small tweaks to the camera’s functionality will include individual adjustment of the REC beep and alarm volume, and the CamID+Reel# won’t be lost when loading ALL File. The firmware 6.0 update will also allow you to display Genlock and TC status on the OSD screen, and De-Squeeze On/Off is now available by a User button. Virtually New Cameras With an expected release in November 2020, these firmware updates will unleash more performance and more functionality from your cameras, essentially giving you a new camera. For more information on Sony professional video cameras, visit the B&H Photo Website.
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Posted 05/12/20
Maria teaches you how to make your own food video at home, with tips on filming, lighting, and editing and some fun tricks to make it your own! Also check out these other  At-Home videos  for more ways to help you stay creative at home.
427 Views
Posted 04/15/19
At NAB 2019, word on the convention floor is that 8K is here! With new 8K cameras, displays, and video gear surrounding the show floor, Doug went around to find out just what the 8K buzz is all about. After you’re done watching, be sure to check out all our NAB 2019 coverage at BandH.com.
636 Views
Posted 04/10/19
The omnipresent Jake Estes walks us through the workflow of the Sharp B30 8K Mirrorless Camera, a super compact, Micro Four Thirds format camera capable of 8K recording, featuring a 5.5" Full-HD LCD touch display. After capturing footage with the B30 in Sharp’s 8K studio at NAB, Estes goes through the editing workflow and discusses potential applications for the camera. After you’re finished watching, be sure to check out all our NAB 2019 coverage at BandH.com.
2511 Views
Posted 04/01/19
Just before NAB 2019, Canon has decided to drop five (!) 4K-capable camcorders for professionals and consumers. B&H’s Jake Estes takes a closer look at the XA40 and XA50 Pro models, featuring advanced inputs and top handles, and presents an overview of the XA45 and XA55. Estes even provides a quick look at the consumer-focused Vixia HF G60 4K Camcorder. Be sure to drop by BandH.com for more videos, informational articles, and more.
1950 Views
Posted 03/04/19
Welcome to the B&H Tech Corner! In this video, we check in with Elliot Torres as he answers the five most frequently asked questions about the Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4K —everything from lens compatibility to recording audio. We hope you enjoy the video, and invite you to check out our wide selection of instructional and informative videos at BandH.com. Presenter: Elliot Torres Director: Bruno Derlin Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
715 Views
Posted 01/08/19
What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas—unless you are B&H’s own Jake Estes, covering the goings-on at CES 2019. In this video, Estes dives right in and highlights Canon’s three new Vixia Camcorders, the HF W10, HF W11, and the HF G50. The W10 and W11 are waterproof and can be submerged down to 16', and they are Canon’s first underwater Vixia camcorders. Each camcorder comes with a built-in 5-hour rechargeable battery, and records on SD cards. The W10 features 8GB of built-in memory, while the W11 incorporates 32GB and a built-in video light. The HF G50, though not waterproof, does shoot UHD at 30 fps with a 20x optical zoom lens, when shooting in 4K. Keep watching and check back often for more of B&H Photo’s coverage of CES 2019.
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