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Posted 09/14/20
If you’ve ever wondered just how small Sony could make its full-frame mirrorless cameras, the newly announced a7C is here to provide you with the answer. Squeezing a 24.2MP BSI sensor into an APS-C form factor body, along with 5-axis sensor-shift image stabilization, the a7C is the smallest and lightest camera of its kind, opening up a world of possibilities for photographers and videographers. Accompanying the new ultra-portable body, Sony has also unveiled the FE 28-60mm f/4-5.6 lens, the smallest and lightest standard zoom FE lens. Paired with the a7C, its similar sleek stature offers all of the benefits of a versatile full-frame system without the usual heft. Rounding out the new releases is the HVL-F28RM Flash, an easily pocketable wireless flash perfect for any of Sony’s a7 series cameras. Who Is the a7C For? The a7C is the perfect camera for vloggers, travel photographers, or any other image maker who wants the benefits of Sony’s full-frame mirrorless system in the smallest and lightest possible form factor. Sharing a similar design to Sony’s a6000-series APS-C mirrorless cameras, the a7C is svelte enough to carry comfortably in a purse, tote bag, or backpack, making full-frame everyday carry a reality. Conversely, the a7C could also serve as an excellent second camera or compact option for photographers already invested in Sony’s full-frame camera system. Sony a7C at a Glance: 24.2MP Full-Frame Exmor R BSI CMOS Sensor BIONZ X Image Processor UHD 4K30p Video with HLG/HDR and S-Log3/2 15 Stops of Dynamic Range 5-Axis In-Body Image Stabilization Vari-Angle Touchscreen LCD Smallest Full-Frame Camera with IBIS to Date Full-Frame Sensor Captures High-Quality Imagery The a7C features a 24.2MP back-illuminated full-frame Exmor R CMOS sensor paired with a BIONZ X Image Processor to capture high-resolution imagery quickly, with minimal noise. Capable of ISOs up to 204800, and boasting 15 stops of dynamic range, the a7C handles challenging lighting environments with ease so you can count on your images being sharp and accurate no matter where you are shooting. 5-Axis Image Stabilization Minimizes Shake In-body image stabilization (IBIS) has been a calling card of Sony’s mirrorless cameras for years. The a7C incorporates 5-axis IBIS so you can shoot stills and video handheld with minimal shake affecting your images. This also allows you to shoot at slower shutter speeds so you can work in low-light environments or explore creative scenarios that would not otherwise be possible. Advanced Hybrid Autofocus Keeps up with the Action The a7C benefits from 693 phase-detection and 425 contrast-detection points for reliable and fast autofocusing. Real-time Eye AF maintains focus on your subject’s eyes whether you’re composing a portrait, documenting an event, taking a selfie, or recording a vlog. Sony’s new Animal Eye AF is available for capturing stills of your pets, and the a7C also features Real-Time tracking, which comes in handy when trying to keep pace with moving subjects common in wildlife, sports, and street photography. When shooting stills, the a7C supports up to 10 fps continuous shooting so you can be confident that you will get the shot you want. 4K Video Recording The a7C is an excellent hybrid option for those who need to capture stills and videos using the same camera. It offers UHD 4K recording at up to 30 fps with full pixel readout and 4:2:0 8-bit output, as well as Full HD recording at up to 120 fps for slow-motion playback. S-Log2, S-Log3, and Hybrid Log-Gamma (HLG) support are all available to achieve greater dynamic range and offer more flexibility during post-production. Headphone and microphone jacks are integrated into the body so you can record and monitor audio through the camera, and the a7C features a Multi-Interface Shoe that supports a digital audio interface when used in conjunction with shoe-mounted mics. Also, an HDMI Type-D port can be used in conjunction with an external recorder to gain 4:2:2 8-bit recording up to UHD 4K at 30 fps. Unique Yet Familiar Design The a7C’s design shares its form factor and the layout of many of its controls with Sony’s a6000 line of cameras. Chief among its similarities is the rangefinder-esque positioning of its 2.36m-dot EVF, as well as the general layout of its rear control buttons. Unlike past models, its SD card slot has been moved to the left side of the body alongside USB-C and micro-HDMI ports. And for wireless connectivity, the a7C can connect to your smartphone or computer via high-speed 2.4 or 5GHz Wi-Fi bands. Tethered shooting is also possible via USB for applications that benefit from larger or additional screens. The a7C was designed with today’s generation of content creators in mind. A vari-angle, side-opening 3.0" touchscreen LCD can be flipped out and rotated, making it easy for vloggers to adjust settings and monitor recordings in real time. Further streamlining operation, a top panel record button is easy to access whether you are in front of or behind the camera. The a7C is also compatible with Sony’s Wireless Shooting Grip for even greater control when shooting self-directed content. Complementing the portability of the a7C is its dust- and moisture-resistant design, so you can shoot outside without checking the forecast. A magnesium-alloy chassis further reinforces the build of the camera. Finally, the a7C uses the same NP-FZ100 battery as other recent Sony cameras, lasting up to 740 images or 225 minutes of recording between charges. A Stepping Stone for Sony Photographers The a7C introduces a fourth category within Sony’s full-frame mirrorless a7-series lineup. Joining the video powerhouse a7S III, high resolution a7R IV, and hybrid a7 III, the a7C becomes the compact camera of choice at this format. In terms of features and size, the a7C fits right between Sony’s a6600 and a7 III mirrorless cameras. On one hand, it serves as a step up for APS-C sensor photographers itching to take full advantage of Sony’s FE lenses. On the other hand, it serves as a step down in size for photographers who need an ultra-compact body without sacrificing sensor size.   a7C a7 III a6600 SENSOR 24MP Full-Frame BSI 24MP Full-Frame BSI 24MP APS-C PROCESSOR BIONZ X BIONZ X BIONZ X VIDEO RESOLUTION UHD 4K up to 30p 8-bit, 4:2:0 Internal UHD 4K up to 30p 8-bit, 4:2:0 Internal UHD 4K up to 30p 8-bit, 4:2:0 Internal RECORDING LIMIT None Up to 29 min. None SENSITIVITY ISO 100-51200 (Extended: ISO 50-204800) ISO 100-51200 (Extended: ISO 50-204800) ISO 100-32000 (Extended: ISO 100-102400) AUTOFOCUS 693-Point Fast Hybrid AF Upgraded Real-Time Tracking 693-Point Fast Hybrid AF 425-Point Fast Hybrid AF STABILIZATION 5-Axis In-Body 5-Axis In-Body 5-Axis In-Body VIEWFINDER 2.36m-Dot OLED 0.39"-Type EVF 2.36m-Dot OLED 0.5"-Type EVF 2.36m-Dot OLED 0.39"-Type EVF SCREEN 3.0" Vari-Angle Touchscreen 3.0" Tilting Touchscreen 3.0" 180° Tilting Touchscreen MEDIA 1 x SD (UHS-II) 1 x SD (UHS-II) 1 x SD (UHS-I) 1 x SD (UHS-I) BATTERY NP-FZ100 (740 Images/225 min.) NP-FZ100 (710 Images/210 min.) NP-FZ100 (810 Images/250 min.) DIMENSIONS 4.88 x 2.32 x 2.80" 5.00 x 3.74 x 2.87" 4.72 x 2.32 x 2.64" WEIGHT 1.12 lb 1.44 lb 1.11 lb A Compact Lens for a Compact Camera Accompanying the a7C is Sony’s new FE 28-60mm f/4-5.6 Lens, the lightest and most compact FE standard zoom to date, weighing only 5.8 oz. Providing a perfect range for event, portrait, street, and landscape photography, the newest addition to the FE lineup serves as an excellent all-around lens for everyday carry. Its retracting design also increases its portability when not in use. Optically, this new lens incorporates three aspherical elements for superior sharpness and accurate rendering. A linear AF motor provides fast and silent autofocusing, making it well equipped for still and video applications, and a minimum focusing distance range of 11.8-17.7" (depending on focal length) is perfect for capturing selfies and close-ups without strain. Finally, like the a7C, it features a dust- and moisture-resistant design for safe use outdoors. Also, beyond the kit lens, Sony has recently introduced the LA-EA5 A-Mount to E-Mount Adapter, which is its most capable adapter, helping to bring Sony A-mount shooters over to the sleek E-mount mirrorless system. This adapter expands the usable number of lenses for mirrorless users without compromising on features and compatibility. Powerful, Pocketable Flash Finally, Sony has also announced the HVL-F28RM External Flash, an extremely compact and portable light perfect for pairing with the a7C. The new flash incorporates wireless radio control so you can work with it atop your camera or incorporate it into your existing Sony flash system to add an extra splash of light wherever you may need it. This flash has a guide number of about 92' and, going along with the common theme of today’s announcement, a more compact form factor than Sony’s HVL-F32M and HVL-F45M flashes. The Bottom Line If you have been thinking about stepping up to a full-frame camera but are concerned about bulky bodies and heavy lenses, the a7C may be just the camera you’ve been waiting for. If you already shoot full frame but have yet to find a camera body small enough for everyday carry, the a7C could fill this gap in your collection. Finally, if weight and size are limiting factors and your practice requires image stabilization, the a7C cannot be matched. How would you use Sony’s latest mirrorless camera? Share your thoughts in the Comments section, below!
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Posted 08/03/20
Olympus has announced its latest OM-D series mirrorless camera, the OM-D E-M10 Mark IV, which becomes the fourth iteration of this compact Micro Four Thirds camera since the series debuted in 2014. The E-M10 is the sleekest camera in the OM-D lineup and this latest Mark IV is not only lighter than its predecessor, it has improved features, including an upgraded 20MP sensor. Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV Designed for travelers, enthusiasts, and those who appreciate great image quality from a truly compact interchangeable lens camera, the E-M10 Mark IV features a 20MP Live MOS sensor, which is a resolution boost over the Mark III’s 16MP sensor.  Other welcomed upgrades include a selfie-friendly 180° tilt-down touchscreen LCD, compared to 45° on the Mark III, and the availability of direct USB charging. Continuous shooting with the camera’s mechanical shutter is a bit faster, as well, reaching 8.7 fps, and its in-body 5-axis image stabilization compensates for approximately 4.5 stops of camera shake to improve image quality in low light. There is also UHD 4K video recording, up to 30 fps, along with Full HD 60 fps recording and high-speed HD video at 120 fps. Wireless connectivity was limited to Wi-Fi in previous models but Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are now included for “always-on” connection and background connection via Bluetooth and the OI Share Smartphone app. Also, an Instant Film filter was added to the array of fun and useful in-camera Art Filters. Already known for its palm-size retro good looks and easy handling, this version of the E-M10 managed to shave off a bit of weight, and with its kit-mate attached (the M.Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 EZ), it weighs right around 1.25 lb. It really is an ideal camera with which to “leave the phone in your pocket” and jump into interchangeable-lens photography. Having used several E-M10 models over the past few years, I’ve come to appreciate this series, not simply because of its handling and attractive, compact body, which includes a deep grip enabling easy one-handed shooting and more stability when using a long lens. I like its Digital ESP metering system, the range of focus features, such as Eye Priority and Face Priority, and the Silent Modes available in SCN, AP, P, A, S, M, and ART modes. AP Mode also includes a new Sweep Panorama function. Its 121-point Contrast Detection autofocus provides Super Spot AF when a Micro Four Thirds lens is attached. Manual focus assist functions such as magnification and focus peaking are very helpful, and the 1.04m-dot rear touch control monitor enables touch AF, in addition to shutter release, Wi-Fi connection, and other settings control. Also, catering to social interests, the flip-down 3.0" monitor works in tandem with the camera’s dedicated selfie mode, which turns on automatically when the monitor is flipped down. The rear button layout is also adjusted for simple operation when in selfie mode. 4K and Full HD video are supported, and a multi-mode built-in flash, as well as a hot shoe for external flash, are available. M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5-6.3 IS Lens                                                         Olympus has also announced a new telephoto zoom lens, the M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5-6.3 IS, which is an ideal match for the new E-M10 Mark IV, given that it is also quite compact for a lens with such long reach. Its 200-800mm equivalent focal length is well suited to bird, wildlife, sports, and other genres of image making that require distance from your subject. When paired with the MC-20 M.Zuiko Digital 2.0x Teleconverter, its equivalent effective focal length reach goes up to 1600mm! Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5-6.3 IS Lens At just 8.1" long and 2.5 lb, its handsome barrel is also dust- and splash-proof, affording a measure of security when working in rain or sub-optimal conditions. In-lens image stabilization adds to the ability to capture sharp images in low light and, when working at extreme telephoto lengths, a focus-limiter switch aids in fast autofocus control. Minimum focus distance is a very respectable 4.3' with 0.57x magnification. The lens has 21 elements in 15 groups, including a series of high refractive index elements and extra-low dispersion glass, and a Zuiko Extra-Low Reflection Optical Coating to minimize unwanted reflections and provide high-resolution telephoto imaging. While this lens is compatible with all of the Olympus Micro Four Thirds cameras, it is a fine partner for the new OM-D E-M10 Mark IV mirrorless camera, which is an ideal camera for those looking to step up from their smartphone, improve their photography skills, or just have a palm-size, fully automatic and manual camera as an everyday carry. Please let us know your experiences with the Olympus E-M10 series and ask any questions you may have in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 07/28/20
The Sony a7S III is finally here! The newest Sony camera features a brand-new back side-illuminated 12.1MP full-frame CMOS sensor that delivers vibrant, yet natural colors, fast autofocus for photo and video, internal 4K 10-bit video up to 120 fps, touch focus in every mode, 5.5 stops of image stabilization, passive heat management, and much more! Doug Guerra takes the Sony a7S III out for a real-world test in various conditions, including low light. He also compares its features to the Sony a7S II and the Sony a7R IV. Learn more about the Sony a7S III Mirrorless Digital Camera at B&H Explora.
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Posted 07/24/20
In early July 2020, Canon announced a pair of EOS R-series cameras that should prove to be true game changers in the world of mirrorless cameras. The new cameras are the Canon EOS R5 and R6. Both are full-frame cameras—the R5 features a 45MP sensor, the R6 features a 20MP sensor—and have amazing stills and video. The following is everything else you need to know about these exciting new cameras. Also, at the top of this page is a replay of our Live Q&A with Canon Technical Expert Rudy Winston. You'll find some questions have an accompanying timestamp; in these cases, you can actually click through the video above and find where this particular subject was addressed during the event. The Cameras—Canon's EOS R5 and R6 Camera Sensors Still Imaging Video Viewing Systems Autofocus Exposure Control 5-Axis Sensor-Shift Image Stabilization EF Lens Compatibility Wi-Fi Memory Cards Battery Life The Cameras—Canon's EOS R5 and R6 What are the differences between the Canon EOS R5 and R6 camera bodies? (Video Time Code – 4:39) The clearest and most direct difference between the two is the sensor: the R5 has the higher resolution 45MP sensor while the R6 has a more modest 20MP sensor. And, though they closely resemble one another, there are a number of differences between the Canon EOS R5 and Canon EOS R6 in regard to their construction materials. The R5 is made predominantly of magnesium alloy and is comparable to the Canon EOS 5D IV in terms of weatherproofing and construction quality. (Video Time Code – 24:58) Canon EOS R5 Canon EOS R6 Canon EOS 5D Mark IV The body of the R6 features a higher percentage of reinforced polycarbonate materials and fewer metal alloy components. The top plate of the R5 features a settings display whereas the R6 has a mode dial. (Video Time Code – 16:50 / 2:32:58) The R5 also has a full-size N3 remote release socket on its front plate and PC sync port on the side, along with 3.5mm headphone and 3.5mm mic ports. (Video Time Code – 02:04:52) The R6 also features 3.5mm headphone and 3.5mm mic ports but lacks the N3 remote and PC sync ports. Both cameras feature four main control dials and a joystick on the back of the camera for quick AF-point selection and menu navigation. (Video Time Code – 16:35 / 2:32:58) What about shape, size, and weight? How do the R5 and R6 differ? (Video Time Code – 15:29) Canon's EOS R5 and R6 are similar in size and weight and they share a similar form factor. The R5 weighs 1.62 lb versus the 1.5 lb of the R6, and dimensionally they are very similar, but the shape of the R5 is slightly more angular compared to the R6. The R5 also features better weather sealing compared to the R6. In terms of construction and performance, if you had to compare the R5 and R6 to any of the existing Canon DSLRs, how would they stack up? (Video Time Code – 9:29 / 2:32:58) In terms of construction and performance, the EOS R5 is comparable to Canon EOS 5D-series cameras while the EOS R6 is comparable to Canon EOS 6D-series cameras. Does either camera feature a built-in flash? No, but both cameras are compatible with Canon eTTL Speedlites and other compatible on- and off-camera flash systems. Canon Speedlite 470EX-AI Who are the target audiences for the R5 and R6? The R5 is a "Class 5" EOS camera, which is aimed at professionals, including portrait and wedding photographers, cinematographers, editorial shooters, and others requiring high resolution and maximum camera performance. (Video Time Code – 18:00 / 2:32:58) The R6 is aimed at photographers, vloggers, YouTubers, and other visual content producers who require high performance but do not necessarily require high pixel counts. Is either camera GPS enabled? (Video Time Code – 42:06) No. Are grips available for Canon's EOS R5 or R6? Both cameras are compatible with the BG-R10 Battery Grip, which makes handling a bit easier, especially for vertical shooting, and gives you space for two batteries to permit longer shooting times. Canon BG-R10 Battery Grip Alternatively, the R5 can be also used with Canon's WFT-R10A Wireless File Transmitter, which does double duty by serving as a network workflow asset. The WFT-R10A battery grip features vertically oriented control dials and a joystick for shooting in portrait mode. It's built to the same weather-proofing standards as the R5 and enables you to transfer image files using either wired or wireless LAN connections with FTPS, FTP, and SFTP support. The WFT-R10A also accepts two LP-E6/LP-E6NH batteries—one to power the camera and one to power the grip. Can you use Canon EF and EF-S lenses on the new R-series cameras without any performance issues? (Video Time Code – 18:57) Yes. EF and EF-S lenses can be adapted for use on the R5, R6, and other R-series cameras. Camera Sensors Do both cameras contain full-frame sensors and, if so, are they the same imaging sensors? (Video Time Code – 43:52) Both cameras feature full-frame CMOS sensors, though they are not the same sensors. The EOS R5 features a 45MP CMOS sensor. The EOS R6 features a 20MP CMOS sensor. Do either of these cameras have anti-aliasing (AA) filters? Yes. Canon's EOS R5 and R6 both employ anti-aliasing filters to reduce the possibility of recording moiré patterns when photographing fabric, textiles, and other subjects with repeat patterns. What about APS-C? Can they be set to shoot in APS-C mode Yes, both can be set to capture using a smaller APS-C (1.6x) area of the sensor; this will be automatically triggered if you're adapting EF-S lenses, too. Is the 20MP sensor in the R6 the same as the 20MP sensor in Canon's EOS-1D X Mark III? (Video Time Code – 7:40 / 2:32:58) No. The sensor in the R6 is based on the sensor in the 1D X Mark III, but it's not exactly the same sensor. Do the R5 and R6 share a common image processor? Yes. Both cameras feature Canon's latest DIGIC X image processor. Still Imaging What types of files do the new cameras capture? The R5 and R6 both record three file formats—JPEG, raw, and HEIF (High-Efficiency Image Format), which is a relatively new format that takes up less storage space on your memory cards compared to standard JPEGs, but isn't quite as well supported by editing programs just yet. Can the R5 and R6 be set to simultaneously record different file types or different resolutions to each of the camera's card slots? Yes, on all counts. What are the aspect ratios choices with the new cameras? Both cameras allow for capturing image files in 1:1, 3:2, 4:3, and 16:9 aspect ratios. Is focus stacking an option with either the EOS R5 or R6? Yes, though with a caveat. When set to Focus Stacking mode, both cameras automatically capture a series of stills at bracketed focus points. The resulting stills must be processed into the final focus-stacked image post-capture. Video (Video Time Code – 01:05:46) What are the video formats of Canon's EOS R5 and R6? (Video Time Code – 2:30 / 2:32:58) The EOS R5 supports DCI 8K 30 fps raw video recording internally, along with 4K recording up to 120 fps in 4:2:2 10-bit with Canon Log or HDR-PQ for in-camera HDR production. The EOS R6 offers UHD 4K video recording up to 60 fps, along with Full HD at 120 fps for slow-motion playback. Both formats can be recorded internally at 4:2:2 10-bit and both Canon Log and HDR-PQ are supported. Both cameras support external recording, via their HDMI ports, for clean 4K output at up to 60 fps. Also, it's worth noting that both cameras can make use of Dual Pixel CMOS AF II at all recording settings. (Video Time Code – 02:11:13) Is the 8K footage from the EOS R5 cropped or uncropped? (Video Time Code – 03:59) The footage is essentially uncropped in terms of width, and only cropped in height due to the 3:2 aspect ratio of the sensor. The UHD has to come in a little bit, but the footage is essentially uncropped. There's been some confusion concerning whether the R5 and R6 shoot at 24 fps? Do they? (Video Time Code – 4:14 / 2:32:58) This is a misconception. The R5 and R6 can both capture video at 24 fps in Full HD and 4K. When shooting video with the R5, is raw only available in 8K or is it also possible to shoot raw in 4K? Unfortunately, not. You can shoot H.265 4K, but no raw. Can you shoot video in Canon Log or Canon Raw with both the R5 and R6? You can capture video with Canon Log, but only the R5 offers raw recording, and only when set to 8K resolution. Do the R5 and R6 feature the same video shooting modes? The R5 allows you to shoot video in a full range of exposure modes, including Shutter and Aperture control and Custom modes. The R6 only allows you to shoot video in Program and Manual mode, leaving you with Auto ISO and 1/8-stop increment aperture control as workaround tools for exposure control. What are the specs for shooting slow motion video with the R5 and R6? The R5 can record 4K up to 120 fps and Full HD up to 60p with Canon Log, HLG, and HDR-PQ. The R6 can record 4K up to 60 fps and Full HD up to 120p with Canon Log, HLG, and HDR-PQ. Is it possible to record raw video to the CFexpress card while recording lower-res video to the SD card on the R5? Yes. The R5 allows you to record 8K raw to the CFexpress card and 4K DCI to the SD card simultaneously. Viewing Systems Do the R5 and R6 have the same viewing systems? Both cameras feature 0.76x-magnification OLED EVFs for eye-level viewing and rear LCDs, but the resolution of the EVFs and LCDs differ. The R5 features a 5.76m-dot OLED EVF and a 3.2" 2.1m-dot rear LCD. The R6 features a 3.68m-dot OLED EVF and a 3.0" 1.68m-dot rear LCD. To better emulate an OVF-like viewing experience, both cameras can be set to run at 120Hz for more fluid rendering of motion. Can the LCDs on the EOS R5 and EOS R6 be tilted? Both cameras feature Free-Angle Tilting LCDs, which, in addition to front-facing viewing, can be easily adjusted for working from high and low shooting angles. Autofocus (Video Time Code – 01:14:57) Do the R5 and R6 share the same autofocus system? (Video Time Code – 5:42 / 2:32:58) Yes. Both cameras feature Canon's newest Dual Pixel CMOS AF II autofocus system, which integrates dual photodiodes within each pixel that together vastly improve AF speed, accuracy, and subject tracking. How many autofocus points does the new AF system feature and what's the extent of the AF sensor's field coverage? (Video Time Code – 02:15:16) There are 1053 selectable focusing zones that between them enable nearly 100% field coverage vertically and horizontally for maximum focus control. Is it true the new AF system recognizes birds and other animals? Yes. The AF system in both cameras can recognize and lock focus onto the bodies of animals, specifically including birds. At closer ranges, the focus automatically transitions from body-AF to head and eye-AF for finer focus accuracy. The AF system on the R5 and R6 both feature "EOS iTR AF X" technologies. What is that and what does it do? EOS iTR AF X technologies are the basis of Canon's advanced AF systems. EOS iTR AF X incorporates advanced algorithms that analyze body types, face, and eye features, and use this data to track subjects while keeping them in sharp focus as they transverse the image field. What is the AF sensitivity range under low light on the R5 and R6? In stills mode, the R6 is rated to be accurate to light levels as low as-6.5 EV with an f/1.2 lens and-5 EV in video mode. The R5 is rated down to-6 EV for stills and-4 EV for video when used with an f/1.2 lens. Does the camera's touchscreen allow for touch-focus control? (Video Time Code – 01:26:31) Yes. How about focus-bracketing? Do either of the new cameras support focus bracketing? (Video Time Code – 27:43) The EOS R5 supports focus bracketing but the R6 does not. What other features are new or improved in the camera's new AF system? Deep Learning technology has been incorporated that vastly improves the AF system's ability to recognize the eyes, faces, and heads of not only people, but animals too! In the case of animals, the camera's AF system automatically switches from body-AF to eye-AF when the animal comes within a closer focusing range. Exposure Control What are the sensitivity ranges of the EOS R5 and R6? (Video Time Code – 01:02:29) Both cameras have a base of ISO 100. The R5 tops out at ISO 51200 and is expandable to ISO 102400. The ISO sensitivity of the R6 extends an additional stop to ISO 102400, and is expandable to ISO 204800. What are the highest continuous frame rates when shooting stills with the R5 and R6? (Video Time Code – 5:50 / 2:32:58) Both cameras can shoot up to 12 fps in mechanical shutter mode and up to 20 fps with the electronic shutter engaged. The difference between the cameras is that the R5 can buffer up to 180 raw files or 350 JPEGs with the mechanical shutter or 83 raw and 170 JPEG using the electronic shutter, while the R6, which produces smaller image files, can shoot up to 1000 JPEGs or 240 raw files at 12 fps with either a mechanical or electronic shutter. (Video Time Code – 02:07:53) What are the shutter speed ranges for the R5 and R6? (Video Time Code – 02:03:57) Both cameras have shutter speed ranges of 1/8000 to 30 seconds with a mechanical or electronic front curtain shutter, or 1/8000 to ½ second with an electronic shutter. Can the R5 and R6 be set for interval recording? Yes, both cameras can be set for interval recording. 5-Axis Sensor-Shift Image Stabilization Do the R5 and R6 feature in-body image stabilization (IBIS) and, if so, how many stops? Canon's EOS R5 and R6 both contain 5-axis sensor-shift image stabilization systems that compensate for up to 8 stops of camera shake when shooting handheld with select lenses. What does "5-axis sensor-shift image stabilization" mean? A 5-axis sensor-shift image stabilization system is a stabilization system that compensates for camera movement by micro-shifting the camera's image sensor in the opposite direction of the camera movement, which effectively cancels or greatly reduces the chance of blur in photographs taken at slower shutter speeds. What does "8 stops of image stabilization" translate to in real-world numbers? An 8-stop effective IS system means, for example, if you can normally hand-hold a lens at 1/500 sec, then 8-stop IS will enable you to theoretically handhold the same lens under the same conditions at ¼ sec and get equally sharp results. When shooting with IS-enabled EOS R lenses, does the IS system in the lens add additional stability to the camera's IBIS? Yes. When shooting with IS-enabled EOS R-series lenses, depending on the lens, you can realize up to a total of 8 stops of image stabilization. The IS system will use the lens's optical stabilization when possible and then provide additional support by shifting the sensor. Can I get the same combined image stabilization if I adapt IS-enabled Canon EF-mount lenses to an R5 or R6 camera? Not entirely. While Canon EF-mount lenses will work, and the image stabilization will be supported, it won't be to the same degree as native RF-mount lenses. Adapted EF-mount lenses will still offer optical image stabilization, and the camera will still use sensor-shift image stabilization to control shake, but it won't be as effective as 8 stops worth of camera shake reduction. EF Lens Compatibility (Video Time Code – 18:28 / 2:32:58) Are Canon EF lenses adaptable to Canon EOS R bodies? Yes, Canon EF lenses can be adapted to both the R5 and R6 by using Canon EF-EOS R lens adapters, which allow for seamless use of EF and EF-S lenses on EOS R cameras. Canon Control Ring Mount Adapter EF-EOS R When adapting Canon EF-S lenses on EOS R cameras, does the camera automatically crop to an APS-C format? Yes. What about AF performance? Do EF and EF-S lenses perform equally well when used on EOS R cameras or is there a noticeable drop in performance levels? (Video Time Code – 21:11, Video Time Code – 01:47:59) EF and EF-S lenses perform equally well when used on an R5, R6, or other EOS R-series camera. Wi-Fi What about Wi-Fi connectivity? Do both cameras offer similar options? The R5 offers 5 GHz and 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth, connectivity for transferring image files to mobile devices. The R6 only offers 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. The Canon Camera connect app uses both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to communicate—Bluetooth is for keeping the connection and Wi-Fi is for actual transfer. Bluetooth also acts as a remote trigger. (Video Time Code – 02:09:35) Are there any quicker, more powerful Wi-Fi options for either camera? The R5 can be used with Canon's WFT-R10A Wireless File Transmitter Grip, which in addition to enabling wired Ethernet and wireless LAN connectivity features the option of a faster 802.11ac/c 2x2 MIMO Technology connection for transfer speeds of up to 867 Mb/s. Standard 802.11b/g/n at 2.4 GHz and 802.11ac/a/n at 5 GHz can also be used depending on the network. Memory Cards Both cameras feature dual card slots. What types of cards do they use? (Video Time Code – 00:46:56) Both cameras feature dual memory card slots, but they use different combinations of card types. The R5 has slots for a single CFexpress Type B card and a single SD (UHS-II) memory card. The R6 has slots for dual SD (UHS-II) memory cards. Can I use SD UHS-I cards in the R5 and R6? Yes, of course. Most SD cards should work, but if you're recording 4K or 8K video or shooting in quick bursts, you should stick to UHS-II cards. Canon went as far as including the buffer capacity based on UHS-I and UHS-II memory cards in the R5/R6 spec sheets. Battery Life (Video Time Code – 13:50 / 2:32:58) Do the R5 and R6 use the same batteries? (Video Time Code – 14:11 / 2:32:58) Yes, both cameras use Canon's latest 16Wh LP-E6NH batteries. Older Canon LP-E6-type batteries can also be used. Canon LP-E6NH Lithium-Ion Battery How many exposures can we expect from the new LP-E6NH batteries? (Video Time Code – 32:24) In default mode, you can expect about 320 exposures per charge from the R5 when using the camera's EVF and about 490 exposures with the rear LCD. These numbers fall by about 30% when the camera is set to a higher viewfinder refresh rate. The R6 is rated at 380 exposures per charge when using the camera's EVF and about 510 exposures when using the LCD. These figures also go down by about 30% when the camera is set to a faster refresh time. Note, though, that these are tested and official numbers, but you might be able to get a greater number of shots per charge depending on the conditions in which you're working, how you're shooting, and which other camera settings you use or don't use. Can the LP-E6NH batteries be used in older Canon EOS cameras that normally use LP-E6/E6N batteries? (Video Time Code – 14:00) Yes, they can, but the increase in battery life will only be recognized when used in the R5 and R6. Similarly, older LP-E6/E6N batteries can be used in the R5 and R6 albeit with fewer exposures per charge. Did we miss anything? If you have other questions, let us know about them in the Comments section below and we'll get an answer for you ASAP.
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Posted 06/24/20
Today, anyone can create, and everyone can publish. Panasonic saw this trend and designed something specifically for this new breed of creators: the G100. It is a lightweight, powerful mirrorless Micro Four Thirds camera with a fully articulating touchscreen, advanced OZO Audio by Nokia, 4K video, and plenty of sharing-oriented recording features that will appeal to the vlogger in everyone. Panasonic Lumix G100 Mirrorless Digital Camera The Details Image quality is great—as it should be. The imaging pipeline is a familiar one to the G9 and GH series, so this is going to be a winner. The real differences come with the body design. For vloggers, there is perhaps nothing more important than having a flip-out screen. If you can't see yourself, you can't effectively shoot. The screen flips out to the side, can face front or back, and can even be tucked away for protection. It measures 3.0", has a 1.84m-dot resolution, and has a high brightness, making it useful when outdoors in bright sunlight. A vlogging-specific interface and Video Selfie Mode make using this device even easier by automating many processes. Image quality is superb, which is not surprising considering it is using a 20.3MP Micro Four Thirds MOS sensor and a Venus Engine—just like the GH5 and G9. This allows it to capture beautiful UHD 4K at 30p and Full HD at 60p with such a compact form factor. V-Log L comes built-in here, for advanced color grading and integration with other systems. It's also good for capturing stills. Panasonic Lumix G100- Sample Photos Image stabilization comes as standard with a 5-axis hybrid setup. This uses electronic stabilization from the camera as well as optical stabilization from compatible lenses. This should help smooth out your walking videos. It even works with 4K recording, though this drops down to 4 axes. Heading back to more content creation features, we have to discuss a lot more body design features. Related to the screen is the addition of a sharp, high brightness EVF. It has a 3.68m-dot resolution and should be no problem for recording footage on a bright day. To help with recording, the camera also has a nice large, red record button on the top next to the shutter. Autofocus has been upgraded to be faster and more effective at tracking faces and eyes. This will be huge for vlogging or doing interviews, as you can just let the camera do what it needs to do. For other speedy moments, the G100 has a Slow and Quick mode that can help you capture video at up to 120 fps in Full HD and get a nice, slowed down image straight out of the camera. For vlogging, the G100 features a brand-new microphone system, called OZO Audio by Nokia. What this does is use an array of three microphones at the top of the camera and smart software to focus the pickup pattern. The coolest application is the Tracking option. The camera's autofocus system will actually track your face and eye as you shoot and then adjust the audio system to make sure you are always coming in clear while the background noise does not. Other options include Surround, which appears to just capture everything around you; Front, which focuses in on anything in front of the camera and is perfect for interviews or vlogs; and Behind, which can help keep narration clean as you capture things in front of you. An Auto setting can switch between Tracking and Surround based on what it sees. If you want to use your own mic, there is a standard 3.5mm input. There is a lot of fun stuff packed into the menus and operation modes. For starters, when you hit Record there is a red box that shows up around the entire image that clearly tells you that you are recording. The G100 also has frame markers, which will make it easier to shoot for various platforms and social media sites. These include 5:4, 1:1, 4:5, and 9:16. Variable opacity will give you control over how much outside the frame video is visible. And, the camera will automatically tag video shot vertically so it plays back properly on your devices. Finally, it is worth talking about the sharing features. There is a button at the top that will help you quickly transfer stuff to your smartphone from the Playback menu. You'll need to connect to your device using Wi-Fi or Bluetooth using the Lumix Sync App. Combined with built-in tools to make capturing easier for finishing on your devices, this should streamline the creation process without needing a computer in the middle. If you want to make the most of the system, Panasonic has created the DMW-SHGR1 Tripod Grip. This mini tripod can also work as a handheld grip, and if you connect it to the camera you are given controls for the shutter, recording, and sleep. It's great for quickly setting up and moving around with the G100. You can get the camera and grip in a nice starter kit. On paper, this looks to be a stellar camera, especially if you want to upgrade your vlogs. The Hands-On Experience Honestly, the G100 matches what the specs on paper tell you. It is a great, compact mirrorless camera that is especially well suited to vlogging. The relatively large Four Thirds sensor will make a difference to your images in certain situations, and it manages to keep the camera size competitive with point-and-shoots commonly found in the industry. This camera feels good in the hand, it's lightweight, and it could easily squeeze into an everyday bag or even a jacket pocket with relative ease. It's not the smallest thing out there, but it's close enough, considering all the other advantages it brings. The audio system actually works surprisingly well. The lack of a windscreen means that you might struggle in windy conditions, but for the most part it delivers as promised. Setting to Front or Back provides the most clarity for speaking, and it does a great job. This really helps with most vlogging situations and is very helpful. Tracking is also sounding good, especially for walking and talking. I love the new content creation features. Having a big red box indicating you are recording just makes me feel so much better. It's an underrated feature I think everyone should adopt at least as an option in lieu of traditional tally lights. The different frame markers are also super helpful. Before that required having a good external monitor; now you can just see it right on the camera, and needing one less tool is always an advantage. Moving on to image quality, I can't say I'm surprised. It looks great. The optional color effects are also nice to have for quick workflows where minimal editing is desired. As for autofocus, this is where I was very surprised. It exceeds that of the ever-popular GH series. It caught my face and tracked with ease, even when I was using it as a webcam. Previous Pause Next Panasonic Lumix G100- Sample Photos Since it is all the rage these days, you can use the G100 as a webcam if you use the camera's HDMI output and have a capture device for your computer. It's a nice option to have, but I do wish that it was native or supported by Panasonic's Lumix Tether for Streaming (Beta). The HDMI out is also limited to Full HD 60p and turns off the camera's screen when in use. There is one point of disappointment from my hands-on review, and that is that I think the camera is being held back by the included kit lens. The lens is okay, but it is slow and lacks some cool features like power zoom. If you have any additional Micro Four Thirds lenses or are looking to pick some more up, this camera can unleash its full potential. To be fair, the lens choice keeps the camera tiny and affordable, but it is a limiting factor for something that is being billed as an all-in-one solution in the kit. The mini tripod was a nice touch, and if you aim to do vlogging I highly recommend going for the kit. It completes the package. Overall, I think this is a great system to start with vlogging, particularly because you can expand it later on with new lenses or even match it with more serious cameras. It's a standard format, which should help, and V-Log L will allow it to integrate into more serious workflows. I would only knock the lens, which can be easily swapped out if you want to get an even better image. What are your thoughts on the new Lumix G100? Are you thinking of giving it a try? Let us know in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 05/09/20
Dan Bailey discusses the benefits of FUJIFILM’s mirrorless cameras for outdoor, adventure, and travel photography. He also presents tips on lighting, lenses, and composition to get the most from your camera, no matter what kind of gear you use.
569 Views
Posted 02/26/20
We review the latest in FUJIFILM's X Series: the FUJIFILM X-T4. Derek Fahsbender and Doug Guerra give you their first impressions of this mirrorless camera, for photography and video. Features include FUJIFILM's IBIS (In-Body Image Stabilization), an improved mechanical shutter, adjustable flip screen, DCI 4K/60p and Full HD/240p super slow-motion video, and more. Learn more at B&H Explora More FUJIFILM camera reviews:- Fujifilm X-T3 Mirrorless Camera- FUJIFILM X-Pro3- FUJIFILM X-T200 vs. X-T100? Order the FUJIFILM X-T4 from B&H
371 Views
Posted 12/23/19
Sony recently unveiled the stunning a7R IV Mirrorless Camera. To help you better understand all the new capabilities of this release, join Josh Pomponio in the B&H Tech Corner, as he answers a ton of your questions. He covers the new sensor, upgraded autofocus, and all the latest video-recording options. Be sure to check back for the latest Q&As and leave any questions you still have in the Comments section, below!
225 Views
Posted 12/03/19
Join Josh Pomponio in the B&H Tech Corner to learn all about the Sony RX100 VII. This model has some distinct changes compared to its predecessor and even compares favorably to Sony’s flagship mirrorless cameras. Pomponio answers some of your most common questions and explains the newest features. Please leave a Comment, below, with any other questions you have and we will answer!
1062 Views
Posted 11/15/19
Th FUJIFILM X-Pro3 Mirrorless Camera has a retro feel, with its hidden LCD screen and simple dial system, to bring you back in the moment with your photography. Derek Fahsbender, from B&H, walks you through a hands-on review.
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