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Posted 04/15/21
The new DJI Air 2S is here! Featuring a powerful imaging system that includes a 1" CMOS sensor, all-new autonomous functions, as well as the ultralight design for which the Mavic Air series is known, the Air 2S appears to be the total package. It’s portable. It’s powerful. And if you’re an aerial photographer looking for the perfect all-in-one drone, the Air 2S might just be it. Super-Sized Sensor Although it shares the same family name as the Mavic Air 2, the Air 2S appears to be a significant upgrade over its predecessor. Chief among its enhancements is the new 1" CMOS sensor, which allows the Air 2S to shoot 5.4K30 and 4K60 video, as well as 20MP stills. The new sensor also supports many advanced imaging features, such as 10-bit color and RAW format photos, as well as several proprietary capture modes, including Intelligent HDR, Hyperlapse, and Panorama. Updates Galore In addition to the powerful new sensor, the Air 2S also includes the latest versions of several features and functions, including the newly released OcuSync 3.0, Active Track 4.0, and MasterShots—to name a few. OcuSync 3.0—or O3 as DJI calls it—is the latest iteration of DJI’s advanced image-transmission system. O3 recently made its debut with the DJI FPV drone, providing the reliably smooth images and ultra-low latency FPV flying requires. That same technology is available with the Air 2S, meaning it can consistently transmit clear, ultra-smooth 1080p footage from up to seven and a half miles away. DJI calls the new MasterShots feature the “next evolution of QuickShots,” the popular autonomous shooting feature that allows pilots to capture cinema-worthy footage with the single press of a button. The number of available QuickShots has grown over the years—from the original four we saw with the DJI Spark to the 10 now available in the DJI Air 2S. And with the increase in number came an increase in sophistication, image quality, etc. Hence, they are now “MasterShots.” Y’All Know Me, Still the Same Low g Of course, it wouldn’t be a Mavic Air if it wasn’t ridiculously lightweight. And despite the powerful new sensor, the Air 2S still weighs a mere 595g. That’s less than 30g heavier than the Mavic Air 2, despite having a camera several weight classes above it. Bottom line: You get all the convenience and portability of the Mavic Air 2, only with a better camera, better autonomous functions, and more advanced features. And with the  Air 2S Fly More Combo, you'll get essential accessories to complete the package and fly longer. In this session, DJI and marine wildlife filmmaker Roberto Ochoa will discuss how he’s been using the new drone on his latest adventures. Topics will include Ochoa’s history with drones, how he uses them to capture the world’s incredible marine life, and professional tips from Ochoa and DJI experts Stuart Cram and Donovan Davis. Share your thoughts about the new DJI Air 2S, down below, in the Comments section.
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Posted 03/02/21
Today, after months of anticipation, DJI unveiled its first-ever FPV drone: the DJI FPV. The official reveal comes almost a year after the rumors about the alleged first-person flyer began circulating through the Internet. Based on today's announcement, the wait appears to have been worth it. Not only is DJI's newest drone a high-speed, low-latency FPV racer, it also functions as a conventional flyer and aerial imager capable of shooting hi-res pictures and video up to 4K60. In other words, today, DJI didn't just announce a new drone. It announced a new drone category: the FPV hybrid. DJI FPV at a Glance Today's announcement gave us a lot to talk about, but for anyone who's interested in just the top-level specs and features, here are some of the highlights at a glance. As you read through the list, feel free to reference our FPV glossary if you a come across a word, phrase, or acronym you would like to know more about. General Features: Flight speed up to 87 mph Flight time up to 20 minutes Transmits video from up to 6.2 miles away 3 different flight modes (S, N, and M) for 3 different types of flight Obstacle sensing (available in N mode) Emergency brake and hover safeguard Modular design with replaceable gimbal, landing gear, and top shell FPV Features: 2 different FPV modes (Low-Latency and High-Quality) Less than 28ms of video transmission latency in Low-Latency mode 150° "Super Wide Angle" FOV (field of view) Acro (M) and self-leveling (S & N) modes available Supports DJI Goggles V2 and other select third-party headsets Supports new DJI Motion Controller for more intuitive FPV flight experience Aerial Imaging Features: 1/2.3" CMOS sensor Records 4K60 video Captures 3840 x 2160 still images RockSteady EIS (electronic image stabilization) Up to 120 Mbps bit rate Supports H.264 and H.265 video formats What's the Big Deal? It's hard to oversell the importance of today's announcement. Obviously, any time the Number One maker of anything builds something new, it's important. DJI is the Number One drone maker in the world, so whenever it announces a new product, that automatically makes it a big deal. But what makes this particular announcement even more impactful is that A) It shows that DJI is committed to growing its FPV catalog and B) It makes FPV flying much more accessible. OK, but How? So, here's the thing: FPV flying isn't easy. It requires more skill and technical understanding than any other type of flying. FPV racers, for example, have to know certain design specifics like the differences between brushed and brushless motors, what a PDB does, or whether they should install individual ESCs or go with a 4-in-1 stack. And that's just on the knowledge side of things. Actual FPV flying is even more demanding. True story: The first time I flew an FPV drone, I banked so hard that I literally fell out of my chair—that's how immersive FPV flying can be. The point is this: FPV flying is kind of a lot. It's intimidating. At first, it's not easy. And because of all the extra components and specialized equipment (and, yes, repairs), it can be more costly. Put those challenges together and you have a fairly sizable barrier to entry. Often, people don't take up FPV because there are too many obstacles in the way. Until now. One of the reasons the DJI FPV is such a big deal is because it effectively removes those barriers and concerns. Are you intimidated by all the moving parts and pieces commonly associated with an FPV system? That is totally understandable and totally no longer an issue. The DJI FPV "Fly More Combo" comes with everything you need to start true FPV flying (including FPV Goggles) right out of the box. Nothing to build, assemble, or solder. Are you worried about the degree of difficulty? Don't be. The DJI FPV comes with three different flight modes: M, S, and N. Both S and N modes feature specific safety protocols that will allow first-time pilots to get the hang of FPV flying. On top of that, DJI has introduced an emergency brake-and-hover feature that automatically stops the craft and returns it to a neutral hover. This one-button failsafe is available in all three flight modes, so even if you're flying in acro (S mode), you can "pull" the e-brake at any time to bail yourself out. Do you have commitment issues? The reason I waited so long to get into FPV flying is because I was afraid I wouldn't like it as much as regular flying, and then I'd be stuck with all this FPV equipment I never used, including my drone, which wasn't much use to me outside of a bando. But with the DJI FPV, you don't have to worry about that. The DJI FPV is a true hybrid, which means it isn't relegated to just one function. Yes, you can use it for high-speed, first-person thrills, but you can also take off the FPV goggles and leisurely soar through the sky using good ol' third-person perspective. Or you can use it to capture incredible aerial photographs and up to 4K60 video—which is something you just can't do with other FPV drones. In other words, you don't have to worry about getting the FPV and then not using it, because it basically does everything. And that's a very big deal. Motion Commotion In addition to the FPV drone, DJI also announced its new Motion Controller, which might be an even bigger deal than the first-person flyer. If you're wondering how that's possible, I invite you to look at this thing: Folks, this is a brand-new design—not just a new controller, a new controller design, with new, gesture-based functionality that allows you to control pitch, roll, and yaw simply by moving your hand. Goodbye stick input. Adios need for opposable thumbs. I now fly only by waving my hand around like a magician. Seriously, this is so cool I'm not sure I care how well it works. I hope it does work well. I hope it's as awesome as it appears. But even if it's not, this is still a revolutionary idea, and the fact that DJI is willing to push the envelope and try out new designs like this is really exciting. Yeah, but Is It Good? Based on what we saw today, there are plenty of reasons to believe the DJI FPV drone will be an absolute game changer. It comes with a lot of hats: racer, aerial cinematographer, hobbyist, etc. And on paper, it looks like it can do just about everything you'd want from a drone. But we've only just now seen this thing. We haven't tested it. We haven't flown it in the wild or used the 4K camera. There's a lot that can happen between the spec sheet and an airfield. So, with that in mind, we will say that while the new DJI FPV does indeed look incredible, we can't be certain how good it really is until we've tested it ourselves—which we will, very soon. Are you as excited by DJI's announcement as we are? Ready to take the leap into FPV? Share your thoughts with us in the Comments section, below. The DJI FPV is intended for customers who have previous experience flying drones. For pilots who do not have FPV experience, it is highly recommended they fly in either S or N mode. Only pilots who are experienced with FPV flying should attempt to fly the DJI FPV in M mode, which relies solely on manual stick input and does not offer any kind of obstacle avoidance, self-leveling, or automatic safeguard. Please always fly according to local laws and regulations.
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Posted 12/21/20
Jake reviews the new Autel EVO II 8K Drone, which builds upon the success of the EVO I with improvements in every way. With a variety of resolutions and frame rates (such as 25 fps 8K), you can achieve the cinematic drone footage you’ve always wanted. This drone also boasts a video ISO range of 100 to 6400, a stills ISO range of 100 to 3200, the ability to record HDR video at up to Ultra HD 4K resolution, phase detection autofocus, hyperlapse mode, and more. After watching the video,  click here to learn more about the Autel Robotics EVO II 8K Drone at B&H Explora. What do you think about the new EVO II 8K drone? Share your thoughts in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 11/04/20
Just in time for the holidays: DJI announces the highly anticipated Mini 2. The follow-up to last year’s popular Mavic Mini, the Mini 2 arrives with several impressive upgrades that should once again make it a hit this shopping season. Here’s everything you need to know about DJI’s latest miniaturized flyer. DJI MAVIC MINI 2 Same Size, Bigger Features In terms of its physical design, there’s not a whole lot separating the Mini 2 from the Mavic Mini. At less than 250g, it’s still tiny. Like the original, the Mini 2 also sports a foldable body that makes it incredibly portable and accessible. In fact, apart from a little color here, a new decal there, it’s pretty tough to tell the difference between the two. But differences there are. The first, and perhaps most significant, distinction between the Mavic Mini and the Mini 2 is that the Mini 2 can now shoot 4K video. There were very few criticisms of the original Mavic Mini, but one that did get some traction was that it could “only” capture 2.7K video. The Mini 2 resolves this criticism by offering 4K recording at 30 fps, along with 2x digital zoom. Digital zoom, by the way, is another video feature not supported by the original Mavic Mini. With the Mini 2, you get 2x digital zoom at 4K, 3x at 2.7K, and up to 4x digital zoom if you’re shooting FHD. For stills there is an improvement in the form of DNG raw support for higher-quality images and better post-production.    Another big upgrade is how the Mini 2 transmits images. Instead of the enhanced Wi-Fi system we saw in the Mavic Mini, the Mini 2 uses OcuSync 2.0 for image transmission. This dual-band system is a fairly significant upgrade, because it allows the Mini 2 to transmit images much farther—up to 10km unobstructed. OcuSync 2.0 also utilizes automatic frequency shifting, which means the Mini 2 is more resistant to transmission interference. Bottom line: The Mini 2 can transmit images farther and more effectively than its predecessor. Confirmation Bias Despite the notable upgrades, the Mavic Mini and Mini 2 do have quite a bit in common. In addition to the same general design as its predecessor, the Mini 2 boasts a similar 31-minute flight time, what appears to be the same 12MP image sensor, the same QuickShots, and more. All of these similarities are good things. They were standout features in the original Mavic Mini, so incorporating them (or a slightly better version) into the Mini 2 makes sense. Mini MIA OcuSync 2.0 and the ability to shoot 4K boost the already impressive Mini series into serious rare air. What was arguably the best, most sophisticated beginner’s/toy-size drone now appears to have that title completely locked down. There are some missing features we would have loved to see in the Mini 2 (follow-me tech and obstacle tracking, for example), but those will probably come the next time around. Regardless of what future generations hold, right now the Mini 2 looks like the top drone available for beginners who want the highest level of performance possible. DJI MAVIC MINI 2 The DJI Mini 2 and Mini 2 Fly More Combo are available now at B&H. What do you think about the new Mini 2? If you have the Mavic Mini, are you ready to upgrade? Let us know in the Comments section, below!
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Posted 04/27/20
Jake introduces the new DJI Mavic Air 2. This lightweight drone contains highly advanced features such as 48MP photos, 4K at 60 fps, 1080p at 240 fps, 8K Hyperlapse, HDR video, a 10km video transmission range, and up to 34 minutes of flight time. Additionally, the Air 2 has a newly designed controller and smartphone clamp.  Check out the video, then read more about the Air 2 on B&H Explora. And let us know what you think of the newest DJI drone in the Comments section below. DJI Mavic Air 2 sample photos: 
605 Views
Posted 10/30/19
Take a look at the DJI Mavic Mini in action! Photographer Jeff Rojas takes the latest drone from DJI out for a spin.
457 Views
Posted 03/29/18
B&H begins its coverage of NAB 2018 on April 8. Stay tuned to receive up-to-date news on the latest gear related to cinema, broadcast television, VR, drones, and more. Feel free to share your comments below.
33386 Views
Posted 07/26/17
In this video, Jake from B&H takes the brand new DJI Spark for a spin, and it just happens to be his first time flying a drone.  For a new pilot, the Spark features easy-to-use gesture controls, positioning systems, and tracking modes. Its extremely small size and light weight also make it one of the most portable drones around, plus it's capable of recording 1080p video.
64118 Views
Posted 11/14/16
Introducing the brand new DJI Mavic Pro. With DJI's years of expertise in drone technology, the Mavic squeezes 4K video and state-of-the-art tracking features into a drone that's small enough to fold up into a backpack.
749 Views
Posted 08/16/16
At the US National Drone Racing Championship right here in New York, we follow Brian Morris, aka BrainDrain, on his time as a professional drone racer.
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