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Posted 11/06/20
Filmmaker and photographer Joseph DiGiovanna shares his five tips on getting started making time-lapse images. You will learn how to create a time-lapse image using your smartphone or camera, as well as about additional gear you will need along with apps and programs (such as Lightroom, Premiere Pro, Time Lapse Assembler, After Effects, and LRTimelapse) you can use during post processing. For more time-lapse tips, turn to our article  Time-Lapse Tips and Tools, then share with us your own experiences with this creative form of photography in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 11/06/20
Black-and-white photography and the name Leica have a synergy unlike any other medium and camera company, which is why it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Leica has introduced its fourth camera in eight years to wear the Monochrom nameplate. What is interesting is that with the introduction of the new Leica Q2 Monochrom, Leica has expanded the Monochrom brand beyond its fabled M-series bodies to now include Leica’s popular Q-series cameras. Photographs © Allan Weitz 2020 The Leica Q2 Monochrom is a black-and-white-only camera based on Leica’s extremely popular Q2 color camera, and features nearly identical specs, including a 47.3MP full-frame sensor, Maestro II processor, high-res EVF, and so on. The Q2 Monochrom also features the same fixed Leica Summilux 28mm f/1.7 ASPH. lens, which was specifically designed for the Q-system. Unlike Leica M-mount lenses, which are designed for rangefinder cameras and do not focus close, a flip of a switch on the Q2 lens barrel enables close focusing down to 6.7" from the sensor plane. If you love black-and-white photography, you’ll love the images created by Leica’s new Q2 Monochrom. And this lens is sharp—real sharp, and with a pleasing degree of bokeh when set at wide apertures. Rather than a tulip-style lens shade, the Q2 Monochrom comes with a forward-tapered metal screw-on shade that does a very effective job of blocking stray light, while maintaining the sleek form factor of the camera. The Q2 Monochrom’s Summilux 28mm f/1.7 ASPH. focuses down to 6.7" from the sensor plane. For the times that 28mm is too wide for your tastes, you can go into the menus and digitally set the camera to record the fields-of-view of a 35mm (30MP), 50mm (14.6MP), or 75mm (6.6MP) lens. The files become progressively smaller as you “zoom in,” but with the possible exception of 75mm (6.6MP), the files have plenty of meat on the bones, considering the 47.3MP resolution of the full-frame sensor. Truth is, for online sharing, all of these file sizes are perfectly fine. If 28mm is too wide (top left), you can set the Q2 Monochrom to capture the scene at 35mm (top right), 50mm (lower left), or 75mm equivalent focal lengths (lower right). Even at high ISOs, at night, the Q2 Monochrom captures amazingly detailed image files. Design-wise, the Q2 Monochrom, which is manufactured in Germany, is minimalist and seductively gorgeous. Unlike the Q2, which has a black chrome finish, with white and red paint engravings on the lens barrel and that famous Leica red dot on the side of the lens, the Q2 Monochrom sports a flat black paint and textured black leatherette akin to the M-series Monochrom cameras. The new Leica Q2 Monochrom has the same stealthy matte-black finish and detailing as the Leica M10 Monochrom. Both are examples of exquisite industrial design and as seductive looking as it gets. The Q2 Monochrom also features gray and white painted engravings on the lens barrel instead of red and white paint, and there’s no red dot. The camera is as stealthy as it gets. You even have to look hard to find the nameplate. (It’s engraved in matte black on the accessory shoe.) If you seek attention when wandering about taking pictures, this is not the camera for you. You have to look hard to find the nameplate on this camera, and that’s part of its charm. Like the Q2, the body of the Q2 Monochrom is weather sealed (IP-52), as is the lens. The Q2 Monochrom is also the first Leica Monochrom camera that shoots 4K video—M Monochrom cameras shoot stills only. If 28mm is too wide, you can shoot at 35mm, 50mm, or 75mm crops (above image is at 75mm). For composing and reviewing stills and video, the Q2 Monochrom features a 3.68m-dot electronic viewfinder and a 1.04m-dot, 3.0" fixed touchscreen LCD. Both viewing options are fine, though I personally wish the LCD were a tilt screen for low-angle and above-the-head shooting. This street scene includes the side of a building brightly lit by unfiltered sunlight and street activity in deep shadow. It’s a piece of cake to open the shadows while maintaining fine detail from the Q2 Monochrom’s hefty DNG image files. Internally and function-wise, the Q2 Monochrom is one and the same as the full-color version of the Q2 Monochrom. Being monochrome-only, there are fewer menus to scroll through, but, otherwise, if you’ve shot with a Leica Q or Q2, you’ll have a zero learning curve. And if you’ve never shot with a digital Leica, you’ll find the Leica menus to be among the most user-friendly in the industry. The heart of the Q2 Monochrom is a full-frame 47.3MP CMOS sensor that, while similar to the sensor found in the standard Leica Q2, features a new micro-lens design and does not have a color array or low-pass filter. The new Q2 Monochrom is ideal for street shooting and travel. Unlike conventional color sensors in which individual pixels record specific color channels, which reduces the overall resolving power of the sensor, every pixel in Monochrom sensors is dedicated to recording only grayscale, which greatly increases the resolution and detail of the final image. This also increases the dynamic range of the sensor compared to the dynamic range of the standard Q2 (13 stops vs 11 stops on standard Q2 at ISO 200). Eliminating the color array also expands the sensitivity of the sensor from ISO 100 to 100,000, which is a stop higher than the Q2. The range of tonality combined with incredible detail separates Leica’s line of Monochrom cameras from the black-and-white conversions you get from conventional RGB sensors. Aside from the new monochrome sensor, the Q2 Monochrom shares all of the features and specs of the Q2, including a choice of JPEG, DNG (raw), or a combination of the two; burst rates up to 10 fps; DCI and UHD 4K video, as well as high-speed Full HD at 120 fps recording; optical image stabilization; and a leaf shutter with flash sync at speeds up to 1/500 second for all you fill-flash enthusiasts. And to facilitate sharing your pictures on social media, the Q2 Monochrom is Bluetooth and Wi-Fi enabled. Being a black-and-white-only camera, you won’t find any color settings in the camera’s menus, but you will find Sepia, Blue, and Selenium toning filters for adding a bit of mood and atmosphere to your stills and videos. The tones captured by the Q2 Monochrom are absolutely lifelike. The Q2 Monochrom is compatible with all of its sister ship accessories, along with a few new toys of its own. New for the Q2 Monochrom is a Q2 Monochrom Handgrip (highly recommended if I may say so myself!) and three 49mm black-and-white filters: green, orange, and yellow. So how does the new 47MP Q2 Monochrom stack up against the 40MP M10 Monochrom? Interestingly, according to initial tests (as well as my own test comparisons), the dynamic range of the files is quite close, but the files from the Q2 Monochrom have a slight edge when it comes to resolution. It’s not a major difference, but a difference, nonetheless. Previous Pause Next Leica Q2 Monochrom Sample Images The new Leica Q2 Monochrom should be available at B&H as you read this. Are you a fan of black-and-white photography? Have you had an opportunity to try any of Leica’s Monochrom cameras? If so, we’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 11/03/20
Canon is appealing to serious everyday photographers with the launch of two compact and versatile lenses for its full-frame mirrorless system, along with a new 13" inkjet photo printer. The RF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM and RF 50mm f/1.8 STM lenses both represent smaller and lighter-weight alternatives to the top-of-the-line lenses and prioritize sleeker designs for all-day handheld use. And for high-end photo printing from home, the PIXMA PRO-200 is the newest-generation inkjet printer featuring an updated 8-color ink system and a more intuitive interface. RF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM Characterized by its sleeker design and fine-tuned optics, the RF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM is a fresh take on a popular telephoto zoom. It’s slower than the f/2.8 version, sure, but this f/4 makes up for it with an impressively lightweight and compact design, weighing just 1.5 lb and measuring less than 5" long. Its constant f/4 maximum aperture also contributes to the svelte design, and a 5-stop effective Optical Image Stabilizer helps to control camera shake. Additionally, this 70-200mm still retains its L-series designation and is weather sealed for use in harsh conditions. Canon RF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM Lens The 70-200mm lens is a popular choice for events, portraiture, and even sports shooting, and it covers an incredibly useful range of telephoto focal lengths for various circumstances. Optically, this 70-200mm doesn’t skimp on specialized glass; featuring four ultra-low-dispersion (UD) elements, chromatic aberrations and color fringing are well controlled for high clarity and color accuracy. An Air Sphere Coating has been applied, too, to suppress flare for greater contrast when working in strong light. Complementing the optics, this zoom also sports a Dual Nano USM focusing system, which promotes fast and quiet focusing performance for photo and video needs. Previous Pause Next Canon RF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM Sample Photos RF 50mm f/1.8 STM An essential if ever there was one, the RF 50mm f/1.8 STM is Canon’s latest take on the compact and versatile “nifty fifty” lens. Updated for the full-frame mirrorless system, this new normal-length prime features a revised optical design and optimized coatings for high sharpness, clarity, and accurate rendering. An STM autofocus system also promotes fast and quiet performance to suit multimedia needs. Canon RF 50mm f/1.8 STM Lens The compact 50mm lens has long been one of those go-to lenses for a variety of shooting needs. Its normal focal length suits everything from street shooting to landscape to portraiture, and the f/1.8 maximum aperture strikes an ideal balance between a compact design and being bright enough for available light shooting. Even if you’re primarily a zoom shooter, the 50mm f/1.8 has a place in every bag as the sleeker alternative for fun walkaround photography. Previous Pause Next Canon RF 50mm f/1.8 STM Sample Photos PIXMA PRO-200 Perfect for the home office or studio, Canon has also released the next-generation PIXMA PRO-200, an update to the immensely popular 13" wireless inkjet photo printer. The PRO-200 utilizes a new 8-color dye-based ink system for rich, vibrant, and accurate color handling that is suitable for fine art printing applications. Borderless printing is possible from 3.5 x 3.5" up to 13 x 19", and custom-size printing up to 13 x 39" is possible for panoramic output. The printer also supports both wired connections, using either Ethernet or USB, or wireless printing over Wi-Fi for easy integration into your home workspace. As a printer designed for at-home use, its small footprint is suitable for desktop placement, and an intuitive 3.0" color LCD is featured on the front of the printer for quickly checking ink levels and printer status messages. Beyond improved quality, the PRO-200 also received a speed boost, and is now capable of outputting bordered 8 x 10" prints in just 53 seconds or bordered A3+ prints in 90 seconds. Also, it’s compatible with Canon’s Professional Print & Layout Software for a seamless printing workflow. What are your thoughts on Canon’s newest releases? Are you looking forward to this new 70-200mm f/4 or are you more of a nifty fifty shooter? And let us know what you think about the new PIXMA PRO-200 inkjet and at-home printing in general, in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 10/30/20
Jessica Hirsch, aka @Cheat Day Eats, shares five of her favorite food photography tips, such as photoshoot prep, lighting, composition, and more. Whether you run a food blog or want to up your social media game, these tips will be helpful to you! What are some of your tricks for photographing food? Tell us about them in the Comments section, below! Similar photography and video tutorials: 5 Tips for Better Beverage Photos with Steve Giralt Food Videos at Home: How to Make a Recipe Video for Social Media How to Make Fake Ice Cream for Food Photography
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Posted 10/29/20
ZEISS has introduced the ZX1, the first camera that allows you to take a photograph, edit it in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, and share the results… all in-camera! Intended for a number of shooting genres, most notably travel, street, and landscape, the ZX1 is a compact camera sporting a high-resolution 37.4MP full-frame CMOS sensor and a fixed Distagon T* 35mm f/2 lens. The ZX1 has an elegantly minimalist wedge-shaped, stealth-black body, which measures a very palmable manageable 5.6 x 3.7 x 3.7" and weighs 12.7 oz, including battery. It features a 0.7" OLED EVF, with Full HD resolution and a large 0.74x magnification, as well as a huge 4.3" touchscreen LCD with a 1280 x 720 resolution for image review and in-camera editing. JPEGs and raw (DNG) files can be edited by touch using the built-in Lightroom app, which offers intuitive sliders to adjust exposure, contrast, highlights, shadows, whites, and blacks, as well as other familiar editing tools. To facilitate sufficient storage space to handle in-camera picture editing in Lightroom, the ZX1 also has the unique distinction of including an internal 512GB SSD; additional external storage space can be accessed via USB-C with NAS access using SMB protocols. This omission of a memory card slot in favor of built-in storage is a unique solution to avoiding lost or damaged cards and also ensures memory speeds will always be at their peak in relation to the imaging system. Additionally, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity are available for wireless sharing and remote camera control, as well as OTA firmware updates when needed. Among other unique traits of this already-unique camera, the ZX1 features a leaf shutter, with shutter speeds ranging from 30 seconds up to 1/2000 second, with flash sync available at all speeds up to 1/1000 second. The leaf shutter design has the advantages of being especially quiet and keeping internal vibrations to a minimum to promote stealthier shooting. Also, manually adjustable ISO settings are accessible via the top physical dial, with a range of ISO 80-51200. In addition, the camera's autofocus system is a hybrid contrast-/phase-detection AF system with touch focus and manual focus override. Beyond photo, it's worth mentioning that the ZX1 is a capable tool for video, too, with support for UHD 4K recording up to 30 fps or FHD up to 60 fps. All-in-all, the ZEISS ZX1 is one of the more unique cameras available, taking the concept of having an advanced point-and-shoot camera, but then adding a high-resolution full-frame sensor, impressive ZEISS prime lens, and then further tweaking it to have a large LCD screen, built-in memory, and even a copy of Adobe Lightroom for on-board editing. It's essentially an all-in-one camera, replacing the need to have a separate body and lens—as well as even replacing the need to have separate memory cards or a computer to process your files. For minimalist travel, it's certainly an enticing option. According to ZEISS, the ZX1 will be available for purchase during the upcoming holiday season. Previous Pause Next ZEISS ZX1 Sample Images What are your thoughts on this distinct camera? How do you feel about editing your photos with Lightroom directly from the camera? Do you like the idea of an "all-in-one" camera? Let us know your thoughts in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 10/23/20
Steve Giralt shares his tips on how to upgrade your beverage photos and videos, from lighting techniques to food styling. Watch this video, then tell us about your own food photography tips and tricks in the Comments, below. Similar tutorials: How to Make Fake Ice Cream for Food Photography Product Photography at Home: Beginner to Advanced Photography Tips: 3 Quick Tips Splash Photography at Home: Photo Shoot and Photoshop Tutorial Focus Stacking for Product Photography: From Photo Shoot to Photoshop Food Videos at Home: How to Make a Recipe Video for Social Media
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Posted 10/16/20
Maria shares her family portrait photography tips, from planning to poses. In this tutorial, you’ll gain insight and inspiration for your next family photoshoot. Similar photography tutorials: How to Pose Families During a Photoshoot Mastering the Family Portrait | Jennifer Borget Portrait Photography at Home: Photography Tips for Beginners Portrait Photography While Social Distancing
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Posted 10/13/20
After such a strong freshman effort, Nikon is back with the sophomore release of the Z 6II and Z 7II full-frame mirrorless cameras. Recognizing the initial strengths, the second generation of these foundation cameras for Nikon focuses on improving and evolving an already strong feature set and design language. Faster processing, quicker shooting rates, and fine-tuned design elements are all featured with these v. II models, yet they also retain the same beloved ergonomics and image quality. Nikon Z 6 II Nikon Z 7 II When the original Z 6 and Z 7 were released nearly two years ago, they were groundbreaking cameras that effectively signaled Nikon's commitment to mirrorless. They were the first full-frame, or FX-format, mirrorless models in Nikon's lineup and they were the first two models featuring the then-new Z lens mount. Nikon has since added a couple more Z-system models, but the Z 6 and Z 7 have stayed the course as the top-of-the-line models, until today. Nikon Z 6II Nikon Z 7II 24.5MP FX Format (With Optical Low Pass Filter) Sensor 45.7MP FX Format (No Optical Low-Pass Filter) Dual EXPEED 6 Processors Processor Dual EXPEED 6 Processors Up to 14 fps Continuous Shooting Up to 10 fps 124 Shots Buffer 50 Shots ISO 100-51200 ISO ISO 64-25600 UHD 4K 30p (60p available via future firmware update) FHD 120p Full Pixel Readout Video UHD 4K 60p FHD 120p 273 On-Chip Phase-Detection (90% Frame Coverage) Focus Points 493 On-Chip Phase-Detection (90% Frame Coverage) 5-Axis In-Body VR Image Stabilization 5-Axis In-Body VR 1x CFexpress Type B, 1x SD UHS-II Memory Card Slots 1x CFexpress Type B, 1x SD UHS-II 3.6m-Dot OLED EVF Viewfinder 3.6m-Dot OLED EVF 3.2" 2.1m-Dot Tilting Touchscreen LCD Monitor 3.2" 2.1m-Dot Tilting Touchscreen These second-gen cameras, much like the first gen, are mostly similar but have a couple of distinguishing features to suit different types of shooters. The Z 6II is the all-around, multimedia model positioned for the photographer/videographer/do-it-allographer. It has a full-frame 24.5MP BSI CMOS sensor that places it in the proverbial sweet spot for speed and resolution, and has a sensitivity range of ISO 100-51200. Dual EXPEED 6 image processors bring a 3.3x larger buffer than the original Z 6, for recording up to 124 consecutive frames versus the 37 frames of the old model, along with a faster 14 fps continuous shooting rate with single-point AF or 12 fps with other AF modes. Nikon Z 6 II Mirrorless Digital Camera In terms of video recording, UHD 4K at 30 fps with full pixel readout is supported immediately, with 60p support coming via a future update. External 10-bit recording is available, too, along with N-Log and HLG (HDR) recording modes, and an optional firmware update will be available in the future to add 12-bit raw recording via an Atomos recorder. The Z 6II's sensor also incorporates 273 on-chip phase-detect focusing points that cover approximately 90% of the frame. Previous Pause Next Nikon Z 6 II Sample Images The Z 7II, on the other hand, is the more specialized model of the two, due to its higher-resolution 45.7MP BSI CMOS sensor, which lacks an optical low-pass filter for higher sharpness and definition. Dual EXPEED 6 processors are featured here, too, which afford a 2.2x larger buffer than the original Z 7, an impressive 10 fps continuous shooting rate, and a versatile ISO 64-25600 sensitivity range. Nikon Z 7 II Mirrorless Digital Camera Despite the higher resolution, the Z 7II is still a capable video camera, with immediate support for UHD 4K up to 60 fps, along with 10-bit external recording, N-Log, and HLG support. Additionally, the sensor includes 493 phase-detection AF points that also cover approximately 90% of the frame for high accuracy. Previous Pause Next Nikon Z 7 II Sample Images Differences aside, the similarities between the two cameras are numerous and impressive. With both cameras now touting dual image processors, Nikon claims the 3.6m-dot OLED EVFs have greatly reduced blackout times and more fluid motion rendering. Like the predecessors, the cameras have a 3.2" 2.1m-dot tilting touchscreen, and Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity enable wireless remote control and image transferring, as well as firmware updating via Snapbridge. In-body 5-axis image stabilization is featured again for sharper handheld shooting, and low-light AF performance has been improved with sensitivity down to-4.5 EV. One change that's sure to make everyone happy is a new dual memory card slot design, including one CFexpress Type B slot and one UHS-II SD slot, for flexible storage needs. Some other notable updates for gen II: the cameras support full-time external power via USB Type-C and allow you to change the direction of the manual focus ring; Wide-Area AF has been added with Eye Detect support; timed long exposures up to 900 seconds are possible; and creative recording modes, such as slow motion FHD 120p video, multiple exposure stills, Focus Shift mode, and in-camera time-lapse recording, help extend the range of possible uses. What are your thoughts on the second-generation Nikon Z 6II and Z 7II mirrorless cameras? What's your favorite new feature from these cameras? What would you like to see Nikon add to the next iteration? Let us know your thoughts in the Comments section, below. If you are looking for more information, check out a recording of our launch even below. This launch panel featured B&H experts Derek Fahsbender and Robert Sansivero, Nikon product manager Mark Cruz, and professional photographers Joe McNally and Charmi Pena. They covered top features of the cameras, why they like the new cameras, and answer some common questions—so be sure to check it out.
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Posted 10/13/20
Canon has announced a new powerful on-camera flash unit with a xenon bulb for consistent output and a rechargeable Li-ion battery that will enable up to 335 flashes per charge. Designed for professionals and advanced amateurs, the Canon Speedlite EL-1 provides a Guide Number of 197' at ISO 100 and 200mm, which is comparable to that of the 600EX II-RT Speedlite. Canon Speedlite EL-1 The new EL-1 has a range of 24-200mm with a fast recycling time of 0.1-0.9 seconds. It also features an LED modeling lamp with adjustable brightness and color temperature controls. With a fully charged battery, the modeling light will run for three hours and can be turned on and off by double-tapping the camera’s shutter button. This impressive flash unit brings with it an improved user interface with a new LCD panel, a menu system with simplified options and control layout, as well as a new joystick controller. Efficiency features such as an active cooling system and improved thermal management enable longer operation times, and its power-output range, from 1/8192 to 1/1, provides versatile and power-saving settings when needed. Built to be strong, the EL-1 offers the same dust and water resistance as Canon EOS-1D series cameras and features a new high-durability glass flash tube. The flash head can swivel a full 180° with bounce up to 120° and provides a built-in catch light panel and wide-angle panel. The SBA-EL Bounce Adapter and SCF-EL Color Filter Set  are included, and the EL-1 is compatible with the Canon RT series of Speedlite products. Wireless second-curtain sync is supported, and the CP-E4N Battery Pack is compatible. Finally, the new rechargeable LP-EL Battery Pack that comes with the EL-1 utilizes the same LC-E6 Battery Charger used to charge the batteries on numerous Canon cameras. EOS M50 Mark II Mirrorless Digital Camera Canon has also announced the new EOS M50 Mark II Mirrorless Digital Camera, which is an upgrade of the EOS M50 featuring dual pixel CMOS AF improvements aimed at enticing content creators and vloggers. The new M50 Mark II still provides impressive 24.1MP image quality and the powerful DIGIC 8 image processor, as well as 4K UHD 24p and HD 120p for slow-motion video, but autofocus and Eye Detection advancements now enable faster focus lock and eye recognition at greater distances. Eye Detection can also be used during video with Movie Servo AF and you can use Eye and Face Detection during Servo AF. EOS M50 Mark II Mirrorless Digital Camera Paired with EOS Webcam Utility software, the M50 Mark II can be used as an easy webcam alternative, and the camera offers clean HDMI output for high-resolution, high-frame-rate streaming. The vari-angle touchscreen LCD is convenient for vlogging with Touch Record Control and enables versatile composition viewing including Vertical Video. The M50 Mark II has a 2.36 million dot OLED EVF, Silent mode for quiet operation and, of course, built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. It is available as a body only or paired with a 15-45mm lens in a white or black finish. PowerShot ZOOM Compact Telephoto Monocular Also new from Canon is the PowerShot ZOOM Digital Camera, which is a pocket-size telephoto monocular that captures 12MP still images and Full HD 1080 30p video. This lightweight and easy-to-use scope has a three-way one-touch switchable button that provides 100 to 400mm optical zoom and 800mm digital zoom. Continuous autofocus in viewing mode and Face Tracking in video mode help you stay right on the subject, whether you are viewing wildlife or a sporting event, or even while hiking or at the beach. Optical image stabilization helps maintain a steady and shake-free image. The ZOOM features a 0.39", 2.3 million dot, 59.94 fps electronic viewfinder, as well as a built-in microphone, USB C port, and microSD card slot. It is outfitted with built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth technology for LiveView and easy download to your smartphone via the Canon Camera Connect App. PowerShot ZOOM Digital Camera Ask any questions in the Comments section, below, and let us know which of these new Canon imaging products interest you the most.
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Posted 10/13/20
FUJIFILM's new X-S10 mirrorless digital camera packs an impressive set of features for hybrid photo and video creators into a lightweight yet ergonomic body. An APS-C format 26.1MP BSI sensor, 5-axis in-body image stabilization, and the ability to record 4K video all set in a body 30% lighter than past X-series cameras make this camera an excellent choice for on-the-go creatives. It is also available kitted with a 16-80mm or 18-55mm lens.  Accompanying the X-S10 is the updated XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS WR lens, which now features dust and weather sealing, an additional stop of image stabilization, and an updated aperture ring. FUJIFILM X-S10 Mirrorless Digital Camera The X-S10 uses a 26.1MP BSI X-Trans CMOS 4 sensor to create the kind of high resolution and color-accurate images for which FUJIFILM cameras have become known. Its quad-core X-Processor 4 CPU enables the X-S10 to achieve focus in less than 0.02 seconds and shoot continuously at up to 20 fps. Responsive Tracking, Face, and Eye-Detection autofocus take the onus of keeping your subject in focus off your shoulders. For scenarios that require immediate action, the X-S10 also includes an updated Auto/Scene Positioning mode for fast and intuitive capture. Finally, a working sensitivity range of ISO 160-12800, expandable to ISO 80-51200, equips the X-S10 to tackle a variety of lighting environments. Optimized for handheld shooting, the X-S10 incorporates a noticeably deep grip into its build for confident handling with various lens sizes. This is complemented by 5-axis in-body image stabilization (IBIS), which provides up to 6 stops of compensation so you can shoot at lower than usual shutter speeds or attach long lenses without worry. For ultimate stability, combine it with any of FUJIFILM's OIS system lenses for even greater stabilization benefits. A final level of protection is provided by a mechanical shock absorber, which prevents vibrations from the camera's shutter from affecting images. The X-S10 follows the trend of hybrid mirrorless cameras designed for today's generation of still and video creators and includes a 180-degree vari-angle touchscreen LCD that makes it easy to monitor capture and make adjustments from behind or in front of the camera. The X-S10 offers DCI/UHD 4K recording up to 30p as well as Full HD recording up to 240p for super-slow motion applications, and a micro-HDMI port allows external 4:2:2 10-bit color using an optional recorder. Additionally, 4-axis digital image stabilization is also applicable to video capture to minimize shake during handheld use. Following in the tradition of past FUJIFILM mirrorless cameras, the X-S10 incorporates 18 film simulation modes for analog converts. New with this camera is the ETERNA Bleach Bypass simulation, a desaturated, high-contrast look perfect for creative applications. Alongside the X-S10 camera is the freshly updated XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS WR lens, a fast zoom with a 15-36mm equivalent focal length range that is perfect for landscape, architectural, street, and other wide-angle applications. While maintaining the same optical design that made this lens popular upon its first release, the new version adds dust and weather sealing so you can use it in less-than-ideal conditions without fear. The updated version also offers improved stability in the form of an additional stop of stabilization, making it capable of 3.5 stops of vibration reduction. An aperture lock has also been added, and the aperture and focusing rings have been reduced in size. What do you think of FUJIFILM's latest camera and lens? Share your thoughts in the Comments section, below!
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