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Posted 04/06/21
Oozing all the retro style you’d expect from FUJIFILM, the new INSTAX Mini 40 is the latest sleek and fun camera in the company’s INSTAX instant film lineup. Despite its trendy and classic appearance, the Mini 40 is built to be as intuitive as possible for an instant film camera—it’s really just a point-and-shoot in the clearest sense of the term. It’s a stylish camera that’s fun to use, easy to carry, and perfect for producing those oh-so-shareable miniature prints with your friends. The INSTAX Mini 40 is the latest in FUJIFILM’s every-growing line of instant film cameras, and it takes the popular INSTAX Mini film. This small rectangular film format measures 2.4 x 1.8", or roughly about the size of a credit card. Functionally, the camera operates like many others from the INSTAX lineup—it has an optical viewfinder, a 60mm f/12.7 lens, and a built-in flash that works in conjunction with the auto-exposure metering and automatic shutter speed adjustments to help ensure every shot turns out just right. The Mini 40 is also fitted with a dedicated Selfie Mode, which is really just a close-focusing setting for working with subjects within an 11.8-19.7" range, or what amounts to about arm’s length. There’s a mirror attached to the front of the lens to help line up those selfies accurately, too. What else does the INSTAX Mini 40 bring to the table? Its classy, good looks, of course. Fundamentally, the Mini 40 isn’t a dramatically different camera than other INSTAX Mini offerings, but it is a desirable mixture of all the things that make INSTAX shooting so much fun in the first place. What are your thoughts on FUJIFILM’s latest instant film camera? Are you a fan of the retro styling and simple operation? Let us know your thoughts in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 03/25/21
Sandra Coan shares her portrait photography tips for creating natural-looking, soft light using strobes. Coan uses this one-light setup in her family and newborn photography. What kind of portrait lighting is your favorite? What do you use to light portraits? Share your own tips and techniques in the Comments section, below, and be sure to come back to BandH.com for many more of our engaging videos.
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Posted 03/25/21
Never afraid to be unique, Sigma has just released the fp L mirrorless camera. The second member of the fp Series of compact, modular, hybrid cameras, the fp L storms in with an all-new, higher-resolution sensor, improved focusing performance, and even brings an accessory electronic viewfinder to the system. When the original fp was released in 2019, it stood out due to its minimal design and distinct feature set that clearly catered more to video applications over stills. The fp L is a revised take on this approach, with more attention given to photography needs, overall speed, and even handling, without giving up its characteristically small stature and customizable ergonomics. Using the 61MP sensor to show off detail and texture. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. The Top Features What are the new features the fp L brings to the plate? Here’s everything you need to know in quick form. Full-frame 61MP BSI CMOS sensor: Up from the 24MP sensor of the original model, the higher-res sensor boosts detail while still keeping an impressive dynamic range and sensitivity range. Its back-illuminated design also yields an especially clean image with low noise. Phase-detection and contrast-detection AF: Compared to the contrast-detection-only design of the original, the hybrid focusing system of the fp L proves to be faster, better for tracking moving subjects, and more precise in tricky lighting conditions. There’s now an EVF for the system: The EVF-11 Electronic Viewfinder is an accessory component for both the fp L and the fp and is a 3.68m-dot OLED panel with a 90° upward tilting design for low-angle shooting. It’s available in a bundle with the fp L or separately for use with existing bodies. Same exact body design as the original fp: Not necessarily a new feature but, rather, a reaffirmation of the successful design of the compact and portable form factor of the first fp. This also means that all previous accessory grips, cages, the hot shoe unit, and loupe are all compatible with the new model. Continuous power via USB-C: The original fp allowed charging the battery inside the camera while it was turned off. The fp L lets you continuously power the camera via USB-C, which is perfect for time-lapse work, recording longer clips, or for working with the camera in a stationary position, like if using it as a webcam. Improved focusing speeds help catch a quick-moving train. Taken with the 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Contemporary lens. A Look Back Before digging more into the new features of the fp L, it’s important to take a look at Sigma’s history of camera design, and why the fp feels like a significant step for the company as a camera manufacturer. Prior to the original fp, Sigma was best known for its use of Foveon sensors, which are still to this day among the most unique sensors available due to their immense color depth and sharpness, albeit with the tradeoffs of reduced sensitivity, dynamic range, and higher noise levels. The fp from 2019 was Sigma’s first camera to adopt the more conventional Bayer array sensor, which offers improved flexibility in terms of dynamic range and sensitivity; as well as benefits video recording capabilities. More than the unique-for-Sigma Bayer sensor, the original fp stood out in the field of mirrorless camera designs for a number of other reasons: It’s still one of the most compact full-frame models available; it doesn’t contain a physical shutter, rather relying on an electronic shutter function; and it’s designed to be modular so each user can build the camera up however they see fit—two different hand grip options are available from Sigma, along with a loupe viewfinder, an accessory hot shoe, compatible third-party cages and grips, and so on. Late afternoon scene mixing harsh, deep shadows with bright, sunlit surfaces. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. Looking Forward The fp L doesn’t stray from these unique features but does offer a wealth of refinements to push this bold release further, especially with how photographers approach the concept of a modular and multimedia camera. The original fp didn’t quite click with many photographers due to its relatively slow focusing performance, the lack of an electronic viewfinder, and because of the lack of a built-in hot shoe and subsequently cumbersome method for working with flash. Responding to this, Sigma made sure to address most of these points—faster phase-detection focusing and a new accessory EVF—although it still has the electronic shutter only design, and associated 1/15-second flash sync speed, and likely won’t be anyone’s first camera choice for flash photography applications. Conversely, though, the plus side to omitting a physical shutter from a camera’s design is the smaller, lighter-weight design, quiet operation, and theoretically improved durability since there are fewer moving parts. Assuming you’re a photographer who can forgo the need for faster flash sync, then the fp L rewards with the sensor design that includes phase-detection AF for accurate moving subject tracking. In use, this felt like one of the more apparent upgrades over the fp, along with the higher resolution. Focusing is snappier and more accurate, regardless of the type of subject with which you’re working. The 61MP sensor is great for picking out and emphasizing details in ordinary scenes. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. And then there is the 61MP resolution, which puts the fp L squarely in the realm of an objectively high-resolution camera. In practice, this spec is sometimes a bit too much resolution, but I don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing. With the spare resolution, so to speak, Sigma also incorporated a new Crop Zoom feature for “zooming into” the scene by simply cropping in from the full-frame image area. It’s a nice tool to have in-camera, since you can preview the look of a tighter crop while shooting, especially if you’re just working with a single lens that’s a bit too wide for the shot you want. In addition to the major updates, the fp L also received some more minor, but welcomed, additions: There is now a true 24.00 fps frame rate for video recording, Duotone and Powder Blue color modes have been added, custom camera settings can be saved and shared to other cameras via a QR code, you can take screenshots of the camera’s rear LCD, and the Director’s Viewfinder has been updated with new cine cam models and custom frame line options. More emphasis on details with this shot of peeling paint just before sunset. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. fp L vs fp Comparing the fp L to the original fp, you’ll see the few changes between the models and how they look on paper. The interesting thing about comparing the two cameras, though, is that most of the differences are just an “on paper” matter, since they share the same body design and user interface. On the other hand, this comparison goes to show how just a few changes to a camera’s spec list can truly shake up how one interprets a camera. fp L fp 61MP BSI CMOS 36 x 24mm; Bayer Array Sensor 24.6MP BSI CMOS 35.9 x 23.9mm; Bayer Array UHD 4K up to 30p FHD 1080 up to 120p CinemaDNG 8-bit recording Video (Internal) UHD 4K up to 30p FHD 1080 up to 120p CinemaDNG 8-bit recording DCI 4K at 24p Raw 12-bit recording Video (External) DCI 4K at 24p Raw 12-bit recording Phase-detection and contrast-detection Autofocus Contrast-detection only ISO 100-25600 Expandable ISO 6-102400 Base ISO—Stills: ISO 100/400 Base ISO—CinemaDNG 12-bit and raw output: ISO 100/1250 Base ISO—MOV/CinemaDNG 10-bit, 8-bit: ISO 100/250 ISO Sensitivity ISO 100-25600 Expandable ISO 6-102400 Base ISO—Stills: ISO 100/640 Base ISO—CinemaDNG 12-bit and raw output: ISO 100/3200 Base ISO—MOV/CinemaDNG 10-bit, 8-bit: ISO 100/640 Electronic shutter 1/8000 sec to 30 sec Bulb up to 300 sec Flash sync up to 1/15 sec Shutter Speed Electronic shutter 1/8000 sec to 30 sec Bulb up to 300 sec Flash sync up to 1/30 sec Up to 10 fps Continuous Shooting Up to 18 fps Compatible with EVF-11 EVF Compatible with EVF-11 via future firmware update 3.15" 2.1m-dot touchscreen LCD LCD 3.15" 2.1m-dot touchscreen LCD BP-51 lithium-ion battery Approx. 240 shots/charge Battery BP-51 lithium-ion battery Approx. 280 shots/charge USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C HDMI Type-D 3.5mm Microphone Remote and timecode via microphone port Interface USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C HDMI Type-D 3.5mm Microphone Remote and timecode via microphone port 4.4 x 2.8 x 1.8" Dimensions 4.4 x 2.8 x 1.8" 15.1 oz with battery and SD card Weight 14.9 oz with battery and SD card Who Is the fp L For? When the original fp was released, most of the reviews and debates talked about who the camera was actually designed for. While I got along with it, surprisingly from a photographic perspective, most saw it as a compact cine camera that could handle photo tasks in a pinch. The fp L is clearly setting out to sway this balance back to a 50/50 split of users, welcoming both the photographers who want to shoot video and the cinematographers who want to shoot photos to the user base. I’m much more of a photographer, and I see the fp L as a valuable tool despite its apparent drawbacks. The compact size, quietness, and uniquely customizable design far outweigh the slow flash sync for the type of shooting I mainly do. Landscapes, travel shooting, natural light portraiture and lifestyle imagery, and even product shots and still lifes using constant light are all perfect subjects to tackle with the fp L. It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s the fp L using phase-detection focusing to keep up with fast-moving distant subjects! Taken with the 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Contemporary lens. Another strength of Sigma’s fp-series cameras, too, is their participation in the L-Mount Alliance —a three-way partnership between Sigma, Leica, and Panasonic—that further contributes to it being one of the most adaptable systems out there, which is perfect for shooters who like to dabble between manufacturers. And Then the EVF Directly confronting the many requests for a “real viewfinder” on the original fp, Sigma has responded with the EVF-11 Electronic Viewfinder. In fp system fashion, this finder is an auxiliary EVF and attaches to the side of the camera body, much like the included HU-11 Hot Shoe Unit does. This optional EVF connects via the USB-C port and is secured via the side ¼"-20 mount, and the EVF itself has additional headphone and USB-C ports and another ¼"-20 mount for the strap. The finder has a 90° upward tilting design that suits shooting at low angles, and it has an integrated switch for changing between the EVF and LCD for shooting and reviewing images. While the switch works great for changing, it would have been great to see Sigma incorporate an eye sensor for automatic switching between the body and the finder. Otherwise, this 3.68m-dot OLED is just as good as pretty much any other EVF on the market and felt like it had minimal impact on overall battery life in a regular day of shooting. The EVF-11 is the perfect tool for working in bright and direct light conditions, such as during sunset. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. It’s no surprise that I am a fan of the original fp, and it goes without saying that the fp L makes even more sense to me from a photographer’s standpoint. It’s still an undeniably quirky camera, but the fp L tames the quirkiness quite a bit and stands as a serious offering for a variety of image-making tasks. What are your thoughts on Sigma’s sophomore L-mount mirrorless effort, the fp L? Are you a fan of the modular design and unique feature set of the fp L? Let us know your thoughts in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 03/23/21
Hot on the heels of its latest G Master lens, Sony has just announced three new compact primes in its G Series lineup: the FE 24mm f/2.8 G, FE 40mm f/2.5 G, and FE 50mm f/2.5 G. Adopting many of the advanced design features of their larger siblings, the trio delivers exceptional optical performance in a form factor perfect for everyday carry. Although created for full-frame E-mount cameras (hence the FE designation), their compact build pairs nicely with APS-C models where the 24mm becomes 36mm, 40mm becomes 60mm, and 50mm becomes 75mm. Priority was given to making these lenses small, so that they won’t take up much space in your camera bag, and light, so they won’t weigh you down while shooting. Consequently, each lens measures only 1.8" in length and weighs between 5.7 and 6.1 ounces, depending on the model. All of the lenses incorporate aspherical elements to combat aberration and distortions, as well as extra-low dispersion glass to reduce color fringing and chromatic aberration. A seven-bladed circular aperture helps achieve smooth, round bokeh. Complementing the versatile focal lengths of the new lenses are minimum focusing distances that benefit close-up capture: The 24mm allows you to get as close as 7.1" (manual focus) / 9.4" (autofocus), the 40mm can get 9.8" (MF) / 11" (AF), and the 50mm can focus as close as 12.2" (MF) / 13.8" (AF). Each lens features two linear motors to provide quick and responsive autofocusing for still capture, and quiet performance when recording video. The physical design of the new lenses incorporates some of the most useful features of Sony’s top-tier lenses. The aperture ring can be adjusted in 1/3-stop increments, or de-clicked via a switch on the side of the lens barrel for video applications. An auto/manual focus mode switch is incorporated for moving quickly between focusing modes or fine-tuning focus. Finally, a customizable focus hold button can be used for its namesake or reassigned, based on user preference. All of the lenses boast a sleek aluminum design that is dust and moisture resistant, adding to their appeal as everyday carry options. Settings are engraved into the lens barrel, presenting both an aesthetically pleasing touch as well as adding to the durability of the lens. What do you think of Sony’s latest G Series lenses? Which of Sony’s mirrorless cameras do you think would pair best with them? Share your thoughts in the Comments section, below!
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Posted 03/18/21
New York City-based fashion and beauty photographer Lara Jade shares her fashion photography tips on topics such as finding subjects to photograph and marketing yourself, and talks about the difference between editorial and commercial photography. Are you new to the world of fashion and beauty photography, or a seasoned pro? Share your thoughts about this video, along with your own tips, in the Comments section, below!
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Posted 03/16/21
Sony has officially entered the realm of extremely fast glass with its newest addition to the G Master family: the FE 50mm f/1.2 GM lens. Not only does the new lens add one of the most popular prime focal lengths to Sony’s top-tier lineup, but it also becomes Sony’s fastest E-mount lens to date. The flexibility of the 50mm focal length and brightness of an f/1.2 aperture make this lens an ideal candidate for portraiture and fashion, whether working in the studio or out on location. The impressively compact and lightweight build of this lens—its length and weight match that of its ½-stop slower predecessor—should attract street, event, and even landscape photographers looking for a high-performing prime. Sharp Focus and Soft Bokeh To capture exacting images with razor-thin depth of field, the new G Master takes advantage of Sony’s latest advances in lens technology and consists of 14 elements arranged in 10 groups. Three XA (extreme aspherical) elements join forces to combat aberration, maintain corner-to-corner sharpness, and produce smooth out-of-focus areas. A newly developed 11-blade circular aperture further contributes to clean and natural bokeh, whether in the foreground or background of an image. Combine these attributes with a minimum focusing distance of 1.3' and maximum magnification of 0.17x and the lens becomes a solid option for capturing close-up subjects. Fast AF and Intuitive Design The 50mm f/1.2 utilizes four XD (extreme dynamic) motors for fast, precise, and quiet autofocusing. Responsive manual focusing permits quick and smooth adjustments when shooting stills and expanded creative possibilities when recording video. Like other G Master lenses, a focus mode switch is included on the side of the lens barrel for quick toggling between focus modes. New is the addition of a second focus hold button on the lens barrel, which can be customized to your preference. Familiar to G Master veterans is the inclusion of a de-click switch for the aperture, a useful feature when recording video. Built to Last Like past G Master lenses, the 50mm f/1.2 features hybrid metal-and-plastic construction to balance weight and durability while providing protection against dust and moisture. The front element features a fluorine coating to prevent fingerprints, dirt, water, and other contaminants from sticking to its surface. How Does It Compare? The FE 50mm f/1.2 GM is a major upgrade compared to Sony’s Planar T* FE 50mm f/1.4 ZA lens and a direct competitor to Canon’s RF 50mm f/1.2L USM and Nikon’s NIKKOR Z 50mm f/1.2 S lenses. One of the most impressive aspects of the new prime is how Sony was able to maintain the same size and weight as its f/1.4 model while adding 36% more optical surface to achieve an extra ½ stop of brightness. It matches the length and weight of Canon’s f/1.2, making them both lighter and smaller than Nikon’s version. From a usability standpoint, the Sony features more on-lens tactile controls than the Canon, while the Nikon offers a unique OLED display on the barrel of the lens. Model Maximum Aperture Length Weight Optical Construction Diaphragm Blades Sony FE 50mm f/1.2 GM f/1.2 4.25" 1.7 lb 14 elements, 10 groups 11 Sony Planar T* FE 50mm f/1.4 ZA f/1.4 4.25" 1.7 lb 12 elements, 9 groups 11 Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L USM f/1.2 4.25" 2.1 lb 15 elements, 9 groups 10 Nikon NIKKOR Z 50mm f/1.2 S f/1.2 5.9" 2.4 lb 17 elements, 15 groups 9 Also New from Sony: Camera-Mount Bluetooth Wireless Audio Sony’s announcement of the FE 50mm f/1.2 GM lens follows the release of a pair of audio upgrades aimed at mirrorless video shooters: the ECM-W2BT Camera-Mount Digital Bluetooth Wireless Microphone System and ECM-LV1 Compact Stereo Lavalier Microphone. The ECM-W2BT was designed for vloggers, journalists, and other video content creators seeking an on-camera wireless mic solution. The system consists of a receiver that attaches directly to the MI shoe of compatible Sony cameras and a clip-on transmitter with built-in omnidirectional microphone for quick setup. Each features built-in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that can last up to 9 hours when attached to the MI shoe or 3 hours on their own. Utilizing Bluetooth connectivity, the system can operate up to 650' in good visibility. Microphones are built into the transmitter and receiver, allowing the camera operator and talent to be recorded at the same time. A moisture- and dust-resistant design means you can use the system outdoors with confidence under less-than-ideal conditions. For low-profile audio recording scenarios, the ECM-LV1 lavalier connects with the ECM-W2BT’s transmitter via a 3.3' cable and 3.5mm TRS connector, minimizing the visible footprint of your audio setup. The lav records stereo audio via two omnidirectional capsules. A foam windscreen is included to minimize noise during recording. What do you think of Sony’s latest announcements? Are you itching to shoot with your Sony camera at f/1.2? Ready to incorporate wireless audio into your video setup? Share your thoughts in the Comments section, below!
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Posted 03/05/21
Portrait photographer Claudia Paul shares her tips on how to shoot portraits of non-models, such as making a connection with your clients and making them feel comfortable. Tell us how you plan to apply these tips in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 02/25/21
Portrait Photographer Jerry Ghionis explains how to pose your clients so they always looks good! We hope you enjoy this video, and we invite you to view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at BandH.com. Do you have any tips for posing your portrait clients? Please share them in the Comments section!
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Posted 02/24/21
Sigma has announced a fascinating new f/2.8 standard zoom lens as part of its Contemporary lens line, and true to the Contemporary’s core concept, this 28-70mm f/2.8 DG DN Contemporary lens affords that elusive balance of performance and portability. It is currently the smallest and lightest full-frame f/2.8 standard zoom lens on the market and is available for Sony E-mount and Leica L-mount mirrorless cameras. Based on the optical design of the successful Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG DN Art lens, this 28-70mm lens is decidedly lighter and more compact than its slightly faster stablemate. By still maintaining a common and convenient range of focal lengths, along with the bright f/2.8 constant maximum aperture, this lens should entice many photographers looking for a standard zoom that doesn’t overwhelm their smaller size mirrorless camera body. The advanced optical design of the new lens includes three aspherical, two FLD, and two SLD elements, and despite using fewer total elements than the 24-70mm f/2.8 Art lens, the design corrects axial chromatic aberration and sagittal coma aberration for sharp images, from the center to the edges of the frame. Along with its anti-ghosting design, the use of a Super Multi-Layer Coating controls flare for high-contrast results. The lens features a water- and oil-repellent coating on the front element, has a dust- and splash-proof structure only at the mount, and features fewer and smaller switches on the barrel than the Art lens. Each of these design refinements result in the smallest and lightest lens in its class. The new lens also houses just one lightweight focusing element, which keeps the AF unit small, and with a quiet stepping motor, the internal focus system provides near-silent autofocus performance that is useful for both stills and video capture. Sigma continues to evolve its compact lens options while maintaining the optical performance of its most notable lenses. In my experience using Sigma’s Contemporary and Art series lenses, they both are able to withstand the dings of day-to-day use. If anything, the smaller size protects the Contemporary lenses from the heavier bumps and “strap swing” caused by bigger lenses. Not to mention they are often better balanced on the camera, more comfortable on the neck, and have simple control settings. This Contemporary series 28-70mm f/2.8 L-mount lens weighs just 1 lb, compared to the 1.8 lb of the 24-70mm Art lens, and its barrel diameter is 72mm (67mm filter) compared to 88mm (82mm filter). Some photographers may choose to note the slightly wider angle of view and robustness of the Art series lens, but I see this new Contemporary lens as truly leveraging the technological and design attributes of mirrorless cameras to provide a simple, efficient, and—foremost—compact, wide aperture, zoom lens. Let us know your thoughts on the Sigma Contemporary series lenses and your prospective uses for this new 28-70mm f/2.8 lens in the Comments section, below. Previous Pause Next
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Posted 02/24/21
Profoto has unveiled the Pro-11 2400 AirTTL Power Pack, adding AirX connectivity as well as a variety of internal and external design upgrades to its flagship power pack. A familiar sight on fashion, action, and high-speed photo sets, Profoto’s power packs have earned their namesake, providing dependable, top-tier performance on some of the most demanding jobs in the photo industry. Capable of firing as fast as 1/80,000 second, the Pro-11 is equipped to capture even the most elusive subjects with ease. The addition of AirX functionality not only opens the door to wireless communication with AirX-enabled devices, but also simplifies firmware updates, making it easier than ever to ensure your gear is working at the highest possible level. What's New? AirX Compatibility Adding AirX Bluetooth functionality places the Pro-11 in the company of Profoto’s most technologically advanced lighting tools and “future-proofs” its operation. The AirX App can be used to adjust settings using mobile devices from a distance of up to 100 feet Firmware updates can now be performed without needing to go through the hassle of a USB interface Joins A10 and B10 strobes to form the basis of an AirX ecosystem AirX supports all legacy Air and AirTTL equipped devices Redesigned Exterior The Pro-11 maintains a familiar design while implementing a number of tweaks to streamline workflow on set. Bolder, brighter, easier-to-read typeface on the LCD for monitoring settings Improved buttons in line with Profoto’s latest light models Minor changes to user interface for adjusting settings New sound cues Upgraded Interior A number of tweaks under the hood have been added to the Pro-11 to improve safety and performance, including: Protective earth is now separated between flash circuits and logic to reduce the risk of exploding flash tubes Creepage distances between high-voltage circuits and protective earth are increased to reduce risk of short circuit from internal condensation Dump circuit redesign New panel, flash, and power circuit boards Taking the Best from the Pro-10 The Pro-11 shares many of the features that have made its predecessor a rental-house favorite, including its 2-outlet, 2400Ws design, 0.02-0.7s recycle times, and 11-stop power range in 1/10-stop increments. Capable of quick bursts up to 50 flashes per second, the Pro-11 can handle even the fastest subjects with ease. In addition to its built-in wireless capabilities, the Pro-11 also features a ¼" sync socket and USB port. For continuous applications, it can provide a maximum power of 2 x 500W. A fan is incorporated into its build for cooling. Profoto Ecosystem The Profoto name has become synonymous with the highest-quality lighting tools available to professional photographers. The Pro-11 is compatible with multiple heads and more than 120 light-shaping tools capable of producing nearly any lighting setup you can imagine. By leveraging the power of AirX, AirTTL, and Air technologies, the Pro-11 can be seamlessly integrated into existing Profoto lighting kits, adding a boost of power and the latest technology to personal and rental kits alike. Have you used Profoto’s power packs on set? Share your experiences and thoughts on the company's latest flagship in the Comments section, below!
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