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Posted 05/02/21
Jake Estes and the B&H team explore the creative possibilities of lighting with the Lupo Kickasspanel. This RGBW LED Panel from Lupo has definitely earned its name, with features that allow you to customize the lighting to fit your needs. Would you use this on your next film or video production? Let us know in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 03/25/21
Never afraid to be unique, Sigma has just released the fp L mirrorless camera. The second member of the fp Series of compact, modular, hybrid cameras, the fp L storms in with an all-new, higher-resolution sensor, improved focusing performance, and even brings an accessory electronic viewfinder to the system. When the original fp was released in 2019, it stood out due to its minimal design and distinct feature set that clearly catered more to video applications over stills. The fp L is a revised take on this approach, with more attention given to photography needs, overall speed, and even handling, without giving up its characteristically small stature and customizable ergonomics. Using the 61MP sensor to show off detail and texture. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. The Top Features What are the new features the fp L brings to the plate? Here’s everything you need to know in quick form. Full-frame 61MP BSI CMOS sensor: Up from the 24MP sensor of the original model, the higher-res sensor boosts detail while still keeping an impressive dynamic range and sensitivity range. Its back-illuminated design also yields an especially clean image with low noise. Phase-detection and contrast-detection AF: Compared to the contrast-detection-only design of the original, the hybrid focusing system of the fp L proves to be faster, better for tracking moving subjects, and more precise in tricky lighting conditions. There’s now an EVF for the system: The EVF-11 Electronic Viewfinder is an accessory component for both the fp L and the fp and is a 3.68m-dot OLED panel with a 90° upward tilting design for low-angle shooting. It’s available in a bundle with the fp L or separately for use with existing bodies. Same exact body design as the original fp: Not necessarily a new feature but, rather, a reaffirmation of the successful design of the compact and portable form factor of the first fp. This also means that all previous accessory grips, cages, the hot shoe unit, and loupe are all compatible with the new model. Continuous power via USB-C: The original fp allowed charging the battery inside the camera while it was turned off. The fp L lets you continuously power the camera via USB-C, which is perfect for time-lapse work, recording longer clips, or for working with the camera in a stationary position, like if using it as a webcam. Improved focusing speeds help catch a quick-moving train. Taken with the 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Contemporary lens. A Look Back Before digging more into the new features of the fp L, it’s important to take a look at Sigma’s history of camera design, and why the fp feels like a significant step for the company as a camera manufacturer. Prior to the original fp, Sigma was best known for its use of Foveon sensors, which are still to this day among the most unique sensors available due to their immense color depth and sharpness, albeit with the tradeoffs of reduced sensitivity, dynamic range, and higher noise levels. The fp from 2019 was Sigma’s first camera to adopt the more conventional Bayer array sensor, which offers improved flexibility in terms of dynamic range and sensitivity; as well as benefits video recording capabilities. More than the unique-for-Sigma Bayer sensor, the original fp stood out in the field of mirrorless camera designs for a number of other reasons: It’s still one of the most compact full-frame models available; it doesn’t contain a physical shutter, rather relying on an electronic shutter function; and it’s designed to be modular so each user can build the camera up however they see fit—two different hand grip options are available from Sigma, along with a loupe viewfinder, an accessory hot shoe, compatible third-party cages and grips, and so on. Late afternoon scene mixing harsh, deep shadows with bright, sunlit surfaces. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. Looking Forward The fp L doesn’t stray from these unique features but does offer a wealth of refinements to push this bold release further, especially with how photographers approach the concept of a modular and multimedia camera. The original fp didn’t quite click with many photographers due to its relatively slow focusing performance, the lack of an electronic viewfinder, and because of the lack of a built-in hot shoe and subsequently cumbersome method for working with flash. Responding to this, Sigma made sure to address most of these points—faster phase-detection focusing and a new accessory EVF—although it still has the electronic shutter only design, and associated 1/15-second flash sync speed, and likely won’t be anyone’s first camera choice for flash photography applications. Conversely, though, the plus side to omitting a physical shutter from a camera’s design is the smaller, lighter-weight design, quiet operation, and theoretically improved durability since there are fewer moving parts. Assuming you’re a photographer who can forgo the need for faster flash sync, then the fp L rewards with the sensor design that includes phase-detection AF for accurate moving subject tracking. In use, this felt like one of the more apparent upgrades over the fp, along with the higher resolution. Focusing is snappier and more accurate, regardless of the type of subject with which you’re working. The 61MP sensor is great for picking out and emphasizing details in ordinary scenes. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. And then there is the 61MP resolution, which puts the fp L squarely in the realm of an objectively high-resolution camera. In practice, this spec is sometimes a bit too much resolution, but I don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing. With the spare resolution, so to speak, Sigma also incorporated a new Crop Zoom feature for “zooming into” the scene by simply cropping in from the full-frame image area. It’s a nice tool to have in-camera, since you can preview the look of a tighter crop while shooting, especially if you’re just working with a single lens that’s a bit too wide for the shot you want. In addition to the major updates, the fp L also received some more minor, but welcomed, additions: There is now a true 24.00 fps frame rate for video recording, Duotone and Powder Blue color modes have been added, custom camera settings can be saved and shared to other cameras via a QR code, you can take screenshots of the camera’s rear LCD, and the Director’s Viewfinder has been updated with new cine cam models and custom frame line options. More emphasis on details with this shot of peeling paint just before sunset. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. fp L vs fp Comparing the fp L to the original fp, you’ll see the few changes between the models and how they look on paper. The interesting thing about comparing the two cameras, though, is that most of the differences are just an “on paper” matter, since they share the same body design and user interface. On the other hand, this comparison goes to show how just a few changes to a camera’s spec list can truly shake up how one interprets a camera. fp L fp 61MP BSI CMOS 36 x 24mm; Bayer Array Sensor 24.6MP BSI CMOS 35.9 x 23.9mm; Bayer Array UHD 4K up to 30p FHD 1080 up to 120p CinemaDNG 8-bit recording Video (Internal) UHD 4K up to 30p FHD 1080 up to 120p CinemaDNG 8-bit recording DCI 4K at 24p Raw 12-bit recording Video (External) DCI 4K at 24p Raw 12-bit recording Phase-detection and contrast-detection Autofocus Contrast-detection only ISO 100-25600 Expandable ISO 6-102400 Base ISO—Stills: ISO 100/400 Base ISO—CinemaDNG 12-bit and raw output: ISO 100/1250 Base ISO—MOV/CinemaDNG 10-bit, 8-bit: ISO 100/250 ISO Sensitivity ISO 100-25600 Expandable ISO 6-102400 Base ISO—Stills: ISO 100/640 Base ISO—CinemaDNG 12-bit and raw output: ISO 100/3200 Base ISO—MOV/CinemaDNG 10-bit, 8-bit: ISO 100/640 Electronic shutter 1/8000 sec to 30 sec Bulb up to 300 sec Flash sync up to 1/15 sec Shutter Speed Electronic shutter 1/8000 sec to 30 sec Bulb up to 300 sec Flash sync up to 1/30 sec Up to 10 fps Continuous Shooting Up to 18 fps Compatible with EVF-11 EVF Compatible with EVF-11 via future firmware update 3.15" 2.1m-dot touchscreen LCD LCD 3.15" 2.1m-dot touchscreen LCD BP-51 lithium-ion battery Approx. 240 shots/charge Battery BP-51 lithium-ion battery Approx. 280 shots/charge USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C HDMI Type-D 3.5mm Microphone Remote and timecode via microphone port Interface USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C HDMI Type-D 3.5mm Microphone Remote and timecode via microphone port 4.4 x 2.8 x 1.8" Dimensions 4.4 x 2.8 x 1.8" 15.1 oz with battery and SD card Weight 14.9 oz with battery and SD card Who Is the fp L For? When the original fp was released, most of the reviews and debates talked about who the camera was actually designed for. While I got along with it, surprisingly from a photographic perspective, most saw it as a compact cine camera that could handle photo tasks in a pinch. The fp L is clearly setting out to sway this balance back to a 50/50 split of users, welcoming both the photographers who want to shoot video and the cinematographers who want to shoot photos to the user base. I’m much more of a photographer, and I see the fp L as a valuable tool despite its apparent drawbacks. The compact size, quietness, and uniquely customizable design far outweigh the slow flash sync for the type of shooting I mainly do. Landscapes, travel shooting, natural light portraiture and lifestyle imagery, and even product shots and still lifes using constant light are all perfect subjects to tackle with the fp L. It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s the fp L using phase-detection focusing to keep up with fast-moving distant subjects! Taken with the 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Contemporary lens. Another strength of Sigma’s fp-series cameras, too, is their participation in the L-Mount Alliance —a three-way partnership between Sigma, Leica, and Panasonic—that further contributes to it being one of the most adaptable systems out there, which is perfect for shooters who like to dabble between manufacturers. And Then the EVF Directly confronting the many requests for a “real viewfinder” on the original fp, Sigma has responded with the EVF-11 Electronic Viewfinder. In fp system fashion, this finder is an auxiliary EVF and attaches to the side of the camera body, much like the included HU-11 Hot Shoe Unit does. This optional EVF connects via the USB-C port and is secured via the side ¼"-20 mount, and the EVF itself has additional headphone and USB-C ports and another ¼"-20 mount for the strap. The finder has a 90° upward tilting design that suits shooting at low angles, and it has an integrated switch for changing between the EVF and LCD for shooting and reviewing images. While the switch works great for changing, it would have been great to see Sigma incorporate an eye sensor for automatic switching between the body and the finder. Otherwise, this 3.68m-dot OLED is just as good as pretty much any other EVF on the market and felt like it had minimal impact on overall battery life in a regular day of shooting. The EVF-11 is the perfect tool for working in bright and direct light conditions, such as during sunset. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. It’s no surprise that I am a fan of the original fp, and it goes without saying that the fp L makes even more sense to me from a photographer’s standpoint. It’s still an undeniably quirky camera, but the fp L tames the quirkiness quite a bit and stands as a serious offering for a variety of image-making tasks. What are your thoughts on Sigma’s sophomore L-mount mirrorless effort, the fp L? Are you a fan of the modular design and unique feature set of the fp L? Let us know your thoughts in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 02/04/21
In this B&H Online Video, Doug Guerra tests Sony’s newest full-frame mirrorless camera, the Alpha 1. Sony’s flagship camera is designed to do it all, boasting impressive features such as: 50MP Full-Frame Sensor Up to 30 fps Shooting ISO 50-102400 8K 30p and 4K 120p Video in 10-Bit Real-time Eye AF for humans and animals 759 phase-detection points and 425 contrast-detection areas 120 AF and AE calculations per second and much more! Learn more about the Sony Alpha 1 at the links below, and when you have had any experience with this camera, tell us all in the Comments section! B&H Explora blog post Watch our First Look video Live Panel Discussion
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Posted 01/13/21
Among the madness that is CES, Sony slipped in a surprise photo announcement: the FE 35mm f/1.4 GM lens. Sony has been very clear that this full-frame E-mount lens is aiming to deliver top-tier image quality in a compact package, and it looks like the company absolutely hit the mark. The 35mm GM appears to be one of the best and most versatile prime lenses to join Sony's ever-growing mirrorless system. The Basics As stated earlier, the FE 35mm f/1.4 GM is designed for use with full-frame E-mount cameras. This includes options like the a7/a9 series, as well as the Cinema Line cameras, including the FX6 and FX9. It will also work well with APS-C and Super 35mm models where it will offer a 52.5mm equivalent focal length. If you shoot practically any contemporary Sony camera, you should be happy with this lens. Photographs © Stephanie Gross The FE 35mm f/1.4 GM is a perfect match for a7-series cameras and creates a compact and versatile system. With this G Master lens, Sony has once again put the emphasis on resolution and bokeh. Using two eXtreme Aspherical (XA) elements, it retains sharpness out to the edges. Assisting is an extra-low dispersion (ED) element that practically eliminates chromatic aberrations—a common problem with fast-aperture lenses. These specialized elements also contribute to smooth bokeh, and an 11-blade diaphragm ensures circular bokeh shapes. And there is a Nano AR Coating II to minimize ghosting and flares. The lens can focus down to 10.6" with AF or 9.8" in manual, and it makes use of two eXtreme Dynamic (XD) linear motors for fast, quiet focus, and is internally focusing. There is a large, rubberized focus ring that benefits from linear response manual focus for better control, too. If you are familiar with the FE 24mm f/1.4 GM, you will find the 35mm GM is quite similar in terms of design. The 35mm is only slightly larger, which makes it incredibly compact for its particular combination of focal length and aperture. It measures 3.0 x 3.8" and weighs less than 1.2 lb. It's impressive. Other matching features include a physical aperture ring, de-click switch, focus hold button, AF/MF switch, fluorine coating, and dust- and moisture-resistant construction. Hands-On Thoughts This lens is beautiful and feels great in the hand. Sony has done wonders lately with the 24mm and, now, the 35mm GM as the company shows that you can still make lenses that are extremely compact and don't compromise on image quality. The 35mm GM is another winner. The lens is very similar to the 24mm GM, which is good. Images are sharp and distortion is very well controlled. Resolving power does not seem to be an issue as it appears to maintain detail even with the demanding 61MP sensor in the a7R IV. You can make out individual hairs and threads on clothing, with no issue. Sony a7R IV; f/5; 1/100 sec; ISO 125 Bokeh is smooth with the fast f/1.4 aperture, and the close minimum focusing distance allows users to create images with extremely shallow depth of field. This makes it useful for a variety of applications, including portraits. Also, the fast aperture is good for low-light situations. It might be a little too shallow in some cases, so be careful not to just have it at f/1.4 all the time. It also does get a little bit sharper if you stop down to f/2 or f/4, though it isn't a dramatic jump. Wide open is still very sharp. Sony a7R IV; f/1.4; 1/80 sec; ISO 80 Vignetting at wider apertures is very minimal and is very easily cleaned up in Photoshop or any other raw developer. And, as I wrote earlier, distortion is not a problem in the slightest. This shouldn't be too surprising since 35mm isn't that far off from normal 50mm and shouldn't display much distortion in the first place. Sony a7R IV; f/1.4; 1/100 sec; ISO 500 Autofocus is fast, as is expected, and it tracks well with Sony's features, including Eye AF. There really haven't been issues with AF and Sony lenses in a good long while. Video shooters will also appreciate this because the focus motors are silent and work very well with the a7S III's speedy system, and I would expect similar performance on the FX6 and FX9. The linear response manual focus is also very good, though I'm not sure it's quite to the level of mechanically linked focus; it's as good as focus-by-wire can get. And the de-clickable aperture ring is always nice. Previous Pause Next There isn't anything I can pick out as a flaw with this lens. It's smaller than many competing options, is able to deliver on promised image quality, and, while not cheap, isn't truly that expensive—considering its feature set. Sony knocked it out of the park with this one. Compared to Sony's Other 35mm Lenses Now, you might be wondering how this is different from the older Sony Distagon T* FE 35mm f/1.4 ZA Lens since they share core specs and premium branding. It's a good question. Primarily, since the 35mm GM is newer, it is able to make use of Sony's latest optical technologies, such as XA elements and the Nano AR Coating II. It also has an improved focus system that includes a linear response manual focus and smoother performance that is great for video. Plus, it is 0.6" shorter and lighter by about 3.7 oz—a notable savings on both fronts. You might simply call the 35mm GM "better," but I would say they are just different, and they hit different price points to appeal to different users. Sony Distagon T* FE 35mm f/1.4 ZA Lens | Sony FE 35mm f/1.8 Lens | Sony FE 35mm f/1.8 Lens Beyond the 35mm f/1.4 ZA, Sony has two other full-frame 35mm lenses to choose from—the FE 35mm f/1.8 and Sonnar T* FE 35mm f/2.8 ZA. The 35mm GM still sits far above these in terms of optics performance and speed. Even though this new f/1.4 is relatively compact, when compared to the f/1.8 and f/2.8 it looks large. The 35mm f/2.8 is incredibly small and is one of my favorite lenses because of that. However, most folks will likely be drawn to the 35mm f/1.8 because it offers a bit more speed with only a bit more bulk. The f/1.8 still doesn't have everything since it lacks a physical aperture ring and the more advanced AF of the new GM. Still, it is likely the best choice for most photographers. If you want the best, the choice is clear: Get the FE 35mm f/1.4 GM. Breakdown: FE 35mm f/1.4 GM: Incredible resolution, compact design, fast f/1.4 aperture, and the latest tech. The top-of-the-line 35mm. FE 35mm f/1.4 ZA: Excellent resolution, the "ZEISS Look," and a fast f/1.4 aperture. FE 35mm f/1.8: Best all-arounder with lightweight design, advanced optics, good f/1.8 aperture, and middle-of-the-pack feature set. FE 35mm f/2.8 ZA: Incredibly compact, near-pancake design, excellent optical quality. Specialty optic if you want the smallest lens without compromising image quality. What are your thoughts on the Sony FE 35mm f/1.4 GM Lens? Share them in the Comments section, below. This might just be my next purchase and, considering that the 35mm is my favorite focal length, could quickly become my most-used lens. See more of Stephanie Gross's photographs on Instagram @yungstephie.
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Posted 11/12/20
Doug Guerra tries the Tamron 70-300mm f/4.5-6.3 Di III RXD Lens using the Sony a7R IV. This Tamron lens offers a good balance of size, reach, and image quality for your full-frame, mirrorless Sony camera.  Previous Pause Next Click here to learn more about the Tamron 70-300mm f/4.5-6.3 Di III RXD Lens at B&H Explora.
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Posted 11/06/20
Black-and-white photography and the name Leica have a synergy unlike any other medium and camera company, which is why it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Leica has introduced its fourth camera in eight years to wear the Monochrom nameplate. What is interesting is that with the introduction of the new Leica Q2 Monochrom, Leica has expanded the Monochrom brand beyond its fabled M-series bodies to now include Leica’s popular Q-series cameras. Photographs © Allan Weitz 2020 The Leica Q2 Monochrom is a black-and-white-only camera based on Leica’s extremely popular Q2 color camera, and features nearly identical specs, including a 47.3MP full-frame sensor, Maestro II processor, high-res EVF, and so on. The Q2 Monochrom also features the same fixed Leica Summilux 28mm f/1.7 ASPH. lens, which was specifically designed for the Q-system. Unlike Leica M-mount lenses, which are designed for rangefinder cameras and do not focus close, a flip of a switch on the Q2 lens barrel enables close focusing down to 6.7" from the sensor plane. If you love black-and-white photography, you’ll love the images created by Leica’s new Q2 Monochrom. And this lens is sharp—real sharp, and with a pleasing degree of bokeh when set at wide apertures. Rather than a tulip-style lens shade, the Q2 Monochrom comes with a forward-tapered metal screw-on shade that does a very effective job of blocking stray light, while maintaining the sleek form factor of the camera. The Q2 Monochrom’s Summilux 28mm f/1.7 ASPH. focuses down to 6.7" from the sensor plane. For the times that 28mm is too wide for your tastes, you can go into the menus and digitally set the camera to record the fields-of-view of a 35mm (30MP), 50mm (14.6MP), or 75mm (6.6MP) lens. The files become progressively smaller as you “zoom in,” but with the possible exception of 75mm (6.6MP), the files have plenty of meat on the bones, considering the 47.3MP resolution of the full-frame sensor. Truth is, for online sharing, all of these file sizes are perfectly fine. If 28mm is too wide (top left), you can set the Q2 Monochrom to capture the scene at 35mm (top right), 50mm (lower left), or 75mm equivalent focal lengths (lower right). Even at high ISOs, at night, the Q2 Monochrom captures amazingly detailed image files. Design-wise, the Q2 Monochrom, which is manufactured in Germany, is minimalist and seductively gorgeous. Unlike the Q2, which has a black chrome finish, with white and red paint engravings on the lens barrel and that famous Leica red dot on the side of the lens, the Q2 Monochrom sports a flat black paint and textured black leatherette akin to the M-series Monochrom cameras. The new Leica Q2 Monochrom has the same stealthy matte-black finish and detailing as the Leica M10 Monochrom. Both are examples of exquisite industrial design and as seductive looking as it gets. The Q2 Monochrom also features gray and white painted engravings on the lens barrel instead of red and white paint, and there’s no red dot. The camera is as stealthy as it gets. You even have to look hard to find the nameplate. (It’s engraved in matte black on the accessory shoe.) If you seek attention when wandering about taking pictures, this is not the camera for you. You have to look hard to find the nameplate on this camera, and that’s part of its charm. Like the Q2, the body of the Q2 Monochrom is weather sealed (IP-52), as is the lens. The Q2 Monochrom is also the first Leica Monochrom camera that shoots 4K video—M Monochrom cameras shoot stills only. If 28mm is too wide, you can shoot at 35mm, 50mm, or 75mm crops (above image is at 75mm). For composing and reviewing stills and video, the Q2 Monochrom features a 3.68m-dot electronic viewfinder and a 1.04m-dot, 3.0" fixed touchscreen LCD. Both viewing options are fine, though I personally wish the LCD were a tilt screen for low-angle and above-the-head shooting. This street scene includes the side of a building brightly lit by unfiltered sunlight and street activity in deep shadow. It’s a piece of cake to open the shadows while maintaining fine detail from the Q2 Monochrom’s hefty DNG image files. Internally and function-wise, the Q2 Monochrom is one and the same as the full-color version of the Q2 Monochrom. Being monochrome-only, there are fewer menus to scroll through, but, otherwise, if you’ve shot with a Leica Q or Q2, you’ll have a zero learning curve. And if you’ve never shot with a digital Leica, you’ll find the Leica menus to be among the most user-friendly in the industry. The heart of the Q2 Monochrom is a full-frame 47.3MP CMOS sensor that, while similar to the sensor found in the standard Leica Q2, features a new micro-lens design and does not have a color array or low-pass filter. The new Q2 Monochrom is ideal for street shooting and travel. Unlike conventional color sensors in which individual pixels record specific color channels, which reduces the overall resolving power of the sensor, every pixel in Monochrom sensors is dedicated to recording only grayscale, which greatly increases the resolution and detail of the final image. This also increases the dynamic range of the sensor compared to the dynamic range of the standard Q2 (13 stops vs 11 stops on standard Q2 at ISO 200). Eliminating the color array also expands the sensitivity of the sensor from ISO 100 to 100,000, which is a stop higher than the Q2. The range of tonality combined with incredible detail separates Leica’s line of Monochrom cameras from the black-and-white conversions you get from conventional RGB sensors. Aside from the new monochrome sensor, the Q2 Monochrom shares all of the features and specs of the Q2, including a choice of JPEG, DNG (raw), or a combination of the two; burst rates up to 10 fps; DCI and UHD 4K video, as well as high-speed Full HD at 120 fps recording; optical image stabilization; and a leaf shutter with flash sync at speeds up to 1/500 second for all you fill-flash enthusiasts. And to facilitate sharing your pictures on social media, the Q2 Monochrom is Bluetooth and Wi-Fi enabled. Being a black-and-white-only camera, you won’t find any color settings in the camera’s menus, but you will find Sepia, Blue, and Selenium toning filters for adding a bit of mood and atmosphere to your stills and videos. The tones captured by the Q2 Monochrom are absolutely lifelike. The Q2 Monochrom is compatible with all of its sister ship accessories, along with a few new toys of its own. New for the Q2 Monochrom is a Q2 Monochrom Handgrip (highly recommended if I may say so myself!) and three 49mm black-and-white filters: green, orange, and yellow. So how does the new 47MP Q2 Monochrom stack up against the 40MP M10 Monochrom? Interestingly, according to initial tests (as well as my own test comparisons), the dynamic range of the files is quite close, but the files from the Q2 Monochrom have a slight edge when it comes to resolution. It’s not a major difference, but a difference, nonetheless. Previous Pause Next Leica Q2 Monochrom Sample Images The new Leica Q2 Monochrom should be available at B&H as you read this. Are you a fan of black-and-white photography? Have you had an opportunity to try any of Leica’s Monochrom cameras? If so, we’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 09/29/20
Our video team tests the Godox RGB Mini Creative M1 in various cinematic lighting setups. This lightweight and compact LED light boasts 2500 to 8500K variable color temperature, RGB mode with 360 colors, full 0 to 100% dimming, CRI of 97, 15 effects, 40 presets, Music Mode, and more. Would you add this to your lighting setup? Check out our lighting tutorials: Lighting for Mood YouTube Lighting Setup for Beginners: 3 Point Lighting Tutorial
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Posted 07/28/20
The Sony a7S III is finally here! The newest Sony camera features a brand-new back side-illuminated 12.1MP full-frame CMOS sensor that delivers vibrant, yet natural colors, fast autofocus for photo and video, internal 4K 10-bit video up to 120 fps, touch focus in every mode, 5.5 stops of image stabilization, passive heat management, and much more! Doug Guerra takes the Sony a7S III out for a real-world test in various conditions, including low light. He also compares its features to the Sony a7S II and the Sony a7R IV. Learn more about the Sony a7S III Mirrorless Digital Camera at B&H Explora.
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Posted 07/12/20
Doug Guerra tests the Tamron 28-200mm f/2.8-5.6 Di III RXD Lens for Sony E, out in the real world. This versatile lens is perfect for outdoor photography, having a wide focal length of 28mm and a telephoto focal length of 200mm. Learn more about the Tamron 28-200mm f/2.8-5.6 Di III RXD Lens at B&H Explora.
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Posted 05/14/20
In this lens review, Jake tests the  Tamron 70-180mm f/2.8 Di III VXD  in both photo and video scenarios. Compact and fast, this lens was specially designed for full-frame Sony E-mount cameras and rounds out Tamron's offering for this series. And while you're contemplating your next lens acquisition, watch our hands-on review of the  Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 Di III RXD. For more hand-on reviews, news, and creative ideas, turn to  B&H Explora.
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