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Posted 05/01/20
See how refraction works and how to be creative with it in your photography. There are various ways you can use this phenomenon, such as with water drops, a glass ball, or even a glass of water. These photography tricks work for either outdoor or indoor photography, so let your creativity flow! Also check out these At-Home videos for more ways to help you stay creative at home.
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Posted 04/21/20
Just because we can’t travel right now, it doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy outdoor photography! During this DIY home photo shoot, Maria Perez talks about long-exposure photography settings (such as ISO, aperture, and shutter speed) and gear to use, such as an ND filter. Watch along as she experiments with photographing a DIY waterfall, a bonfire, and light painting. Also check out these  At-Home videos  for more ways to help you stay creative at home.
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Posted 04/07/20
Looking for things to do when you’re bored and social distancing? Get your family or roommates involved with some portrait photography! Maria, with her roommate as her model, shares some of her ideas for home portrait photography. Using natural light, she demonstrates a few DIY lighting tips, as well as photography tricks using props from your backyard. Also check out these At-Home videos for more ways to help you stay creative at home.
293 Views
Posted 09/02/19
Sony Kando is a week-long experience for photographers and videographers to learn and network with fellow creatives. B&H's Jake Estes used his time at Kando 3.0 to learn about everything from long exposure and wildlife photography to portraiture and more. He spent the week in Oregon, learning from Sony Artisans such as Katrin Eismann, Colby Brown, and Sara France, and talking with Sony Alpha Collective members and photographers from around the world. Check out the video to see how it went!
1756 Views
Posted 06/20/19
In this B&H interview, wedding/portrait photographer Sam Hurd offers five simple tips to help you add a creative element to location portraits in any environment. When shooting with a prime lens and shallow depth of field, mask distracting elements from a scene by holding the side of a basic cell phone in front of your lens, creating a reflection on demand. A six-inch triangular glass prism can be used in the same way to enhance a portrait with dual reflections, or even flares and distortions if you pivot the prism and shoot at an angle. Pick up an unmounted double convex lens to create imperfect reflections and explosions of bokeh in scenes with small bright light sources, especially at night. An old anamorphic lens takes on new life when held in front of your prime, to distort an image in a fun house mirror effect. Undistort the perspective in post using Lightroom or Photoshop, to achieve a cinematic perspective with shallow depth of field. And, in sunset conditions or a harsh light situation, hold a 1 x 1" copper or metal pipe in front of your lens to enable controllable dramatic flare, which Hurd calls a ring of fire.
4832 Views
Posted 08/28/15
Susan Stripling offers a brief and spot-on set of practical tips for anyone considering or starting their own wedding photography business. Whether you want to shoot the occasional wedding or open your own studio with employees, Stripling’s down-to-earth pointers will put you on the right path.
6917 Views
Posted 07/08/15
In this video presentation, pro wedding photographer Susan Stripling imparts advice for fellow wedding shooters based on her years of experience in the business. She outlines eight pitfalls that if not prepared for, can ruin your whole day, and maybe your client’s wedding photography experience! Inside these tips, Susan shares her thoughts about time management, contingencies, gear issues, and client relationships. We hope you enjoy the video, and invite you to view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at BandH.com.
3051 Views
Posted 06/30/15
New York City-based wedding photographer Ryan Brenizer starts this very informative tutorial with a piece of information familiar to any photographer—most of your time working on a job will be spent in front of a computer. Therefore, it is crucial to develop a system to streamline your workflow while guaranteeing the safety of your images. Using Carbon Copy Cloner to back up images, Brenizer then edits with Photo Mechanic and begins to process images in Lightroom, where he provides detailed and nuanced explanations of the tools available to quickly and effectively get the most from your large group of photos. He then moves to Photoshop for specific detailed fixes that would take longer in Lightroom. Tips regarding the light qualities of specific cameras, measuring white balance on black items, batch processing, and “editing in” go a long way to speed your process and improve your images and overall presentation.
2444 Views
Posted 06/02/15
With very practical tips thrown into the mix, wedding photographer Karen Hill provides us with an exemplary version of a wedding-day timeline. She outlines the important sequences of a wedding-day shoot and the time she normally allots to each. Scouting, planning your moves and avoiding time snares—even if it means being polite but firm—are crucial to ensure that you are available to get the truly important shots. Regardless, Hill reminds us that “every wedding has its flow and it’s my job to tap into that flow.”
6887 Views
Posted 05/11/15
Ryan Brenizer offers five deceptively simple ideas to improve your lighting when shooting weddings and, with one glance at his dramatic and subtle lighting effects, it becomes clear that these ideas, when executed properly, will create gorgeous images. Brenizer likes to travel light and his tips often involve using speedlights, whether on camera or off. Creating effective backlight is a specialty of his and “playing billiards with light” refers to the way he bounces light from walls and ceilings for flattering illumination. He also discusses the benefits of continuous light—from any source—and the way you can make (or break) a photo by positioning a light close to your subject.
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