Refine
Done
0 Views
Posted 01/12/22
Camera lenses, strobes, and light modifiers are all a part of taking dynamic sports portraits. In this B&H Online Video, photographer Matt Hernandez shares 5 tips for creating great sports portraiture. Are you a sports photographer? How will you apply Hernandez’s portrait tips? Leave a comment below.
0 Views
Posted 01/13/22
Innovating without losing sight of its timeless heritage, Leica has just announced the newest M rangefinder camera: the M11. On the outside, the M11 looks familiar; its classic rangefinder form seems nearly identical to the original M3 from 1954. On the inside, though, the M11 is all about evolution, with a newly designed 60MP sensor, refreshed interface, and improved photo capabilities that remain true to the minimalist appeal of M cameras. Leica M11 So, how does one improve enough on a timeless camera to warrant a new generation? In Leica’s case, the key improvements revolve around the sensor. Now at 60MP, the full-frame CMOS sensor is also back-illuminated—a first for a Leica M—which reduces the appearance of noise. Along with the BSI configuration, the high-resolution sensor also has a lower native sensitivity than the M10 generation, at ISO 64, and can reach up to ISO 50000 for working in low-light conditions. The real excitement of this sensor, though, is with the new Triple Resolution Technology—essentially a pixel-binning process―that allows you to record 60MP, 36MP, or 18MP stills using the full sensor area and all resolutions with 14-bit color. This is a unique solution for the often-heard argument “I just don’t need 60MP” or the “I wish this camera had more than 18MP” plea. In either case, Triple Resolution Technology lets you pick the resolution you need without the drawbacks of cropping or shooting at reduced quality. In fact, each resolution has unique benefits: The 60MP setting obviously has the highest resolution, perfect for fine-detail shooting, and features a 14-stop dynamic range; the 36MP setting is a Goldilocks choice, offering an improved 15 stops of dynamic range and well-controlled noise; and the 18MP setting excels in low-light, with the best noise performance and 15 stops of dynamic range. Besides the new sensor, Leica, of course, also added the newest Maestro III processor to the camera, which helps with the Triple Resolution Technology, as well as makes general shooting and navigation faster. The M11 isn’t a sports or action camera in a conventional sense, but faster processing does allow for up to 4.5 fps continuous shooting, and file saving is quicker. Going back to the sensor one more time, the M11 is the first M camera to also have an electronic shutter function and supports shutter speeds up to 1/16,000 second for working with faster lenses, like the Noctilux series, in bright conditions without the need for ND filters. Among some other improvements of the M11, it’s Leica’s first rangefinder to feature multifield metering as an option alongside center- and spot-metering options. It’s also the first time in-camera digital cropping is available, which takes advantage of the 60MP resolution and crops into the image at 1.3x (39MP) and 1.8x (18MP) times to simulate working with longer focal length lenses. A surprisingly welcome feature is live view stabilization; this isn’t image stabilization for the camera itself, but this function stabilizes the image when using live view on the rear 2.95" 2.3MP touchscreen LCD, or optional Visoflex 2, for easier shooting with longer focal length lenses that are tricky to focus with the viewfinder. Optical Viewfinder Regarding the camera’s physical aspects, it’s true the M11 does have the familiar and traditional body Leica fans know and love, but it’s also one of the more dramatically different body updates over the past few generations. Before getting into the differences, the holdovers include the bright 0.73x-magnification optical viewfinder, rangefinder-aided manual focusing, the frame line switching lever, and the same top profile with shutter speed and ISO dials for easy control. The camera’s lines already look classic, and it retains the same svelte thickness of the M10, which was designed to match the thickness of film-era cameras. However, the M11 is the first M camera not to feature a removable base plate. Instead, the M11 is inheriting design elements from the SL and Q cameras and now has a removable battery that slots right into the base of the camera with a two-stage lock to keep it secure. This innovation, and the corresponding BP-SCL7 battery, offer 64% more battery capacity compared to the M10’s battery, meaning you can record more than 700 frames per charge. Another small tweak to the body is the addition of an Fn button on the top plate near the shutter release button, which can be set to access nearly any menu setting in the camera, like toggling focus peaking (or the screen itself) on or off. Also, the M11 has an updated menu interface that’s in line with the Q and SL cameras for even simpler operation and consistency across the brand.   A single UHS-II SD memory card slot is tucked into the battery compartment, too, and a surprising addition to the M platform―the M11 also has 64GB of internal memory. This storage space is great for saving files sans memory card or in addition to the single card for splitting file types or saving overflow. Since the M11 is still a photo-only camera, 64GB can go a long way for storage. It frees you from memory cards if you wish, and can serve as a unique workaround for not having dual memory card slots. Another key update to the body is the inclusion of a USB Type-C port on the base, next to the battery. The M11 is setting a new precedent for the series in terms of sharing files and, along with the internal storage, this port is a fast way of getting files from the camera to your computer or mobile device. The M11 ships with the Leica FOTOS Cable, which is an Apple-approved USB Type-C to Lightning cable that lets you transfer from the camera to an iPhone using the Leica FOTOS app for file management. Wireless sharing is permitted, too, using Bluetooth and Wi-Fi along with the FOTOS app. Leica FOTOS Cable One final distinction to point out is the two finish choices of the M11: Black and Silver-Chrome. Besides the obvious tonal differences, Leica has also decided to make the black version with an aluminum top plate and scratch-resistant coating, which offers 20% weight savings compared to the silver-chrome version, which is made from brass for a more traditional appearance. The black camera weighs 1.2 lb (530g) with the battery installed and the silver camera weighs 1.4 lb (640g) with the battery installed. M11 in Black and Silver-Chrome While the M11 is certainly the star of today’s announcement, Leica is also introducing a refresh of one of the most valuable M accessories: the Visoflex 2. Improving upon the first generation EVF, this new finder has a much higher 3.7MP resolution for clearer viewing. Its aluminum exterior is a perfect match for the M11, it tilts upward 90° for low-angle shooting, and it has an adjustable-4 to +3 diopter. Also, it will be compatible with M10-generation cameras with a future firmware update. The Visoflex 2 is a key accessory for the M system when working at the extremes of the system, such as when using ultra-wide, telephoto, and macro lenses. Rounding out the M11 launch, Leica naturally is also releasing a variety of functional and stylish accessories for the camera, including the M11 Handgrip, which has a built-in Arca-style mount; an M11 Thumb Support for a more secure grip; M11 Protector Cases, in Black, Cognac, and Olive Green; matching Straps in Black, Cognac, and Olive Green; and a new LCD Screen Protector for the updated screen size. M11 Protector Case in Cognac The M11 straddles the historic and forward-thinking lines with class. The camera has the timeless design by which an M camera is recognized, and Leica isn’t giving up the handling traits and manual operation for which their flagships are known. On the other hand, the M11 does contain meaningful technological improvements, such as the unique sensor with Triple Resolution Technology, an electronic shutter function, built-in storage, and more intuitive connectivity. It’s a camera that’s simultaneously familiar and pleasantly surprising. What are your thoughts on the new Leica M11? Do you think rangefinders still have a place in the digital camera world? What is your favorite feature of the new camera? Let us know, in the Comments section, below.
0 Views
Posted 01/03/22
Wildlife photographer and Nikon Ambassador Kristi Odom provides some insight on how she approaches bird photography, hopefully helping you elevate your own bird photos beyond the typical portrait. Are birds your main subject? How do you approach bird photography? Let us know in the Comments section!
0 Views
Posted 12/17/21
Learn how to take better self-portraits, with Brandi Nicole, who offers advice on a whole range of topics, from camera gear to photoshoot ideas. Are you a self-portraitist? What are some of your tips for quality images? Share them with us below, in the Comments section.
0 Views
Posted 12/16/21
Jake Estes tests the Tamron 18-300mm f/3.5-6.3 for FUJIFILM X, a versatile ultra-wide to telephoto lens. This zoom lens was created for the X-mount/APS-C format and is a perfect all-arounder, because it covers almost any shooting situation. Will you be adding this lens to your kit? Share your thoughts on it in the Comments, below.
0 Views
Posted 12/10/21
Yana Zabavnik shares her five food photography tips on finding your style. What kind of lighting do you like? What kind of props do you want to use? Do you prefer a food flat lay or a macro photo? The answers to these questions will help you find your style when photographing food. Which of these tips will you apply to your own food photography? Do you have any of your own to share? Let us know below, in the Comments section.
0 Views
Posted 12/09/21
Fast and compact, these new Tamron lenses are a welcome addition to any photographer's kit! You don't have to sacrifice image quality for these lightweight lenses. The 28-75mm offers a bright f/2.8 maximum aperture, improved sharpness, faster and more precise performance, and more. The 35-150mm is a medium telephoto lens with a maximum aperture of f/2-2.8, quick and quiet autofocus, and more. Which of these lenses will you be adding to your kit? Maybe both? Let us know, and why, in the Comments section, below! Click to read about these two zoom lenses.
0 Views
Posted 12/03/21
Have you ever wondered how to get started in deep-sky astrophotography? Brian Fulda shares his astrophotography tips for photographing deep space, on topics such as beginner mistakes, astrophotography equipment, and thorough planning. What are your tips for photographing the night sky? Share them with us in the Comments section.
0 Views
Posted 11/19/21
How can you go about finding photography work, especially when you're just starting out in photography? Commercial photographer Jennifer Pottheiser shares her tips on finding the photography jobs that fit your passion and goals! Do you have any tips of your own you'd like to share? Post them in the Comments section, below.
0 Views
Posted 11/26/21
Landscape photographer and Sony Alpha Collective member Michael Hollender discusses how to plan a National Park photoshoot adventure, including how to find photography locations, how to research your trip, and more! What are your tips for finding new landscape photography locations? Suggest some in the Comments section, below.
1 — 11 of 586 items

Pages

Close

Close

Close