Introducing the Sporting Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS for Mirrorless

Sigma is breaking new ground once again with the release of the 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Sports Lens. This is the first Sports-series lens built specifically for full-frame mirrorless cameras and is also the longest DG DN lens currently available from Sigma. It’s an ultra-telephoto zoom built with refined optics, updated handling features, and a revised form factor that is lighter and smaller than the past SLR-intended versions of this same lens. As the first lens carrying the Sports moniker, this lens is a statement piece as Sigma sees its lineup transcending the fast and distinct primes the company is best known for; this is a super tele-zoom with the speed and optics required for sports and wildlife shooters.

150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Sports lens
150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Sports Lens

You may be thinking “Sigma already has a 150-600mm lens. Wait, they already have two, and one of them is a sports lens… how’s this one different?” The key is in the DG DN suffix in the lens name, which indicates this lens has been built from the ground up specifically for full-frame mirrorless cameras, namely those with Sony E and Leica L lens mounts. Beyond just some additional letters in a name, though, this lens has a new, more advanced optical configuration that caters to mirrorless designs and higher-resolution sensors and does so in a more compact package. It has a new autofocus system, too, and some updated handling aspects, including zoom torque adjustment and customizable function buttons for more intuitive control.

Regarding the optics, this new lens has a denser 25-element/15-group layout that includes six low-dispersion glass elements to suppress color fringing and chromatic aberrations through the zoom range. The glass has also been optimized to maintain sharpness at both ends of the zoom range, and the wide-angle end offers a close minimum focusing distance of 1.9' for more versatility. Sigma also states that bokeh quality was a major concern during the redesign of this lens, and smooth out-of-focus areas with natural compression are a hallmark of the new optical system. Additionally, flare and ghosting are also well-controlled due to a Super Multi-Layer Coating that promotes high-contrast, color-accurate rendering when working in strong light.

Beyond the optical improvements, one of the other noteworthy changes this lens brings is an updated autofocus system. Now catering to mirrorless cameras instead of SLRs, this lens’s focusing performance is quieter and smoother to suit photo and video recording needs. The AF system uses a stepping motor in conjunction with a magnetic sensor that helps accurately guide the focusing lens over greater distances to keep up with subject tracking at great working distances.

Also helping to achieve sharp imagery is an OS image-stabilization system that compensates for up to 4 stops of camera shake, making it easier to use this lens when shooting handheld. Two different stabilization modes can be selected on the lens barrel, and OS modes can be customized on the L-mount version of the lens, via the optional USB Dock. This USB dock also lets L-mount shooters create customized focusing range limits and assign other functions to the three AFL buttons on the lens barrel. Also unique to L-mount users, this lens is compatible with optional TC-1411 1.4x and TC-2011 2x teleconverters for extending the zoom reach even farther.

Optional USB Dock (Left), l TC-1411 1.4x (Middle) and TC-2011 2x (Right) Teleconverters.
Optional USB Dock (left), TC-1411 1.4x (middle) and TC-2011 2x (right) Teleconverters

As a Sports-series lens, Sigma clearly intends for this lens to stand up to the tough conditions and fast-paced shooting environments you’d expect while photographing sports or other fast-moving subjects. As such, the lens features a dust- and splash-resistant barrel with rubber seals at the lens mount and around the focusing and zoom rings and the cover connection points. An oil- and water-repellent coating has also been applied to the front element to resist droplets and to make cleaning the lens easier.

In terms of handling, the lens has a dual-action zoom design, which lets you change the zoom position either by rotating the zoom ring or by push-pulling the barrel to the desired point. Zoom ring torque can also be adjusted to suit your handling preference or just to lock the ring in place to avoid unwanted creeping. The lens is built from Sigma’s distinct Thermally Stable Composite (TSC) materials and aluminum to present a lightweight-but-durable build, and it’s delivered with the removable Arca-type compatible TS-121 Tripod Socket for direct mounting on tripod heads.

The 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Sports is Sigma’s first Sports lens and is a great example of borrowing from its older SLR designs and updating them for a more contemporary mirrorless workflow. Compared to the 150-600mm Sports lens designed for SLRs, this new DG DN lens is 1.6 lb lighter and more than an inch shorter—pretty impressive for a lens that also contains more sophisticated optics, faster AF performance, and still touts a durable, weather-sealed build.

Tech Talk: The NEW Sigma Sport 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Ultra Telephoto Lens

The B&H Event Space brings you the latest photography news from Sigma. Sigma Pro photographer Liam Doran and Sigma’s own Aaron Norberg discuss what’s on the horizon in the Sigma lineup and get all your questions answered live by our pro panel. They also discuss the latest Sigma lens, the Sigma Sport 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Ultra Telephoto Lens, perfect for wildlife and sports photography.

What are your thoughts on Sigma’s first Sports-series lens? Do you have a need for a long-reaching telephoto zoom for your full-frame mirrorless system? Let us know your thoughts on this new, long lens in the Comments section, below.

51 Comments

NEW Sigma Sport 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Ultra Telephoto Lens. I currently have the small Sony A6400 with the Sigma 100-400 E Mount (Equivalent to 600MM). Will the Sigma Sport designed for full frame work well with the A6400?

Yes, the new Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Sport Lens with the Sony E mount can definitely work on the A6400.  There will be a crop factor of 1.5X applied its focal length in this case. 

Is there a sigma teleconvertor that work with Sony E-Mount 

Unfortunately, Sigma hasn't introduced any teleconverters specific to the Sony E mount just yet. If they do, we will make an announcement via the B&H E-Mail Newsletter. 

Anybody tried it on Techart TZE adapter? How good is AF?

To our knowledge, this lens has yet to been tested with Techart TZE Adapter to confirm its performance with it. As the lens becomes available, it is possible that such tests would be performed. 

As this lens I assume is NOT parfocal or perhaps NEAR PARFOCAL, SO GIVEN THAT how much breathing does it exhibit when shooting video and zooming in.

Currently shooting with the 150-600mm Contemporary on an A9 using the Sigma adapter. Have been overall happy with the lens except for speed of autofocus which i sometimes find lacking. Appreciate any thoughts on whether it's worth to switch to this new native e-mount.  Thanks.

For filming video is the image stable (as in it does not float around) while using the lens on a tripod?   The Sony 200-600 is rock solid, as is the Canon 70-200 and 100-400, however the Sigma 60-600 I have floats all over the place making the IS not usable while tripod mounted.

Thanks for the help, I looked online for a manual for this lens but can't find one.

I would assume the image will remain stable, mainly because I cannot think of a reason why it wouldn't (and assuming you have everything mounted in a very secure manner). This Sports lens has two OS modes (one for panning and one for general use) and custom modes for switching how the OS affects the viewfinder mode. Since you indicate you are shooting video, I'm also curious if you are you having issues with the lens-based stabilization or if it's an issue with electronic IS, which is camera-dependent. Another issue may be related to the fact that the 60-600mm is a 10x zoom, and is just physically more unwieldly than the 3x zoom of the 200-600mm or 70-200mm, or the 4x zoom of a 100-400mm. This greater zoom magnification and longer focal length will certainly be more affected by small camera movements or any bumps or vibrations.

Thanks Bjorn, it will be interesting to see.  The Canon 70-200 f4 (first version) for example floats when on a tripod, the new version does not, so I think it could be lens design?

Wondering how I can find out, any chance B&H could ask your Sigma rep?

Where did the 23" minimal close focus come from. Sigma and B&H show the minimal focal distance as 102" or about 8.5' which is about the same as the Sony ( am I wrong?).

One advantage of the Sony is that because it is internally focusing you can go from 200mm to 600mm with one finger. This makes it much easier to locate a fast moving subject and then Zoom in on the subject

Hi Lester- I might be overlooking something somewhere, but I'm not sure where you're seeing 102" listed as the minimum focusing distance. I can confirm, though, that this lens has a minimum focusing distance of 1.9' (or 22.8") and then the closest focusing distance at the 600mm focal length position is 9.2' (or 110.2").

This Sigma lens does have an internal focusing design, but maybe you were referring to an internal zoom? You'd be right that the Sony has this, and the Sigma has an extending barrel, but Sigma does have an adjustable torque setting, so you should be able to set this for a very light setting for easier switching between 150mm and 600mm positions.

Will there be a Nikon mount version?

No official info from Sigma indicates a Z-mount version will be coming soon. For now, they seem to be focusing solely on Sony E and their own L-mount versions, but I agree expanding to other mounts would certainly make a lot more mirrorless shooters happy. Hopefully we'll see it down the road!

I bought the Sigma 150-600 for my Canon this summer and the lens hood locker broke the first day :(

I had a similar problem - I contacted Sigma Customer Service and they were amazing and sent me exactly what I needed to fix the problem.

The minimum focus distance on the Sony is closer to 8 feet; on the Sigma it's listed as about 23".  Would still appreciate any thoughts/advice.

If you had a choice between this lens, and the Sony G 200-600 mm (assuming the higher price of ~$500 not a limitation) - any advice?.  The two lenses weigh the same, but the Sigma seems to have a much, much shorter minimum focus distance (about 28" compared to 7 feet for the Sony).  Max aperture also slightly wider on the Sigma (f5.0 vs 5.6 on the Sony).

As I would expect, the first reports are that the 200-600 is sharper and has better focus tracking for action/wildlife.  However the Sigma's sharpness and tracking is still very good and better than previous products.  I have the 200-600, but the Sigma has my interest based on smaller size for fitting into carry on bag.  

I think you've picked out the main points already- the difference in minimum focus might be a big one for some people as it's a pretty dramatic difference. The focal length and max aperture are also differences that lean more in Sigma's favor, as well as smaller dimensions (Sigma is about 2" shorter in length) and a similar weight. The main benefit, which goes in line with what Bill is saying, is that the Sony lens is a first-party lens, and as such has the advantage of being built by Sony for use on Sony cameras. That's not to mean that the Sigma lens isn't up to similar standards, but Sony has an in-house advantage during development. Also, if any new camera is released by Sony that would require a firmware update of some kind for lens performance issues, then Sony will be a bit faster to get new lens firmware out for their own lenses. Also, if you're using Sony and want to add on a teleconverter, then Sony lens with Sony TCs is the way to go. Either lens will be a solid choice, it just depends on if you want to go for the greater versatility and some spec advantages of the Sigma or the in-system reliability of a Sony lens.

Another point to consider, if you will be hand holding these lenses, the self contained zoom element on the Sony 200-600 makes it much easier to keep balanced while shooting. The extending zoom barrel on the sigmas when you punch in throws off the weight balance for me on the sigma.

Definitely a good point, here. Sigma has integrated a zoom torque switch into their lens to make the feeling of zooming the external barrel a bit more controlled depending on your preference, but you're right that this will still not replicate the feeling or balance of an internal zoom.

Is this lens compatible with Sony's 1.4x and 2x teleconverters?

Officially, I'm guessing the answer will be no. Sigma won't be able to guarantee the performance of their lens on another manufacturer's teleconverter, and they will likely advise against the combination. It's possible the Sony TCs will function on a base level and will physically fit together, but there will be no way of ensuring you'll have adequate focusing speed, focus accuracy, image quality, or settings availability.

What is the min focus distance on the tele end?

Looks like it's 9.2' min focus at the 600mm focal length position.

Is there any improvement to the manual focus over the previous version?

I'm not aware of any issues with manual focus on the previous version, and Sigma didn't specifically call out any improvements in MF with this new lens, so I'm not sure. One difference in the MF arena, though, is that all DG DN lenses do support DMF and AF+MF settings depending on the camera you're using...so for Sony mirrorless shooters, that could be a definite improvement over adapting an older/non-DG DN lens and not having that functionality available.

Amen, John - Where's the Z version?

Also - Sample images - Not all that impressive from what I can see.  What's that blue artifact in the moose's horn, and what about the chromatic aberration near the edges of the frame? (tree trunk at right in moose image, yellow petal also at right in the flower image.)

Where's the "Z" mount? or for that matter a Canon mount..... 

If those companies would let them, I’m sure they would.

It's the million dollar question for sure, but I'm not certain if the issue more falls on Sigma or on Canon & Nikon. You'll notice there are extremely few third-party lenses with AF available from anybody for Canon and Nikon's mirrorless systems at the moment, indicating they seem to be content with keeping relatively closed lens systems for now. Hopefully third-party lenses will become a reality for these mounts sometime in the future, though.

Will this compatible with Sony's teleconverters? 

Officially, I'm guessing the answer will be no. Sigma won't be able to guarantee the performance of their lens on another manufacturer's teleconverter, and they will likely advise against the combination. It's possible the Sony TCs will function on a base level and will physically fit together, but there will be no way of ensuring you'll have adequate focusing speed, focus accuracy, image quality, or settings availability.

I am looking forward to Sigma and Tamron making lenses for RF mount. Would like to see a comparison to Canon RF 100-500mm f/4.5-7.1L IS USM Lens.

I am looking forward to Sigma and Tamron making lenses for EF mount. Would like to see a comparison to Canon RF 100-500mm f/4.5-7.1L IS USM Lens.

Assuming you mean RF mount, and if so, I fully agree. I think it's only a matter of time before we start seeing third-party lenses for both Canon RF and Nikon Z, but for now it seems like Sony and the L-Mount Alliance brands are the way to go for greater lens flexibility.

Is Sigma ever going to get in the RF game?

No official info from Sigma indicates an RF-mount version will be coming soon. For now, they seem to be focusing solely on Sony E and their own L-mount versions, but I agree expanding to other mounts would certainly make a lot more mirrorless shooters happy. Hopefully we'll see it down the road!

I would have assumed that there is more demand from Canon customers than Leica.

Would be good to have it in a Nikon F mount and useable on the ZtoN adapter

Very unlikely we'll see this lens in an F-mount version as the DG DN lenses are specifically built for the shorter focal flange distances of mirrorless systems. There is the 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports lens available for Nikon F (https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1082151-REG/sigma_150_600mm_f_5_6_3_dg_os.html) but it's an older design with slightly different optics and focusing system.

Looks great, will there be a Z mount version?  I have the same lens now in F mount but would love to get rid of that adapter.

No official info from Sigma indicates a Z-mount version will be coming soon. For now, they seem to be focusing solely on Sony E and their own L-mount versions, but I agree expanding to other mounts would certainly make a lot more mirrorless shooters happy. Hopefully we'll see it down the road!

It appears to be a very impressive lens.  I have the original for full frame SLRs and found it to be disappointing at best. When Tamron makes a version for the Nikon Z cameras I would love to try it out.

I'm looking forward to see how this new version stacks up to the older SLR versions, too. With Sigma's other DG DN makeovers of past lenses, they've done an impressive job translating the lens over to mirrorless.

Would this work well with the Sony A6000?

Yep, no problems working with the Sony E version of this lens and an a6000. You'll have an equivalent 225-900mm zoom range on the a6000, because of the smaller APS-C sensor, but the lens is fully compatible.

It will work with any E mount Sony camera but is intended for FE, full frame, not APS -C. On an APS-C, like your A6000, focal length will be 225-900.

And with 2x => 550 - 1800mm :)

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