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Posted 04/13/21
Continuing to round out its full-frame mirrorless system, Canon has just launched a trio of RF-mount prime lenses that contribute to this maturing and expanding system. Focusing on the long end of the focal length spectrum, Canon is introducing a fresh take on the popular 100mm f/2.8 macro option, as well as releasing 400mm and 600mm super-telephoto primes for the sports and wildlife crowd. As might be expected, all three lenses are L Series primes, indicating their optical excellence and durable physical designs. Also, in a surprise move, Canon has revealed the development of the EOS R3 —a brand-new full-frame mirrorless model designed to sit between the R5 and 1D X Mark III. More details on the R3 are coming soon but you can read about what we know right here on Explora. The RF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM is the first true macro lens for the RF system and is the natural follow-up to the beloved EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro lens for SLRs. Taking the same short-telephoto focal length but upping the maximum magnification beyond life size, to 1.4x, and shortening the minimum focusing distance to 10.6", this new close-focusing prime also features a unique SA (spherical aberration) Control Ring. Canon RF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM Lens A new feature for Canon, this control ring provides the opportunity to fine-tune bokeh rendering: At one end, images have smooth and blurry bokeh and at the other, imagery takes on a more prominent ring-shaped bokeh. Beyond the optics, this lens has been fitted with an Optical Image Stabilizer, which corrects for up to 5 stops of camera shake, or up to 8 stops when used with a compatible camera body featuring IBIS, and the lens also features a Dual Nano USM focusing system for smooth, responsive, and silent AF performance. © Creative Soul © Creative Soul © Dennis Prescott © Dennis Prescott © Rebecca Nichols © Rebecca Nichols Canon RF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM Lens sample photos For sports and wildlife shooters, nothing beats a fast and long-reaching telephoto prime, and this is where the RF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM fits in. It’s a versatile focal length with an impressively bright design and uses trusted technology and a proven optical design comprised of fluorite and Super UD glass. In fact, if you were a fan of the EF 400mm f/2.8, there’s a lot of similarities between these two lenses; optically, they’re identical, and physically, the lens has just been updated for the RF mount. Canon RF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens The Optical Image Stabilizer compensates for up to 5.5 stops of camera shake, and the USM focusing system yields snappy AF performance and works with programmable AF preset buttons for faster performance. It’s compatible with the RF 1.4x and 2x Extenders and works with drop-in 52mm screw-in filters. © Tyler Stableford 2x Extender © Tyler Stableford © Tyler Stableford © Tyler Stableford © Tyler Stableford 1.4 Extender © Tyler Stableford Canon RF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens sample photos Even longer is the RF 600mm f/4L IS USM lens, which adds a respectable amount of reach, compared to the 400mm, while being just one stop slower. Cherished for working with smaller or even more distant subjects, this super-telephoto is a choice lens for birders, wildlife shooters, and some sports applications, too. Like the RF 400mm, this 600mm gets its optics from its EF 600mm f/4L predecessor, including the fluorite and Super UD glass that helps it achieve impressive sharpness, clarity, and color accuracy throughout the aperture range. Canon RF 600mm f/4L IS USM Lens The lens has been updated for the mirrorless RF mount and features an Optical Image Stabilizer to compensate for up to 5.5 stops of camera shake, and the USM focusing system offers quiet and quick focusing performance. Both super-teles also sport a rotating tripod mount with a removable foot, both accept the same 52mm drop-in filters, and this 600mm also has the same dust- and weather-resistant exterior for use in harsh weather. © Zak Noyle © Zak Noyle © Zak Noyle © Zak Noyle © Zak Noyle © Zak Noyle Canon RF 600mm f/4L IS USM Lens sample photos What are your thoughts on Canon’s latest RF-mount lenses? Have you been waiting for any of these telephoto options for your RF camera? Let us know your thoughts on Canon’s new lenses, in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 04/12/21
Ever the exciting combination, FUJIFILM has announced the latest high-speed, wide-angle prime: the XF 18mm f/1.4 R LM WR lens. This 27mm equivalent prime is designed for the APS-C-format X Series and blends the versatile everyday wide field of view with an impressively bright design for working in low light and for controlling depth of field. In typical FUJIFILM fashion, too, the lens also features a compact, weather-resistant exterior, a quick linear AF motor, and intuitive tactile controls. This will be the second 18mm lens in FUJIFILM’s lineup, although it’s a very different type of lens compared to the f/2 pancake version. This 18mm f/1.4 is focused on speed, and the bright f/1.4 aperture is a valuable tool for working in difficult lighting conditions while shooting handheld. Another distinction from the 18mm f/2 is a more advanced optical design; this new f/1.4 version has three aspherical elements and one extra-low dispersion element to correct a variety of aberrations that minimize distortion while boosting sharpness and color accuracy. In terms of focusing, this wide-angle lens features internal focusing, controlled by a linear AF motor, affording quick and quiet performance suitable for stills and video. A minimum focusing distance of 7.9" suits working with close-up subjects, and the lens is also fitted with a manual focus ring and a manual aperture ring for intuitive tactile control. Despite not being quite as small or pancake-shaped as the 18mm f/2, this 18mm f/1.4 is still an impressively sleek lens, measuring 3" long and weighing just about 13 oz. It has a weather-sealed exterior and is also freezeproof for working in temperatures down to 14°F. What are your thoughts on FUJIFILM’s XF 18mm f/1.4 R LM WR? Are you in need of a fast, general-use wide-angle lens? What types of subjects would you photograph with this lens? Let us know, in the Comments section below.
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Posted 04/09/21
Visual content creator Kristi Hemric shares her iPhone photography tips to level up your content creation game! Dig deep into Live and Pano modes, try out long exposure, and even turn your phone upside down on your next photoshoot for richer, more creative photos that fit your personal vision. How do you get creative with your smartphone photos? Tell us how you'll incorporate Kristi's tips, and share your own in the Comments section, below!
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Posted 04/06/21
Oozing all the retro style you’d expect from FUJIFILM, the new INSTAX Mini 40 is the latest sleek and fun camera in the company’s INSTAX instant film lineup. Despite its trendy and classic appearance, the Mini 40 is built to be as intuitive as possible for an instant film camera—it’s really just a point-and-shoot in the clearest sense of the term. It’s a stylish camera that’s fun to use, easy to carry, and perfect for producing those oh-so-shareable miniature prints with your friends. The INSTAX Mini 40 is the latest in FUJIFILM’s every-growing line of instant film cameras, and it takes the popular INSTAX Mini film. This small rectangular film format measures 2.4 x 1.8", or roughly about the size of a credit card. Functionally, the camera operates like many others from the INSTAX lineup—it has an optical viewfinder, a 60mm f/12.7 lens, and a built-in flash that works in conjunction with the auto-exposure metering and automatic shutter speed adjustments to help ensure every shot turns out just right. The Mini 40 is also fitted with a dedicated Selfie Mode, which is really just a close-focusing setting for working with subjects within an 11.8-19.7" range, or what amounts to about arm’s length. There’s a mirror attached to the front of the lens to help line up those selfies accurately, too. What else does the INSTAX Mini 40 bring to the table? Its classy, good looks, of course. Fundamentally, the Mini 40 isn’t a dramatically different camera than other INSTAX Mini offerings, but it is a desirable mixture of all the things that make INSTAX shooting so much fun in the first place. What are your thoughts on FUJIFILM’s latest instant film camera? Are you a fan of the retro styling and simple operation? Let us know your thoughts in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 03/25/21
Sandra Coan shares her portrait photography tips for creating natural-looking, soft light using strobes. Coan uses this one-light setup in her family and newborn photography. What kind of portrait lighting is your favorite? What do you use to light portraits? Share your own tips and techniques in the Comments section, below, and be sure to come back to BandH.com for many more of our engaging videos.
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Posted 03/25/21
Never afraid to be unique, Sigma has just released the fp L mirrorless camera. The second member of the fp Series of compact, modular, hybrid cameras, the fp L storms in with an all-new, higher-resolution sensor, improved focusing performance, and even brings an accessory electronic viewfinder to the system. When the original fp was released in 2019, it stood out due to its minimal design and distinct feature set that clearly catered more to video applications over stills. The fp L is a revised take on this approach, with more attention given to photography needs, overall speed, and even handling, without giving up its characteristically small stature and customizable ergonomics. Using the 61MP sensor to show off detail and texture. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. The Top Features What are the new features the fp L brings to the plate? Here’s everything you need to know in quick form. Full-frame 61MP BSI CMOS sensor: Up from the 24MP sensor of the original model, the higher-res sensor boosts detail while still keeping an impressive dynamic range and sensitivity range. Its back-illuminated design also yields an especially clean image with low noise. Phase-detection and contrast-detection AF: Compared to the contrast-detection-only design of the original, the hybrid focusing system of the fp L proves to be faster, better for tracking moving subjects, and more precise in tricky lighting conditions. There’s now an EVF for the system: The EVF-11 Electronic Viewfinder is an accessory component for both the fp L and the fp and is a 3.68m-dot OLED panel with a 90° upward tilting design for low-angle shooting. It’s available in a bundle with the fp L or separately for use with existing bodies. Same exact body design as the original fp: Not necessarily a new feature but, rather, a reaffirmation of the successful design of the compact and portable form factor of the first fp. This also means that all previous accessory grips, cages, the hot shoe unit, and loupe are all compatible with the new model. Continuous power via USB-C: The original fp allowed charging the battery inside the camera while it was turned off. The fp L lets you continuously power the camera via USB-C, which is perfect for time-lapse work, recording longer clips, or for working with the camera in a stationary position, like if using it as a webcam. Improved focusing speeds help catch a quick-moving train. Taken with the 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Contemporary lens. A Look Back Before digging more into the new features of the fp L, it’s important to take a look at Sigma’s history of camera design, and why the fp feels like a significant step for the company as a camera manufacturer. Prior to the original fp, Sigma was best known for its use of Foveon sensors, which are still to this day among the most unique sensors available due to their immense color depth and sharpness, albeit with the tradeoffs of reduced sensitivity, dynamic range, and higher noise levels. The fp from 2019 was Sigma’s first camera to adopt the more conventional Bayer array sensor, which offers improved flexibility in terms of dynamic range and sensitivity; as well as benefits video recording capabilities. More than the unique-for-Sigma Bayer sensor, the original fp stood out in the field of mirrorless camera designs for a number of other reasons: It’s still one of the most compact full-frame models available; it doesn’t contain a physical shutter, rather relying on an electronic shutter function; and it’s designed to be modular so each user can build the camera up however they see fit—two different hand grip options are available from Sigma, along with a loupe viewfinder, an accessory hot shoe, compatible third-party cages and grips, and so on. Late afternoon scene mixing harsh, deep shadows with bright, sunlit surfaces. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. Looking Forward The fp L doesn’t stray from these unique features but does offer a wealth of refinements to push this bold release further, especially with how photographers approach the concept of a modular and multimedia camera. The original fp didn’t quite click with many photographers due to its relatively slow focusing performance, the lack of an electronic viewfinder, and because of the lack of a built-in hot shoe and subsequently cumbersome method for working with flash. Responding to this, Sigma made sure to address most of these points—faster phase-detection focusing and a new accessory EVF—although it still has the electronic shutter only design, and associated 1/15-second flash sync speed, and likely won’t be anyone’s first camera choice for flash photography applications. Conversely, though, the plus side to omitting a physical shutter from a camera’s design is the smaller, lighter-weight design, quiet operation, and theoretically improved durability since there are fewer moving parts. Assuming you’re a photographer who can forgo the need for faster flash sync, then the fp L rewards with the sensor design that includes phase-detection AF for accurate moving subject tracking. In use, this felt like one of the more apparent upgrades over the fp, along with the higher resolution. Focusing is snappier and more accurate, regardless of the type of subject with which you’re working. The 61MP sensor is great for picking out and emphasizing details in ordinary scenes. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. And then there is the 61MP resolution, which puts the fp L squarely in the realm of an objectively high-resolution camera. In practice, this spec is sometimes a bit too much resolution, but I don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing. With the spare resolution, so to speak, Sigma also incorporated a new Crop Zoom feature for “zooming into” the scene by simply cropping in from the full-frame image area. It’s a nice tool to have in-camera, since you can preview the look of a tighter crop while shooting, especially if you’re just working with a single lens that’s a bit too wide for the shot you want. In addition to the major updates, the fp L also received some more minor, but welcomed, additions: There is now a true 24.00 fps frame rate for video recording, Duotone and Powder Blue color modes have been added, custom camera settings can be saved and shared to other cameras via a QR code, you can take screenshots of the camera’s rear LCD, and the Director’s Viewfinder has been updated with new cine cam models and custom frame line options. More emphasis on details with this shot of peeling paint just before sunset. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. fp L vs fp Comparing the fp L to the original fp, you’ll see the few changes between the models and how they look on paper. The interesting thing about comparing the two cameras, though, is that most of the differences are just an “on paper” matter, since they share the same body design and user interface. On the other hand, this comparison goes to show how just a few changes to a camera’s spec list can truly shake up how one interprets a camera. fp L fp 61MP BSI CMOS 36 x 24mm; Bayer Array Sensor 24.6MP BSI CMOS 35.9 x 23.9mm; Bayer Array UHD 4K up to 30p FHD 1080 up to 120p CinemaDNG 8-bit recording Video (Internal) UHD 4K up to 30p FHD 1080 up to 120p CinemaDNG 8-bit recording DCI 4K at 24p Raw 12-bit recording Video (External) DCI 4K at 24p Raw 12-bit recording Phase-detection and contrast-detection Autofocus Contrast-detection only ISO 100-25600 Expandable ISO 6-102400 Base ISO—Stills: ISO 100/400 Base ISO—CinemaDNG 12-bit and raw output: ISO 100/1250 Base ISO—MOV/CinemaDNG 10-bit, 8-bit: ISO 100/250 ISO Sensitivity ISO 100-25600 Expandable ISO 6-102400 Base ISO—Stills: ISO 100/640 Base ISO—CinemaDNG 12-bit and raw output: ISO 100/3200 Base ISO—MOV/CinemaDNG 10-bit, 8-bit: ISO 100/640 Electronic shutter 1/8000 sec to 30 sec Bulb up to 300 sec Flash sync up to 1/15 sec Shutter Speed Electronic shutter 1/8000 sec to 30 sec Bulb up to 300 sec Flash sync up to 1/30 sec Up to 10 fps Continuous Shooting Up to 18 fps Compatible with EVF-11 EVF Compatible with EVF-11 via future firmware update 3.15" 2.1m-dot touchscreen LCD LCD 3.15" 2.1m-dot touchscreen LCD BP-51 lithium-ion battery Approx. 240 shots/charge Battery BP-51 lithium-ion battery Approx. 280 shots/charge USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C HDMI Type-D 3.5mm Microphone Remote and timecode via microphone port Interface USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C HDMI Type-D 3.5mm Microphone Remote and timecode via microphone port 4.4 x 2.8 x 1.8" Dimensions 4.4 x 2.8 x 1.8" 15.1 oz with battery and SD card Weight 14.9 oz with battery and SD card Who Is the fp L For? When the original fp was released, most of the reviews and debates talked about who the camera was actually designed for. While I got along with it, surprisingly from a photographic perspective, most saw it as a compact cine camera that could handle photo tasks in a pinch. The fp L is clearly setting out to sway this balance back to a 50/50 split of users, welcoming both the photographers who want to shoot video and the cinematographers who want to shoot photos to the user base. I’m much more of a photographer, and I see the fp L as a valuable tool despite its apparent drawbacks. The compact size, quietness, and uniquely customizable design far outweigh the slow flash sync for the type of shooting I mainly do. Landscapes, travel shooting, natural light portraiture and lifestyle imagery, and even product shots and still lifes using constant light are all perfect subjects to tackle with the fp L. It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s the fp L using phase-detection focusing to keep up with fast-moving distant subjects! Taken with the 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Contemporary lens. Another strength of Sigma’s fp-series cameras, too, is their participation in the L-Mount Alliance —a three-way partnership between Sigma, Leica, and Panasonic—that further contributes to it being one of the most adaptable systems out there, which is perfect for shooters who like to dabble between manufacturers. And Then the EVF Directly confronting the many requests for a “real viewfinder” on the original fp, Sigma has responded with the EVF-11 Electronic Viewfinder. In fp system fashion, this finder is an auxiliary EVF and attaches to the side of the camera body, much like the included HU-11 Hot Shoe Unit does. This optional EVF connects via the USB-C port and is secured via the side ¼"-20 mount, and the EVF itself has additional headphone and USB-C ports and another ¼"-20 mount for the strap. The finder has a 90° upward tilting design that suits shooting at low angles, and it has an integrated switch for changing between the EVF and LCD for shooting and reviewing images. While the switch works great for changing, it would have been great to see Sigma incorporate an eye sensor for automatic switching between the body and the finder. Otherwise, this 3.68m-dot OLED is just as good as pretty much any other EVF on the market and felt like it had minimal impact on overall battery life in a regular day of shooting. The EVF-11 is the perfect tool for working in bright and direct light conditions, such as during sunset. Taken with the 65mm f/2 DG DN Contemporary lens. It’s no surprise that I am a fan of the original fp, and it goes without saying that the fp L makes even more sense to me from a photographer’s standpoint. It’s still an undeniably quirky camera, but the fp L tames the quirkiness quite a bit and stands as a serious offering for a variety of image-making tasks. What are your thoughts on Sigma’s sophomore L-mount mirrorless effort, the fp L? Are you a fan of the modular design and unique feature set of the fp L? Let us know your thoughts in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 03/23/21
Hot on the heels of its latest G Master lens, Sony has just announced three new compact primes in its G Series lineup: the FE 24mm f/2.8 G, FE 40mm f/2.5 G, and FE 50mm f/2.5 G. Adopting many of the advanced design features of their larger siblings, the trio delivers exceptional optical performance in a form factor perfect for everyday carry. Although created for full-frame E-mount cameras (hence the FE designation), their compact build pairs nicely with APS-C models where the 24mm becomes 36mm, 40mm becomes 60mm, and 50mm becomes 75mm. Priority was given to making these lenses small, so that they won’t take up much space in your camera bag, and light, so they won’t weigh you down while shooting. Consequently, each lens measures only 1.8" in length and weighs between 5.7 and 6.1 ounces, depending on the model. All of the lenses incorporate aspherical elements to combat aberration and distortions, as well as extra-low dispersion glass to reduce color fringing and chromatic aberration. A seven-bladed circular aperture helps achieve smooth, round bokeh. Complementing the versatile focal lengths of the new lenses are minimum focusing distances that benefit close-up capture: The 24mm allows you to get as close as 7.1" (manual focus) / 9.4" (autofocus), the 40mm can get 9.8" (MF) / 11" (AF), and the 50mm can focus as close as 12.2" (MF) / 13.8" (AF). Each lens features two linear motors to provide quick and responsive autofocusing for still capture, and quiet performance when recording video. The physical design of the new lenses incorporates some of the most useful features of Sony’s top-tier lenses. The aperture ring can be adjusted in 1/3-stop increments, or de-clicked via a switch on the side of the lens barrel for video applications. An auto/manual focus mode switch is incorporated for moving quickly between focusing modes or fine-tuning focus. Finally, a customizable focus hold button can be used for its namesake or reassigned, based on user preference. All of the lenses boast a sleek aluminum design that is dust and moisture resistant, adding to their appeal as everyday carry options. Settings are engraved into the lens barrel, presenting both an aesthetically pleasing touch as well as adding to the durability of the lens. What do you think of Sony’s latest G Series lenses? Which of Sony’s mirrorless cameras do you think would pair best with them? Share your thoughts in the Comments section, below!
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Posted 03/18/21
New York City-based fashion and beauty photographer Lara Jade shares her fashion photography tips on topics such as finding subjects to photograph and marketing yourself, and talks about the difference between editorial and commercial photography. Are you new to the world of fashion and beauty photography, or a seasoned pro? Share your thoughts about this video, along with your own tips, in the Comments section, below!
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Posted 03/16/21
Sony has officially entered the realm of extremely fast glass with its newest addition to the G Master family: the FE 50mm f/1.2 GM lens. Not only does the new lens add one of the most popular prime focal lengths to Sony’s top-tier lineup, but it also becomes Sony’s fastest E-mount lens to date. The flexibility of the 50mm focal length and brightness of an f/1.2 aperture make this lens an ideal candidate for portraiture and fashion, whether working in the studio or out on location. The impressively compact and lightweight build of this lens—its length and weight match that of its ½-stop slower predecessor—should attract street, event, and even landscape photographers looking for a high-performing prime. Sharp Focus and Soft Bokeh To capture exacting images with razor-thin depth of field, the new G Master takes advantage of Sony’s latest advances in lens technology and consists of 14 elements arranged in 10 groups. Three XA (extreme aspherical) elements join forces to combat aberration, maintain corner-to-corner sharpness, and produce smooth out-of-focus areas. A newly developed 11-blade circular aperture further contributes to clean and natural bokeh, whether in the foreground or background of an image. Combine these attributes with a minimum focusing distance of 1.3' and maximum magnification of 0.17x and the lens becomes a solid option for capturing close-up subjects. Fast AF and Intuitive Design The 50mm f/1.2 utilizes four XD (extreme dynamic) motors for fast, precise, and quiet autofocusing. Responsive manual focusing permits quick and smooth adjustments when shooting stills and expanded creative possibilities when recording video. Like other G Master lenses, a focus mode switch is included on the side of the lens barrel for quick toggling between focus modes. New is the addition of a second focus hold button on the lens barrel, which can be customized to your preference. Familiar to G Master veterans is the inclusion of a de-click switch for the aperture, a useful feature when recording video. Built to Last Like past G Master lenses, the 50mm f/1.2 features hybrid metal-and-plastic construction to balance weight and durability while providing protection against dust and moisture. The front element features a fluorine coating to prevent fingerprints, dirt, water, and other contaminants from sticking to its surface. How Does It Compare? The FE 50mm f/1.2 GM is a major upgrade compared to Sony’s Planar T* FE 50mm f/1.4 ZA lens and a direct competitor to Canon’s RF 50mm f/1.2L USM and Nikon’s NIKKOR Z 50mm f/1.2 S lenses. One of the most impressive aspects of the new prime is how Sony was able to maintain the same size and weight as its f/1.4 model while adding 36% more optical surface to achieve an extra ½ stop of brightness. It matches the length and weight of Canon’s f/1.2, making them both lighter and smaller than Nikon’s version. From a usability standpoint, the Sony features more on-lens tactile controls than the Canon, while the Nikon offers a unique OLED display on the barrel of the lens. Model Maximum Aperture Length Weight Optical Construction Diaphragm Blades Sony FE 50mm f/1.2 GM f/1.2 4.25" 1.7 lb 14 elements, 10 groups 11 Sony Planar T* FE 50mm f/1.4 ZA f/1.4 4.25" 1.7 lb 12 elements, 9 groups 11 Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L USM f/1.2 4.25" 2.1 lb 15 elements, 9 groups 10 Nikon NIKKOR Z 50mm f/1.2 S f/1.2 5.9" 2.4 lb 17 elements, 15 groups 9 Also New from Sony: Camera-Mount Bluetooth Wireless Audio Sony’s announcement of the FE 50mm f/1.2 GM lens follows the release of a pair of audio upgrades aimed at mirrorless video shooters: the ECM-W2BT Camera-Mount Digital Bluetooth Wireless Microphone System and ECM-LV1 Compact Stereo Lavalier Microphone. The ECM-W2BT was designed for vloggers, journalists, and other video content creators seeking an on-camera wireless mic solution. The system consists of a receiver that attaches directly to the MI shoe of compatible Sony cameras and a clip-on transmitter with built-in omnidirectional microphone for quick setup. Each features built-in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that can last up to 9 hours when attached to the MI shoe or 3 hours on their own. Utilizing Bluetooth connectivity, the system can operate up to 650' in good visibility. Microphones are built into the transmitter and receiver, allowing the camera operator and talent to be recorded at the same time. A moisture- and dust-resistant design means you can use the system outdoors with confidence under less-than-ideal conditions. For low-profile audio recording scenarios, the ECM-LV1 lavalier connects with the ECM-W2BT’s transmitter via a 3.3' cable and 3.5mm TRS connector, minimizing the visible footprint of your audio setup. The lav records stereo audio via two omnidirectional capsules. A foam windscreen is included to minimize noise during recording. What do you think of Sony’s latest announcements? Are you itching to shoot with your Sony camera at f/1.2? Ready to incorporate wireless audio into your video setup? Share your thoughts in the Comments section, below!
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Posted 03/05/21
Portrait photographer Claudia Paul shares her tips on how to shoot portraits of non-models, such as making a connection with your clients and making them feel comfortable. Tell us how you plan to apply these tips in the Comments section, below.
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