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4393 Views
Posted 03/14/18
In the following video, photographer David Flores runs through an assortment of flash modifiers that you can use to elevate the quality of light from your speedlight. Flores begins with the classic dome diffuser, moves into more unique options like lenses, and mentions radio systems. If you want to get the most out of an on-camera flash, this video will provide a great starting point. We hope you enjoy the video, and invite you to view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at BandH.com.
1711 Views
Posted 06/05/18
In this B&H Online video, New York City-based photographer Charles Chessler shares images from his ongoing project, "Agreeable Strangers," and talks about his approach to asking complete strangers for a street portrait. He discusses being present and in the moment with your subjects and, amidst the hubbub of everything happening on the street, getting your subjects to be present with you... getting them to "drop in." Chessler also discusses gear and settings, keeping in mind that the technology exists in service of humanity and the interaction. We hope you enjoy the video, and invite you to view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at BandH.com.
1209 Views
Posted 04/27/18
At B&H’s 2018 Depth of Field conference, wedding photographer Susan Stripling explains how she approaches using flash and artificial lighting to mimic the natural light of the sun. She reveals her philosophies, techniques, and setups to help us understand the importance of making specific choices as a photographer, to achieve a desired final product.
1167 Views
Posted 07/10/14
In this Event Space class B&H Maven David Brommer will elaborate on his thought process and share his mobile iPad-based workflow.
638 Views
Posted 04/27/18
Photographer Sal Cincotta joins B&H at Depth of Field 2018 to share his professional insights into wedding photography—particularly regarding lighting and equipment—as well as the philosophies that have helped him succeed as a professional photographer.
591 Views
Posted 01/07/14
Mel DiGiacomo will discuss how to know the light, how to learn the vocabulary of your lenses, and how to put aside the technical aspects and keep thinking to a minimum to keep your shooting instinctual.
549 Views
Posted 01/14/15
If you are lucky enough (and talented enough) to have a long career in photography, over time your work takes you down many roads, and Mel DiGiacomo is one of those photographers. Whether he is shooting the US Open or a wedding, on assignment for top magazines, or doing self-assignments on the street in New York City or in his small town in New Jersey, DiGiacomo is one hard-working photographer whose ability to adapt to a wide variety of situations and come back with the pictures holds lessons for any aspiring photographer. Photographers are always looking for subjects, and in so doing, often choose the street. As Dorothy Norman said, "You don’t have to go fifty feet from your house to find a photograph." And DiGiacomo is a great example of this. He is as adept at photographing the sports of the children in his town as he is shooting the action at a professional sporting event, or on the streets in NYC or at a wedding. While street photography can be accomplished on any street, New York City in particular is a place that lends itself to the art (after all, our sidewalks are 18% gray!). But street shooting does require a certain discipline. In this class, photographer Mel DiGiacomo discusses how to know the light, how to learn the vocabulary of your lenses, and how to put aside the technical aspects and keep thinking to a minimum to keep your shooting instinctual. DiGiacomo looks for human behavior, whether on the street, in a classrom, or at a wedding, and follows the advice of Walker Evans: "Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You’re not here long." DiGiacomo will get you thinking in different ways to help stretch your photographic muscles.
481 Views
Posted 04/27/18
Photographer Robert Evans talks about how the simplicity of certain images can make them really stand out. He stresses that beyond an individual photographer’s vision and personality, there are other traits that are integral to capturing great photos—being bold, taking creative risks, and shooting from the heart.
460 Views
Posted 06/10/14
Every photograph tells a story. Do you want to learn some techniques to help you become a more eloquent storyteller? Selective focus is a technique that can help you control which part of your image stands out. Understanding selective focus will expand your creativity. Whether you are a photojournalist or traditional photographer, this technique will enhance your storytelling skills in every photo. It will help you to fully explain and amplify your visual statement. The nice thing is that it is not limited to weddings and portraits—once you understand how to use it and why it works, selective focus can be employed in every facet of your photography including editorial, commercial, advertising, landscape, and industrial applications. Your presenter, award-winning photographer Emanuele “Manny” Pontoriero, will explain and show what selective focus is and how to achieve it using the tools and equipment that will make it easy to accomplish. Pontoriero will also reveal to you how to incorporate the thought process of creating memorable photos through selective focus. This is a must-see presentation to help you learn how to improve your photographic storytelling vocabulary.
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