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173 Views
Posted 08/19/12
Food Photography: Concept to Completion
149 Views
Posted 02/07/13
"This is a question often asked of photographers with a range of answers. There are some photographer's who work with an austere kit, carrying a camera, a few lenses, and the bare essentials while others carry everything including the kitchen sink."
270 Views
Posted 08/19/13
In this episode of Real Exposures, David Brommer interviews photographer and master black-and-white printer Sid Kaplan.
591 Views
Posted 01/07/14
Mel DiGiacomo will discuss how to know the light, how to learn the vocabulary of your lenses, and how to put aside the technical aspects and keep thinking to a minimum to keep your shooting instinctual.
186 Views
Posted 06/20/14
In his lecture, Harvey Stein shares aspects of a career that spans more than 40 years of consistent and impressive work in photography. He shows and discusses work from his newest book, Harlem Street Portraits,  published last October. In addition, he shows some images from his four other books, Parallels: A Look At Twins (1978), Artists Observed  (1986), Coney Island (1998), Movimento: Glimpses of Italian Street Life (2006), and Coney Island 40 Years. Stein also discusses ways of approaching publishers, and strategies for getting long-term projects into book form. Stein is well known for his strong, close-up and involving street photography, as well as his sensitive portraits of people from around the world. For him, photography is a way to learn about life, living, and self. “Mostly, I do long-term projects that are of personal interest. I photograph situations, people and places I don’t know and need to learn about. Photography is the most meaningful thing I could ever do. It is my way of saying, ‘I am here,’ and my way of sharing some of my life and understanding of the world with others.”
1167 Views
Posted 07/10/14
In this Event Space class B&H Maven David Brommer will elaborate on his thought process and share his mobile iPad-based workflow.
549 Views
Posted 01/14/15
If you are lucky enough (and talented enough) to have a long career in photography, over time your work takes you down many roads, and Mel DiGiacomo is one of those photographers. Whether he is shooting the US Open or a wedding, on assignment for top magazines, or doing self-assignments on the street in New York City or in his small town in New Jersey, DiGiacomo is one hard-working photographer whose ability to adapt to a wide variety of situations and come back with the pictures holds lessons for any aspiring photographer. Photographers are always looking for subjects, and in so doing, often choose the street. As Dorothy Norman said, "You don’t have to go fifty feet from your house to find a photograph." And DiGiacomo is a great example of this. He is as adept at photographing the sports of the children in his town as he is shooting the action at a professional sporting event, or on the streets in NYC or at a wedding. While street photography can be accomplished on any street, New York City in particular is a place that lends itself to the art (after all, our sidewalks are 18% gray!). But street shooting does require a certain discipline. In this class, photographer Mel DiGiacomo discusses how to know the light, how to learn the vocabulary of your lenses, and how to put aside the technical aspects and keep thinking to a minimum to keep your shooting instinctual. DiGiacomo looks for human behavior, whether on the street, in a classrom, or at a wedding, and follows the advice of Walker Evans: "Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You’re not here long." DiGiacomo will get you thinking in different ways to help stretch your photographic muscles.
37 Views
Posted 01/14/15
In this class, photographer Mel DiGiacomo discusses how to know the light, how to learn the vocabulary of your lenses, and how to put aside the technical aspects and keep thinking to a minimum to keep your shooting instinctually. DiGiacomo looks for human behavior, whether on the street, in a classroom, or at a wedding, and follows the advice of Walker Evans: “Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You're not here long.” DiGiacomo will get you thinking in different ways to help stretch your photography muscles.
7719 Views
Posted 07/29/15
Along with numerous examples of his gorgeous work, renowned food photographer Andrew Scrivani discusses the core components of good food photography and how to induce the emotions that food arouses. He talks of light play, props, using a darker palette to help colors pop, infusing process shots with artistry, and the importance of telling a story—and selling emotion—with your photographs. Scrivani also invites us to see his work environment and makes clear that with a very basic setup, good styling, and the freedom of handheld shooting, you can create mouth-watering images. We hope you enjoy the video, and invite you to view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at BandH.com.
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