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Posted 05/20/21
In this presentation, Leica Akademie instructor Dotan Saguy analyzes where most street photographers go wrong and provides 10 ways for you to stand out. From photography composition to location, Saguy shows you how to step up your photo game. Which of these tips will you be taking to the street? Let us know in the Comments, below, and share your own recommendations for outstanding street photography.
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Posted 12/26/20
Night photography has become increasingly popular and accessible in recent years, and the experience of photographing the landscape under a starry night sky is incomparably rewarding. In this seminar, Lance Keimig of National Parks at Night shares his techniques for light painting, light writing, and low light landscape photography. Are you a fan of night photography? Share your experiences with us in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 12/05/20
In this seminar, Dolphia Nandi shares her food photography tips. Go behind the scenes on her photoshoots and learn how to utilize food styling, angle, props, backgrounds, and more in your photographic compositions. Are you a food photographer or eager to get started? Share your questions and favorite tips for mouth-watering images in the Comments section, below! Similar photography tutorials 5 Tips for Better Food Photography with Cheat Day Eats How to Make Fake Ice Cream for Food Photography Food Landscape Photography at Home How to Make a Recipe Video for Social Media
1711 Views
Posted 06/05/18
In this B&H Online video, New York City-based photographer Charles Chessler shares images from his ongoing project, "Agreeable Strangers," and talks about his approach to asking complete strangers for a street portrait. He discusses being present and in the moment with your subjects and, amidst the hubbub of everything happening on the street, getting your subjects to be present with you... getting them to "drop in." Chessler also discusses gear and settings, keeping in mind that the technology exists in service of humanity and the interaction. We hope you enjoy the video, and invite you to view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at BandH.com.
3817 Views
Posted 08/14/15
Take a deep dive into making effective use of flash in your photography with National Geographic photographer Bob Krist, who's honed his techniques over decades of shooting for magazines and crafting best-selling photo books. You'll learn how to create natural-looking flash photos and blend flash with available light. He covers technique, including fill flash and how to use it, slow synch flash—which he calls the most important of flash techniques—bounce flash, and using found surfaces and reflectors. You'll discover how to take your flash to new dimensions with multiple flash, light modifier, and complementary filtration, and more.
549 Views
Posted 01/14/15
If you are lucky enough (and talented enough) to have a long career in photography, over time your work takes you down many roads, and Mel DiGiacomo is one of those photographers. Whether he is shooting the US Open or a wedding, on assignment for top magazines, or doing self-assignments on the street in New York City or in his small town in New Jersey, DiGiacomo is one hard-working photographer whose ability to adapt to a wide variety of situations and come back with the pictures holds lessons for any aspiring photographer. Photographers are always looking for subjects, and in so doing, often choose the street. As Dorothy Norman said, "You don’t have to go fifty feet from your house to find a photograph." And DiGiacomo is a great example of this. He is as adept at photographing the sports of the children in his town as he is shooting the action at a professional sporting event, or on the streets in NYC or at a wedding. While street photography can be accomplished on any street, New York City in particular is a place that lends itself to the art (after all, our sidewalks are 18% gray!). But street shooting does require a certain discipline. In this class, photographer Mel DiGiacomo discusses how to know the light, how to learn the vocabulary of your lenses, and how to put aside the technical aspects and keep thinking to a minimum to keep your shooting instinctual. DiGiacomo looks for human behavior, whether on the street, in a classrom, or at a wedding, and follows the advice of Walker Evans: "Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You’re not here long." DiGiacomo will get you thinking in different ways to help stretch your photographic muscles.
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Posted 06/20/14
In his lecture, Harvey Stein shares aspects of a career that spans more than 40 years of consistent and impressive work in photography. He shows and discusses work from his newest book, Harlem Street Portraits,  published last October. In addition, he shows some images from his four other books, Parallels: A Look At Twins (1978), Artists Observed  (1986), Coney Island (1998), Movimento: Glimpses of Italian Street Life (2006), and Coney Island 40 Years. Stein also discusses ways of approaching publishers, and strategies for getting long-term projects into book form. Stein is well known for his strong, close-up and involving street photography, as well as his sensitive portraits of people from around the world. For him, photography is a way to learn about life, living, and self. “Mostly, I do long-term projects that are of personal interest. I photograph situations, people and places I don’t know and need to learn about. Photography is the most meaningful thing I could ever do. It is my way of saying, ‘I am here,’ and my way of sharing some of my life and understanding of the world with others.”
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