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75 Views
Posted 07/16/19
Whether you’re planning a street-photography trip in Tokyo, or a trek through the mountains in Patagonia, we discuss ways to plan your trip and how to visualize and prepare for the images you take on location. We also discuss how to anticipate action, position yourself for great photos (time of day, camera placement, etc.), and how to compose strong images by creating drama inside each frame. Katsuyoshi Tanaka’s extensive experience as an editorial photographer and travel workshop leader provides you with techniques you can use to create impactful photos just in time for your summer vacation.
110 Views
Posted 08/22/18
Mike Olbinski presents his inspirational story about taking a passion for storms and turning it into a photography business. He then follows that with some great, basic guidelines about photographing storms, lightning, and even some time-lapse tips thrown into the mix. We hope you enjoy the video, and invite you to view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at BandH.com.   
115 Views
Posted 07/28/18
If you are lucky enough (and talented enough) to have a long career in photography, over time your work takes you down many roads, and Mel DiGiacomo is one of those photographers. Whether he is shooting the US Open or a wedding, on assignment for top magazines, or doing self-assignments on the street in New York City or in his small town in New Jersey, Mel is one hard-working photographer whose ability to adapt to a wide variety of situations and come back with the pictures holds lessons for any aspiring photographer. Photographers are always looking for subjects, and in so doing, often choose the street. As Dorothy Norman said, ‘You don’t have to go fifty feet from your house to find a photograph.’ And Mel is a great example of this. Mel is a legend in street photography, and New York City in particular, has been his beat. It is a place that lends itself to the art (afterall, our sidewalks are 18% grey!) But recently, Mel has spent quite a bit of time in Los Angeles, and he shows his new work and talks about the differences between NYC and LA and how those differences inform his work. But street shooting does require a certain discipline. In this video, photographer Mel DiGiacomo discusses how to know the light, how to learn the vocabulary of your lenses, and how to put aside the technical aspects and keep thinking to a minimum to keep your shooting instinctual. Mel looks for human behavior, and follows the advice of Walker Evans, ’Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You’re not here long.’ Mel will get you thinking in different ways to help stretch your photography muscles. Mel DiGiacomo Photography https://meldigiacomo.photoshelter.com/
1711 Views
Posted 06/05/18
In this B&H Online video, New York City-based photographer Charles Chessler shares images from his ongoing project, "Agreeable Strangers," and talks about his approach to asking complete strangers for a street portrait. He discusses being present and in the moment with your subjects and, amidst the hubbub of everything happening on the street, getting your subjects to be present with you... getting them to "drop in." Chessler also discusses gear and settings, keeping in mind that the technology exists in service of humanity and the interaction. We hope you enjoy the video, and invite you to view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at BandH.com.
299 Views
Posted 12/20/17
It’s about making sure you are in the right place at the right time and knowing what to do when you get there. Australian documentary photographer and Leica Akademie Instructor Nick Rains shares his experiences of shooting fine travel images from his 30+ years of professional practice. Using his own photos as examples, Nick takes you beyond the technical detail of your camera and into what you really need to know to get memorable travel photos. Street photography, close ups, portraits, landscapes, lighting situations and getting consent are just a few of the many scenarios Nick covers, together with valuable information on how to achieve the best results from your equipment. Nick Rains Photography https://www.instagram.com/nickrains https://www.nickrains.com/
264 Views
Posted 11/08/17
Three years ago, L.A. based photographer Dotan Saguy started a casual street photography project in his hometown. Over time the project morphed into a rich photo documentary about the culture of Venice Beach and is about to be published as a monograph by one of the most prestigious German art book publishers: Kehrer Verlag (Martin Parr, Bruce Gilden, Saul Leiter). In this video, Dotan Saguy shows his street and documentary work while explaining how the project evolved over time and how he found a great publisher. There are great lessons here for anyone with an idea for a long term project, whether you haven’t started yet or are already in the middle of it. Dotan offers tips and inspiration to help you turn your project into a reality. Dotan Saguy Photography  http://bit.ly/Dotan_Saguy_VeniceBeach... https://www.instagram.com/dotansaguy/ http://www.dotansaguy.com/
43 Views
Posted 10/31/17
What is Street Photography? Cities lend themselves to street photography—in New York City, our sidewalks are even (very helpfully)18% gray! Street photography is also a very popular avenue for photographers, but like anything else, those who do it well make it look easy when it is anything but. As with every other aspect of photography, there are many things to consider when trying to construct and capture a great image. In his talk, Thorsten discusses all these aspects of street photography, showing examples of his own work. Whether you have been too timid to try it, or you are bold as brass, you’ll leave inspired to go out into the street, see new things, and come back with great photographs.
104 Views
Posted 07/09/17
It is true that travel can inspire, stimulating all your senses as you wander with your camera through new and exciting surroundings. But your ability to maintain your concentration amidst the sights, sounds and smells in exotic, often chaotic environments is one of the keys to coming away with strong images. Documentarian and Wanderer Steve Simon provides tips and techniques for the traveling photographer gleaned from adventures to more than 40 countries on six continents. From smart planning through efficient research to tips on choosing a location, booking and keeping costs down, Steve Simon talks about what to take with you and in which camera bag, airport tips, safety & security, staying healthy on the road and hiring a guide for a shortcut to great images. You’ll learn about strategies for photographing strangers in different cultures, ethics and model release issues as well as creating a sense of place and following the light. Steve will inspire you to tell your personal travel story by shooting landscapes, details, night scenes, food and even documenting travel itself. All this with tech tips to improve your response time and ideas for sharing your work in exciting and innovative ways.
428 Views
Posted 06/02/17
In this B&H Event Space video, photojournalist and documentary artist Natan Dvir discusses the creative process behind three award-winning projects he has completed, including “Belief,” “Coming Soon,” and “Platforms,” which is the culmination of three years of photographing around his adopted home, New York City. Topics covered include the process of conceptualizing ideas, researching your subject, the logistics of photographing street scenes in varying environments, editing, and seeing the project to completion.
37 Views
Posted 01/14/15
In this class, photographer Mel DiGiacomo discusses how to know the light, how to learn the vocabulary of your lenses, and how to put aside the technical aspects and keep thinking to a minimum to keep your shooting instinctually. DiGiacomo looks for human behavior, whether on the street, in a classroom, or at a wedding, and follows the advice of Walker Evans: “Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You're not here long.” DiGiacomo will get you thinking in different ways to help stretch your photography muscles.
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