Photography Education

0 Plays ·Posted
We split our time on this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast between one book and many books. In the first half of the show, we learn about an inspirational new book, Among Peers: The United States of Young Photographers, which profiles the work of student photographers from several workshop programs in the United States. We conclude the episode with
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Peter Hurley discusses his gear setup and camera settings for headshot photography. He offers advice about what to look for in a camera lens, as well as how to balance ISO, aperture, and shutter speed settings for optimal results. What gear and settings do you use for your own headshot photography? Engage us in conversation in the Comments, below. Want to learn more from Peter Hurley? Watch the rest of the episodes in this series:
by Todd Vorenkamp ·Posted
There are seven basic elements of photographic art: line, shape, form, texture, color, size, and depth. As a photographic artist, your knowledge and awareness of these different elements can be vital to the success of your composition and help convey the meaning of your photograph. Depth, one of the most compelling elements, is the topic of this final part in our Elements of a Photograph series. Photographs © Todd Vorenkamp
by Todd Vorenkamp ·Posted
There are seven basic elements of photographic art: line, shape, form, texture, color, size, and depth. As a photographic artist, your knowledge and awareness of these different elements can be vital to the success of your composition and help convey the meaning of your photograph. Size, the most elusive of these, is the topic of this sixth part of our Elements of a Photograph series. Photographs © Todd Vorenkamp
by Todd Vorenkamp ·Posted
There are seven basic elements of photographic art: line, shape, form, texture, color, size, and depth. As a photographic artist, your knowledge and awareness of these different elements can be vital to the success of your composition and help convey the meaning of your photograph. We will be adding a splash of color in this part of our Elements of a Photograph series. Photographs © Todd Vorenkamp Yellow… with a
by Todd Vorenkamp ·Posted
There are seven basic elements of photographic art: line, shape, form, texture, color, size, and depth. As a photographic artist, your knowledge and awareness of these different elements can be vital to the success of your composition and help convey the meaning of your photograph. In photography, texture can be felt with both the fingers (the print) and virtually (with the viewer's eye). Texture is the next part of our Elements of a Photograph series. Photographs © Todd Vorenkamp
by Todd Vorenkamp ·Posted
There are seven basic elements of photographic art: line, shape, form, texture, color, size, and depth. As a photographic artist, your knowledge and awareness of these different elements can be vital to the success of your composition and help convey the meaning of your photograph. What separates form from shape? Form takes shape from the two-dimensional and brings it into the three-dimensional. And, speaking of form, it is the next part of our Elements of a Photograph series. Photographs © Todd Vorenkamp
by Todd Vorenkamp ·Posted
There are seven basic elements of photographic art: line, shape, form, texture, color, size, and depth. As a photographic artist, your knowledge and awareness of these different elements can be vital to the success of your composition and help convey the meaning of your photograph. When a line, or more than one line, closes or connects, a shape is formed. This is the topic of this next part of our Elements of a Photograph series. Photographs © Todd Vorenkamp
by Todd Vorenkamp ·Posted
There are seven basic elements of photographic art: line, shape, form, texture, color, size, and depth. As a photographic artist, your knowledge and awareness of these different elements can be vital to the success of your composition and help convey the meaning of your photograph. Line, the most fundamental of these, is the topic of this first part of our Elements of a Photograph series. Photographs © Todd Vorenkamp
by Jill Waterman ·Posted
There is no better example of the inspirational saying, “If you can see it, you can be it,” than in the grassroots efforts of the community-based arts program Newburgh Community Photo Project (NCPP). Founded in 2017 by photographer, educator, and community activist Vincent Cianni, NCPP teaches photography and related media to an underserved population of Newburgh youth, with a goal to explore critical social justice issues directly related to participants’ lives and community. In our second story on notable youth photo programs, Cianni
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It is important to be reminded of the power of photography to educate and explore, and to be a vehicle of self-expression, even self-realization. Equally crucial—through process and through memory—photography’s ability to bring people together, to share and to collaborate, is vital. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome a photographer who has built her life’s work around this idea of education through creative collaboration. For more than forty years,
by Jill Waterman ·Posted
Photography is notable among the arts for its ability to make change in the world. This can take many forms, from documentation of hardship to inspire social change to the exploration of invisible realms, leading to scientific discovery. Equally relevant is the use of photography as a teaching tool, dedicated to building confidence and affecting change in the lives and ambitions of underserved youth. For the first in a series that reveals the dedication and effort at work behind the scenes within notable youth photography nonprofits, we spoke
by Allan Weitz ·Posted
If you ask the average photographer what a wide-angle lens is good for, the response will invariably be something along the lines of "they're good for photographing small rooms, large groups of people crammed into small rooms, and landscapes." Ask the average photographer what a telephoto lens is good for and the answer will be, "they bring distant things closer to you," or something along those lines. And normal lenses? They're for photographing… well… "normal things." As true as all of the above may be, if you view these truisms as
by Bjorn Petersen ·Posted
Despite much of the photography world being on pause right now, it’s also as good a time as ever to be honing your craft. Much in the same way an athlete trains for their particular discipline, photographers need to train, too, but likely not by lifting weights and working out. Think of it as mental strength training, or simply just practicing, acquiring inspiration, learning techniques, and spending more time with your work. Here are some tips on sparking some new creative impulses or ideas for improving your photography practice. Find
by Bjorn Petersen ·Posted
Despite photography taking mainly a digital form nowadays, there is still immense value in the tactile side of photography, especially in regard to teaching photography. With education being based more in the home at the moment, it can be the perfect time to introduce someone to photography using the simplest and most basic tools. Pinholes are of the most primitive examples of photography but are also some of the most perfect tools with which to teach the basics of exposure without needing to complicate it using abstract modes, shutter speeds