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Posted 10/24/2019
Perhaps there is one thing on which all photographers can agree: we love to photograph our pets. From amateur to professional, a simple photo of our dog, cat, or guinea pig making “that face” is almost irresistible and, based on the current exhibit at The Museum of the Dog, this fascination with photographing our pets reaches into the past for as long as the medium has existed. On this week’s episode, we welcome author and vernacular photography collector Catherine Johnson, and Alan Fausel, Executive Director and CEO of the Museum of the Dog, to discuss the current exhibit on display at this museum. Johnson began collecting archival photos of dogs as a young girl, mostly from local flea markets, but over the years has amassed a unique collection of images—snapshots, posed portraits, cabinet cards, tintypes—dating back to the 1880s. This collection was made into the 2007 book, Dogs, and is now a wonderful exhibition at the Museum of the Dog, during the inaugural year in its new home, in Midtown Manhattan. With Johnson, we discuss the origin of her collection, the distinction between vernacular and amateur photography, and what makes for a good dog photo. We also touch upon her time working for photographer Norman Parkinson and her other photography work. Mr. Fausel, who has thirty years of art-world experience as a scholar, curator, appraiser, and regular guest on the Antiques Roadshow, now heads the Museum of the Dog, which is affiliated with the American Kennel Club. With Fausel, we speak about curating this exhibit, the challenges and joys of running a multi-faceted institution with such a specific theme, and how to balance the interests of dog lovers of varying stripes. We also discuss the growing interest in vernacular photography in the art world and its hard-to-be-determined appraisal value. Join us for this interesting episode and check out the “Photos: Please do not Bend, the Catherine Johnson Collection” on display through December 29, 2019, at the Museum of the Dog. Guests: Catherine Johnson and Alan Fausel © Catherine Johnson LLC © Catherine Johnson LLC © Catherine Johnson LLC © Catherine Johnson LLC © Catherine Johnson LLC © Catherine Johnson LLC © Catherine Johnson LLC © Catherine Johnson LLC © Catherine Johnson LLC © Catherine Johnson LLC, Image Courtesy AKC Museum of the Dog © Catherine Johnson LLC, Image Courtesy AKC Museum of the Dog Jason Tables and Catherine Johnson, © John Harris Alan Fausel © John Harris Allan Weitz, Catherine Johnson, and Alan Fausel © John Harris Allan and his “look-a-like” © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/22/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome editorial, fashion, art, and music photographer Olivia Bee. That’s a lot of tags and she’s earned them all in a relatively short time span. Her “origin story” is well-documented in photo circles, so we won’t go into that much, but in a career now a decade old, we discuss where those early successes have brought her, what she enjoys about photography, and what she is working on now. With clients that include Hermes, Nike, L’Oreal, Sony, and editorial assignments from Vice, Elle, the New York Times, and Complex Magazine, Bee has created a comprehensive body of commercial work while continuing to evolve the personal aesthetic that got her noticed in the first place. She is also now directing music and other videos and beginning a narrative film effort. We speak with Bee from her bucolic Oregon acreage and discuss a wide range of topics, from the evolution of her gear, including her current use of view cameras, to her self-portraiture techniques, to publishing her first book, Kids in Love, with Aperture. We also spend some time discussing her work with musicians, the different approaches to an editorial assignment with a musician, and working on album art or a portrait. Finally, Bee lets us in on her dream assignment and Allan promises to make that dream come true. Join us for this pleasant and informative conversation. Guest: Olivia Bee Lovers, 2013; from “Kids in Love” © Olivia Bee Baller, 2011; from “Kids in Love” © Olivia Bee Purple Haze, 2011; from “Enveloped in a Dream” © Olivia Bee from “Viva Las Vegas,” 2015 © Olivia Bee from “Viva Las Vegas,” 2015 © Olivia Bee Migos for Billboard, 2017 © Olivia Bee Kesha for Billboard, 2017 © Olivia Bee Larsen Thompson, 2016 © Olivia Bee Birdy for REDValentino SS16 Campaign © Olivia Bee Schiaparelli Couture © Olivia Bee Max and Opal (Barely Seventeen), 2016 © Olivia Bee Portrait of the American West, 2017 © Olivia Bee Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/12/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome collector, curator, author, and educator W.M. Hunt. Part of the incredible photography collection Hunt has acquired over the years is being auctioned by the famed Christies auction house, and Hunt joins us to chat about the genesis of his collection, that hard-to-define attraction to an image that inspires a purchase, and his hopes for the current sale. The collection that Hunt is selling is called “The Unseen Eye: Photos from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” and it includes photographs by Richard Avedon, Sally Mann, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Robert Mapplethorpe, Henri Cartier-Bresson—a veritable Who’s Who of photography of the 19th and 20th centuries. The collection was given its name because each of the photos has subjects whose eyes are obscured in some way, and we discuss why Hunt decided to collect such an eclectic group of images. Hunt is also an author and educator, and we discuss the numerous monographs he has written, how to “let a picture find you,” and the visceral difference between a good and a great photograph. Join us for this insightful and fun episode. Guest: W.M. Hunt Photograph © Duane Michals, from “The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” Courtesy of W.M. Hunt and Christies America © Duane Michals, from the “The Unseen Eye: Photos from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” Courtesy Christies America Diane Arbus, from the “The Unseen Eye: Photos from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” Courtesy Christies America Richard Avedon, from the “The Unseen Eye: Photos from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” Courtesy Christies America Henri Cartier-Bresson, from the “The Unseen Eye: Photos from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” Courtesy Christies America Sally Mann, from the “The Unseen Eye: Photos from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” Courtesy Christies America Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/11/2017
Structure and limitation is the key to the artistic process. This is the idea that opens our conversation with photographer and publisher Brooks Jensen. In addition to his work as a fine-art photographer, Jensen is well recognized as the publisher of LensWork, the beautiful print magazine (and website) about photographs (not cameras!). We speak with him about LensWork’s “Seeing in Sixes” competition, in which photographers submit a series of just six images with the idea that this limited number forces efficiency and creativity. Our discussion glides to other topics, such as the purpose of art, digital versus analog preservation, and the simple joy of creating and sharing your work. On the second half of our show we return for Episode Four of “Dispatch,” with Adriane Ohanesian. In this segment, Ohanesian talks about the cameras, lenses, and gear she uses in covering breaking and long-form news in Africa. She compares her newer Sony mirrorless to her Canon “tanks,” and offers insight on working in some of the toughest conditions imaginable. Ohanesian also continues to detail her assignment work and, on this occasion, she is in the Democratic Republic of the Congo with rangers combating illegal poaching and mining in the Okapi Wildlife Reserve. She tells of the region and its struggle for resources, and of the dangers, both natural and human, which confront locals and visitors. Chronicling her time with the rangers and her miles-long hikes through thick jungle, she shares thoughts on developing the photo narrative she hopes to relate with understated humor, and prepares us for the next chapter to this story, which ultimately turns quite tragic. Guests: Brooks Jensen and Adriane Ohanesian Previous Pause Next "Shoji – In Praise of Shadows," from Seeing in Sixes Brooks Jensen DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/17/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome Margit Erb and Michael Parillo, of the Saul Leiter Foundation, to discuss Saul Leiter’s career and their work preserving the art and the legacy of this pioneer of color photography. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Leiter veered from the traditional religious path his parents desired for him and moved to New York City to follow his own calling. Met with early success in the 1950s—Leiter’s photography was included in exhibits at MoMA and he built a steady career as a fashion photographer for Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar —by the 1980s, he was forced to give up his studio and struggled financially, but late in life his huge archive of color street photography, much of which was unseen beyond a few curators and colleagues, became a treasure chest of fine art photography. A painter and photographer, he left behind a tremendous amount of work, including hundreds of rolls of unprocessed film, that has been entrusted to Erb and the Leiter Foundation. We talk with Erb and Parillo about Leiter’s early life, his growth as a photographer, his shooting style, his work in fashion, and even how he turned down an invitation to be included in the legendary “Family of Man” exhibition at MoMA. After a break, we discuss the nuts and bolts of organizing and maintaining an archive that is at once massive and unwieldy and a never-ending source of inspiration. Join us for this fascinating conversation about a photographer whose complete body of work is yet to be fully appreciated. Guests: Margit Erb and Michael Parillo Photograph © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery Sunday Morning at the Cloisters, 1947 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Five and Dime, 1950 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery From Harper’s Bazaar, February, 1959 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Mirrors, 1962 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Red Curtain, 1956 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Red Umbrella, 1955 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Haircut, 1956 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Snow, 1970 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Untitled, 1950s © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Self-portrait, 1950s © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/04/2021
It’s hard to imagine a more ideal guest for a photography podcast than the wonderful Ralph Gibson. Gibson checks all the boxes—a straight-up master of the medium, a man of insights and tales, with a comprehensive understanding of photography from the nuts and bolts to the conceptual rigors. After training in the Navy, he assisted the great Dorothea Lange in the darkroom, but found his calling as an artist, staying true to his voice, and founding a publishing house for his seminal photo book, The Somnambulist, and those of many other artists, including Larry Clark, Mary Ellen Mark, and Duane Michals. On this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Gibson about Robert Frank and Dorothea Lange, about establishing a visual signature, “broken focus,” and of course, about his trusty Leica systems. We also touch on his relationship with musician and artist Lou Reed, 50mm versus 75mm lenses, deconstructing the tropes of photography, and the connections between music and photography. This was a conversation we wished could have continued for hours, and we suggest you consider one of Gibson’s bookmaking workshops or simply dig into his incredible body of work, perhaps starting with his latest book, Sacred Land: Israel Before and After Time. Join us for this wide-ranging and inspiring conversation, and as Gibson states, “I always believed that if I stayed true to my work, everything else would fall into place.” Guest: Ralph Gibson Photograph © Ralph Gibson From “The Somnambulist” © Ralph Gibson From “The Somnambulist” © Ralph Gibson “Elbow” © Ralph Gibson From “San Francisco” © Ralph Gibson “Self-portrait in VW, 1963” © Ralph Gibson Cover of “Sacred Land” © Ralph Gibson From “Sacred Land” © Ralph Gibson From “Sacred Land” © Ralph Gibson From “Sacred Land” © Ralph Gibson From “Sacred Land” © Ralph Gibson Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/05/2018
Under starry skies, we took our recorders and headphones to a collection of shipping containers in Brooklyn, known as Photoville 2018, and Photoville did not disappoint—what a wonderful collection of photo exhibits. The exhibits span the breadth of photography, but with an overarching theme rooted firmly in documentary and social justice photography. Many shows were sponsored—by the U.S. Marines, by magazines, universities, or collectives; others were curated by New York public-school children, and another by the New York Municipal Archives. As in years past, it was a wonderful, perspective-expanding experience, run by people who love photography. We chatted with organizers and photographers from a handful of the exhibitions. First on today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Michael Lorenzini, from the Municipal Archives of the NYC Department of Records. Lorenzini, along with co-curator Matthew Minor, organized the exhibit “NYC Work and Working,” a beautiful selection of images from the collection of the WPA Federal Writer's Project. In addition to discussing the current exhibition, Lorenzini offers details on the Municipal Archive itself, its mission, and the multitude of historical collections it houses. Staying in the New York groove, we met with the instructors and students from the High School of Art and Design and the High School of Fashion Industries. These photography programs, taught by Brenna McLaughlin and Ben Russell, respectively, have been a part of these high schools for decades and embrace traditional darkroom and digital techniques, offering work experience in photography, as well. The students were kind enough to wait for us to arrive after a long day of discussing their work with fellow students during New York Public School Day at Photoville. Next, we speak with Pablo Farias, Isaac Guzman, and Vanessa Crowley of the exhibit, "conSEQUENCIAS/conSEQUENCES" presented by Bats'i LAB. This exhibit and its organizers are invested in creating a photographic community, in Chiapas, Mexico, that can document their struggles and social movements. After a short break, we continue with photojournalist Ron Haviv and Dr. Lauren Walsh, of The VII Foundation exhibit. The focus of our chat is their upcoming film Biography of a Photo,  which traces the impact of two photographs Haviv took earlier in his career, which have left indelible marks on the countries in which they were taken. Both photographs capture isolated acts of cruelty within societies in conflict, and do so with such resonance that they have become iconic images within those societies. Our next stop is the container curated by the Authority Collective and their exhibit “The Lit List: 30 Under-the-Radar Photographers," a show presenting thirty interesting photographers whose work deserves attention. We speak with one of the photographers, Arlene Mejorada, and organizers of the Authority Collective, which is described as a group of gender non-conforming people of color reclaiming their authority in photography. Yes! Finally, we speak with Crista Dix of wall space creative, and artist Deborah Bay, about their exhibit, “Internal Ballistics.” The work here is more accurately categorized as “art” photography, but its beautiful cross-section depictions of bullets and the abstract damage they create fosters an interesting debate about gun violence. Join us for this interesting set of conversations. Guests: Ben Russell, Brenna McLaughlin, Erika Perez, Yaqueline Garcia-Hernandez, Sumona Islam, Tais Rivera, Michael Lorenzini, Pablo Farias, Isaac Guzman, Vanessa Crowley, Ron Haviv, Dr. Lauren Walsh, Arlene Mejorada, Mary Kang, Elaine Cromie, Deborah Bay, Crista Dix From “conSECUENCIAS/conSEQUENCES” © José Angel Rodríguez From “conSECUENCIAS/conSEQUENCES” © Maruch Santiz From “conSECUENCIAS/conSEQUENCES” © Tragameluz Collective “Biography of a Photo” © Ron Haviv, The VII Foundation From “NYC Work and Working” Courtesy of the New York City Municipal Archives From “NYC Work and Working” Courtesy of the New York City Municipal Archives From “The Lit List” © Arlene Mejorado “Internal Ballistics” exhibit Dr. Lauren Walsh and Ron Haviv “Telling a Story and Selling an Idea” exhibit Pablo Farias and Isaac Guzman at the “conSECUENCIAS/conSEQUENCES” exhibit Arlene Mejorado at “The Lit List” exhibit Crista Dix and Deborah Bay Photoville, 2018 Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/03/2019
As a companion to last week’s end-of-year review episode, and as a way of kicking off the new year, we will discuss our own photographic new year’s resolutions and gear wish lists on today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. As our most ardent listeners know, Allan, Jason, and I have wildly different photographic styles and our gear bags reflect those styles. We will start by talking about the photo-related goals that we each have for the coming year. Perhaps inspired by some of the guests we have had on the show this year, or our “What is Photography?” project, I have a couple of long-delayed projects to which I'd like to return, Jason is looking to continue his long-exposure work with urban cityscapes, and Allan is going to dig back into his film archive to digitize long-hidden gems. We will talk a bit about our current work and the techniques we want to improve this year and, after a short break, we will talk a bit about gear. Going around the table, we will discuss what we are currently shooting with and what new (or used) gear we may purchase to help us achieve our new year’s goals. Allan will start by describing the “Franken-slide copier” that he built with a Micro-NIKKOR 55mm lens, a Bolt Macro Light, and his trusty Sony a7R II. Jason is looking to experiment with long telephoto lenses, such as the Sony FE 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 GM OSS lens and a new 3 Legged Thing tripod, and I want to get back to my street photography roots with a fixed-lens camera such as the Fujifilm X100F or one of the Ricoh GR series cameras. While we do talk gear, this episode is mostly about our shared passions for photography and keeping creativity an important part of our 2019. What photography goals do you have for the coming year? Allan Weitz's "Franken-slide Copier" Beal's Island, Maine- 35mm slide image digitized by the "Franken-slide Copier" © Allan Weitz Beal's Island, Maine- 35mm slide image digitized by the "Franken-slide Copier" © Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/20/2018
On today’s show, we discuss a portrait and interview project that was created for B&H Explora, our online magazine and home base of the B&H Photography Podcast. The project is titled,  “What is Photography?” and, as the name suggests, we asked prominent members of the New York photo community—editors, artists, curators, technicians, and many photographers—for their definition of the medium. The responses are as varied as the individuals who participated, but it is the accompanying portraits, by photographer Cory Rice, that make this series so interesting. Using a simple combination of elements—an Oliphant backdrop, a Hasselblad medium format digital camera, and the north light of the Highlight Studios, at Penumbra Foundation—Rice created a stylistically uniform body of work that depicts his subjects with an honesty that reflects the community-building nature of the series and also hints at their unique relationship with photography. The subjects include Pulitzer-Prize-winning photographers, editors from the New York Times, curators from the International Center of Photography, Magnum Foundation fellows, and other leaders in their field. We talk with Rice about the conception and production of the series and intersperse excerpts from an artist’s panel with several of the participants. Toward the end of the episode, we speak with the winner of our recent Lumix Day Sweepstakes to see how his new DMC-GX85 Mirrorless camera with 12-32mm and 45-150mm lenses has advanced his photography. Join us for this interesting episode and check out “What is Photography?” on the Explora website. Guests: Cory Rice, Sam Cannon, Maciek Jasik, Miranda Barnes, and Stanley Steril Sam Cannon from the “What is Photography?” series © Cory Rice Elinor Carucci from the “What is Photography?” series © Cory Rice Lev Manovich from the “What is Photography?” series © Cory Rice Miranda Barnes from the “What is Photography?” series © Cory Rice Amr Alfiky from the “What is Photography?” series © Cory Rice Maciek Jasik from the “What is Photography?” series © Cory Rice Kelsey © Maciek Jasik Snow Canyon © Maciek Jasik © Sam Cannon © Sam Cannon From the series "Doubles" © Miranda Barnes From the series "MLK 50" © Miranda Barnes Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/10/2021
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we take a deep dive into the technical, legal, and even theoretical topics surrounding Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) and their growing place in the art and photography worlds. To take on this subject, we welcome cryptocurrency expert and past guest of the show, Drew Hinkes. Hinkes is an attorney and professor and, in 2017, was nominated as one of Coindesk’s Most Influential People in Blockchain. He is also co-founder and General Counsel of Athena Blockchain, a firm focused on tokenized investment products. We also welcome Derek Paul Jack Boyle and Mitra Saboury, who together make up the art collaborative Meatwreck. Meatwreck has recently minted and sold NFTs associated with its art and we ask Boyle and Saboury how the process worked and their general thoughts on NFTs in relation to community and their art work. In addition to clearing some of the murky waters surrounding NFTs, cryptocurrency, and smart contracts, this episode discusses the future of intellectual property and how the blockchain is changing the way we value, store, resell, and protect our copyrighted images. Join us for this in-depth and informative conversation. Guests: Drew Hinkes, Derek Paul Jack Boyle, Mitra Saboury Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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