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Posted 02/28/2018
As part of this week’s podcast, we spoke with our B&H correspondents attending the WPPI conference, in Las Vegas. Minutes after the camera was announced, we heard from Shawn Steiner about the new Sony Alpha A7 III Mirrorless Digital Camera. An avid Sony Alpha shooter, Steiner was able to provide us with details regarding the latest addition to the Sony full frame mirrorless lineup. For more of our recap from WPPI and on the latest gear announced at CES 2018, subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on iTunes or find this and all our episodes right here, on the B&H Explora blog. DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/04/2021
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome wedding and portrait photographer Kesha Lambert. We are excited to speak with Lambert about her approach to wedding photography on today’s show, but she is also speaking at the upcoming 4th annual Depth of Field Portrait, Wedding, and Event Photography Conference, which is a free virtual event to be held on March 7 – 8, 2021. The conference is hosted by B&H Photo and sponsored by Sony, Nikon, Canon, Godox, HP/NVIDIA, and others. The work of Kesha Lambert stands out for its ability to be both joyous and intimate. She deftly uses color and composition, as well as experience and intuition to tell unique and universal wedding day stories. Did I mention that Lambert is also a lawyer, mom to three boys, a member of the Wedding Photojournalist Association, and a Sony Artisan of Imagery? In our conversation, we discuss her business, intrapersonal, and photography skills to get a sense of how she runs her successful studio. Her website is a lesson in design and good business practices, and we discuss cameras and lenses, getting ahead of client expectations, contracts, and subjects as diverse as lighting kits and keeping large wedding parties focused and in frame. Join us for this insightful and enjoyable chat and register for Depth of Field 2021. Guest: Kesha Lambert Photograph © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 08/26/2021
Even if you are not currently on your beach vacation, let’s take a little trip to Hawaii’s shores for today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. Joining us is photographer Zak Noyle, who was born and raised in Hawaii and began publishing his surf photography while still in high school. Noyle has photographed the sport’s top surfers and events, has been published in Sports Illustrated and National Geographic, and has traveled the world for brands such as Billabong, Stussy, and Chanel. He also contracts commercial and editorial work (note our chat about photographing Michael Phelps) and has recently opened the Eleven17 Creative Agency. With Noyle we discuss how he started photographing simply to share his love for the ocean and surfing, but we learn that his father is a successful commercial photographer and we chat about the influence and support of family and friends. We also learn that Noyle was a state champion swimmer and how staying in top physical and mental shape is key to working in waves up to sixty feet high. We also discuss the techniques and gear he uses to work below and at the water’s surface, including the signature camera housing that he developed with Aquatech. In this pleasant and wide-ranging conversation, we get to understand how keeping a healthy balance between work and play can spark creativity and how preparation and experience lead to opportunity. Join us in “paradise.” Guest: Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 09/04/2019
We have been hosting the B&H Photography Podcast Panasonic LUMIX S1 Sweepstakes for the past several weeks and, today, we are excited to announce the winners of the LUMIX DC-S1 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 24-105mm lens and the LUMIX DC-G95 Mirrorless Camera with a 12-60mm lens. With that in mind, we’d like to thank all of our listeners who left ratings and reviews on Apple Podcasts, and particularly those who subscribed to the podcast and mentioned a favorite episode. This kind of feedback is well appreciated and helps us to develop the kind of episodes we hope you enjoy. Before we make that announcement, however, Allan, Jason, and I reflect on our “ photography New Year’s resolutions ” and discuss our personal photography projects from 2019 and the gear we have been using to make them happen. We start with Allan, who discusses his year-long process of culling his archive of images going back to 1969, including finding what he refers to as the very first “Allan Weitz photo.” He also explains how he uses his Sony Alpha a7R II Mirrorless Digital Camera as his “Franken-slide copier” and some of the gear that has impressed him this year, including the 7artisans Photoelectric 50mm f/1.1 lens and the Zeiss Batis 40mm f/2 CF lens, and his thoughts on the just-announced Leica M-E (Typ 240) Digital Rangefinder. John continues with a brief explanation of the resolutions on which he is procrastinating, and on his return to street photography and attempts to work with the FUJIFILM X100F Digital Camera, the Ricoh GR III, and the Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) Digital Rangefinder. Finally, Jason updates us on his telephoto cityscapes, his abstract portraiture, the Sony Clear Image Zoom function and whether or not he purchased the Sony FE 100-400mm f/4.5-56 GM OSS lens. Join us for this enjoyable chat and check out some of the previous episodes of the podcast which we mention during this conversation, including our talks with Jay Maisel and Stephen Wilkes, our discussion about hard drives, and our talk with landscape photographer Erin Babnik. © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz © Jason Tables © Jason Tables © Jason Tables © Jason Tables © John Harris © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/03/2018
Our B&H Photography Podcast FUJIFILM X-H1 Sweepstakes is still going strong and, in a nod to FUJIFILM, we speak with a few X-Photographers during our show but, in general, we break a bit from the norm and “interview” each other about our own affinity for taking pictures. Allan, Jason, and I each take a turn at describing what it is we love about photography. I tried to fashion the question to avoid the idea of “what do we love photographing?” or “what kind of photos do we like?” to concentrate on what it is about the act of photographing that gives us that sensation of joy, of satisfaction, of love. Yes, it’s hard to find the right words, but we do our best, and to help us out, we have asked three Fujifilm X photographers to add their thoughts to the subject. We speak first with street photographer (and podcaster)  Valérie Jardin, who riffs on “being in the zone” and the need to make every shot count. Then, we speak with  Bryan Minear, a Midwest-based freelance landscape and lifestyle photographer for whom image capture is just the beginning of his process, and, finally, we welcome Alaska-based adventure and travel photographer  Dan Bailey, who speaks on the satisfaction found in challenging yourself, whether in sports, music or photography. The work of each photographer is very distinctive and it’s interesting to hear their insights, not only on why they started and continue their love affair with photography, but also into their process and workflow. Join us for our version of a gabfest and don’t forget to  subscribe  to our podcast and enter to  win a FUJIFILM X-series camera. Guests: Valérie Jardin, Bryan Minear, and Dan Bailey New York City, 2016 © Valerie Jardin New York City, 2016 © Valerie Jardin Rome, 2016 © Valerie Jardin Paris, 2017 © Valerie Jardin © Dan Bailey © Dan Bailey © Dan Bailey © Dan Bailey © Bryan Minear © Bryan Minear © Bryan Minear Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/23/2020
For the headline of this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we lifted a line from our guest’s own Instagram bio. It would have been too easy to call a show with Walter Iooss Jr. “Sports Photography Legend” or some such, but that pigeonholes Iooss too easily, and does not recognize the scope of his engagement with photography and with the creative process. Yes, Walter Iooss Jr. is sports photography. He has more than 300 Sports Illustrated covers to his name, his first professional gig was at age 17, and for six decades he has photographed several Hall of Fames’s worth of athletes, including names like Arnold, Mary Lou, Muhammad, and Tiger, and his work with Michael Jordan is unparalleled. Also—every Super Bowl. But he has also photographed rock stars, models, fashion and commercial assignments, portraits, and documentary series. And he tells us of his love for music and that if not for a twist of fate, he might have been a musician. The man is a creator for life, a photographer for life. With Iooss, our conversation takes a leisurely approach, touching on a few of his more memorable photos and some of the interesting lesser knowns; the breadth of his work alone could keep us talking for hours. Along the way, we learn a little about his upbringing, the love for music, his mentors, and the time he shot for Atlantic Records. We discuss how he builds a composition, whether it be an action shot during a game or a complicated portrait setup. We also talk about using a giant Polaroid camera, the coming of autofocus, and Canon DSLRs. Join us for this pleasant conversation that is sure to interest not only fans of sports, but fans of photography. Guest: Walter Iooss Jr. Photograph © Walter Iooss Jr. Andy Samberg, 2011 © Walter Iooss Jr. Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier, 2003 © Walter Iooss Jr. Emmet Ashford, 1968 © Walter Iooss Jr. Tony Scott and Gary Templeton, 1979 © Walter Iooss Jr. Greg Louganis, 1984 © Walter Iooss Jr. Dave Parker and Grant Jackson, 1980 © Walter Iooss Jr. Jack Nicklaus, 1967 © Walter Iooss Jr. The Blue Dunk, Michael Jordan, 1987 © Walter Iooss Jr. The Corner, Havana, Cuba, 1999 © Walter Iooss Jr. Leipzig, East Germany, 1976 © Walter Iooss Jr. Lee Trevino, 1991 © Walter Iooss Jr. Willis Reed, 1973 © Walter Iooss Jr. Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/07/2019
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome a true photography legend—curator, critic, and author, Vince Aletti. Anyone who lived in New York in the 1980s and ’90s, and is interested in photography, will know of Aletti as the photography critic at the Village Voice. He went on to review photo exhibitions at The New Yorker until 2016. He has also curated exhibitions at the International Center of Photography and White Columns gallery, and has authored many books, including his latest, Issues: A History of Photography in Fashion Magazines, which he joins us to discuss. In addition to his writing and curating, Aletti is a collector, and has created a collection of the most important issues of fashion magazines from the past 100 years. The book, Issues, employs that collection to offer a history of fashion photography as it was meant to be viewed—in magazines, and our conversation focuses on the context of the magazine as “the ideal delivery system” for the best photography of several generations. We discuss the beginning of fashion magazines and introduction of photography to that format and we spend time discussing the work of Richard Avedon, Irving Penn, and Steven Meisel by looking at issues of magazines for which they were the primary, if not sole, photographer. The production of these magazines— Harper’s Bazaar, Vogue Italia, The Face, for example—are mentioned, as are the creative directors, editors, and stylists, but the point of this enlightening conversation (and Aletti’s book) is how great photographers have used the specific format of the fashion magazine for their ground-breaking and ever-evolving images. Today also marks the beginning of the B&H Photography Podcast Panasonic LUMIX S1 Sweepstakes. Follow the above link for the rules and entry guidelines and you’ll have two chances to win a new Panasonic LUMIX DC-S1 Full-Frame Mirrorless digital camera with 24-105mm lens or a Panasonic LUMIX DC-G95 Mirrorless digital camera with 12-60mm lens. Also, look for the upcoming special episode of our podcast with Panasonic LUMIX Global Ambassador Shiv Verma. Guest: Vince Aletti Above photograph courtesy Vince Aletti and Phaidon Press “Harper’s Bazaar,” October 1934, Harry Meerson. Collection Vince Aletti. Courtesy Phaidon “Vogue,” June 1, 1940, Toni Frissell. Collection Vince Aletti, Courtesy Phaidon “French Vogue,” May 1939, Erwin Blumenfeld; from “Issues: A History of Photography in Fashion Magazines,” Vince Aletti, Courtesy Phaidon “British Vogue,” June 1947, cover: Irving Penn; spreads: Clifford Coffin; from “Issues: A History of Photography in Fashion Magazines,” Vince Aletti, Courtesy Phaidon “Fashion & Travel,” 1954, No. 1, 1955, No. 2, Bert Stern; from “Issues: A History of Photography in Fashion Magazines,” Vince Aletti, Courtesy Phaidon “The Face,” July 1980, Corinne Day; from “Issues: A History of Photography in Fashion Magazines,” Vince Aletti, Courtesy Phaidon “Issues: A History of Photography in Fashion Magazines,” by Vince Aletti, Publisher: Phaidon Vince Aletti on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/31/2018
Today, we discuss tennis photography from two distinct points of view. Our first guest is an independent photographer with twenty years of tennis photography experience to his credit and, later, we’re joined by representatives from Drawbridge Digital, the company that is present for all three weeks of the 2018 U.S. Open, creating and managing the still photography used on U.S. Open.org. and archived by the U.S.T.A. On the first half of the show, we welcome Chris Nicholson, a veteran of our podcast, and a multi-faceted photographer whose tennis work has been published in Wired, Men’s Health, Golf Digest, Tennis Magazine, and the New York Times. We speak with Nicholson about the opportunities available for freelancers and even amateurs to shoot tennis matches and high-profile players. We discuss techniques, settings, and gear that will make your job easier and your photos better. After a break, we are joined by photographer Jen Pottheiser, and Reid Kelley of Drawbridge Digital, and we explore their massive undertaking to photograph the U.S. Open for the host organization. They work with all facets of the U.S.T.A. to provide photography to the editors at usopen.org, to their social media outlets, their marketing partners, as well as provide image storage solutions so that the thousands of photos taken at the Open can be made available for future needs. We speak with Pottheiser and Kelley about managing the workflow of the almost thirty photographers and editors on staff during the Open, about the on- and off-court images they look for, the systems they use to edit and organize the photos, and how to maintain your creativity while shooting nothing but tennis for three weeks. Join us for this timely and interesting look behind the scenes at the 2018 U.S. Open Grand Slam Tournament. Guests: Chris Nicholson, Jen Pottheiser, Reid Kelley © Chris Nicholson © Chris Nicholson © Chris Nicholson © Chris Nicholson © Chris Nicholson © Chris Nicholson © Chris Nicholson The Drawbridge Digital Team at the 2018 U.S. Open. Courtesy Drawbridge Digital Arthur Ashe Kids Day performers at 2018 U.S. Open. Courtesy Drawbridge Digital Jen Pottheiser and Reid Kelley © John Harris Reid Kelley, Allan Weitz, and Jen Pottheiser © John Harris Chris Nicholson on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris The B&H Photography Podcast team at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Courtesy Jen Pottheiser Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/06/2019
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome photojournalist and sports photographer Nick Didlick to our show. Didlick has been a freelance shooter, a staff photographer, an agency photographer for Reuters and UPI and, while covering the world news, was nominated for two Pulitzer Prizes. He also is an accomplished videographer, editor, and producer, and has served as Photo Chief for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics and as Director of Photography at the Vancouver Sun, where he oversaw the staff change from film to digital photography. As a photographer, Didlick has always been ahead of the technological curve, willing to try new cameras and transmission systems and push existing technology to its limits. He joins us to discuss his technical evolution as a sports photographer and the features that he considers important to balance technological advances with age-old experience of craft. We ask Didlick to look back on his career and discuss important steps in the evolution of his kit, including autofocus features, compact lenses, telephoto extenders, remote control, wireless transmission and, of course, the development of digital photography. We also look ahead to improvements in metadata and artificial intelligence and his overarching philosophy that all advances should be embraced if they are needed to improve your workflow. Throughout the episode, Didlick pokes fun at my “old” DSLR technology in favor of his Sony Alpha a9 II Mirrorless camera but, in doing so, he underscores his point, that as photographers, the hardest part of advancing your skill set is “un-learning” what you considered fundamental and embrace the changes that can improve your photography. Join us for this rollicking and enjoyable episode. Guest: Nick Didlick Above Photograph © Nick Didlick Wayne Gretzky © Nick Didlick Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev © Nick Didlick Remnants of Pan Am Flight 103, Lockerbie, Scotland © Nick Didlick Tiger Woods © Nick Didlick 2019 NCAA Final Four © Nick Didlick Lindsey Vonn © Nick Didlick Rodeo © Nick Didlick Usain Bolt stumbles and falls during race © Nick Didlick IAAF World Athletics Championship, 2019 © Nick Didlick Venus Williams © Nick Didlick Sloane Stephens with U.S. Open trophy, 2018 ©Nick Didlick Aibo dogs from Sony © Nick Didlick Nick Didlick and Allan Weitz © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/15/2019
We are in the midst of our B&H Photography Podcast Panasonic LUMIX S1 Sweepstakes and encourage you to check the link to enter to win a Panasonic LUMIX DC-S1 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 24-105mm Lens or a Panasonic LUMIX DC-G95 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 12-60mm Lens. For today’s episode, we present encore conversations with photographers Sisse Brimberg and Xyza Cruz Bacani. Sisse Brimberg is a veteran adventure and travel photographer who has more than thirty stories for National Geographic to her credit. Much of her work is devoted to historical and cultural stories, but our chat focuses on the informal portraiture she does in the streets, marketplaces, and country roads around the world. Brimberg relates how she is always “seeing” photographs, how she interacts with her subjects, and how to know when a photograph is worth taking. We also discuss her late husband and shooting partner, NatGeo photographer Cotton Coulson, and how her approach to work has changed since his death. Xyza Cruz Bacani, a Magnum Foundation fellow currently covering the civil unrest in Hong Kong, started taking photography seriously while employed as a domestic worker there. Her street photography blossomed into a career as a documentary photographer and photojournalist covering immigration, social justice, and human rights issues, but she still devotes time to “street.” We discuss the differences between the two disciplines, as well as her techniques and cameras and lens choices. Bacani has recently published the incredible book, We Are Like Air, about her mother and other migrant workers in Hong Kong. Join us for this insightful episode and don’t forget to enter our sweepstakes and subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast. Guests: Sisse Brimberg and Xyza Cruz Bacani © Sisse Brimberg © Xyza Cruz Bacani “We Are Like Air” by Xyza Cruz Bacani Panasonic LUMIX S1 Mirrorless Digital Camera Panasonic LUMIX G95 Mirrorless Digital Camera Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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