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Posted 03/31/2017
This is one of our most informative and, dare I say, best episodes yet. We talk about emulsion-based and inkjet photographic paper, with an emphasis on inkjet papers. We are fortunate to be joined by two talented and articulate guests, photographer Robert Rodriguez Jr. and August Pross, Print Manager and co-owner of LTI-Lightside photographic lab, in New York City. In addition to his outstanding landscape photography, Rodriguez is an author with three books on photography to his credit. He leads a very popular workshop series and is an ambassador for Canson-Infinity paper products. LTI-Lightside is well-known for its professional photo services and as the custom printer for many acclaimed fine-art photographers. In this episode, we talk about the various types of paper available for printing at home and at a lab, and discuss the differences between paper from Fujifilm, Epson, Kodak, Hahnemuhle, Ilford, and others. Topics we touch upon are optical brighteners, outgassing, printing profiles, and Wilhelm Imaging Research, but the focus of our conversation often returns to the tactile nature of the print and the need to understand a photographic print as an entirely different concept than an image on a screen. In addition to the wonderful dialogue, stay tuned throughout the episode for a B&H Photography Podcast exclusive promo code for a discount on all Canson paper products. Also, be sure to visit our podcast homepage for all of our episodes and, while you are there, leave us a voice message on the SpeakPipe widget. Click on this link to subscribe to our show on iTunes. Guests: Robert Rodriguez Jr. and August Pross Robert Rodriguez, Allan Weitz, August Pross Previous Pause Next Robert Rodriguez Jr DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/28/2016
The B&H Photography Podcast was very fortunate to be invited to the 29th Eddie Adams Workshop this year. The annual workshop, officially sponsored by Nikon with support from B&H, is a unique and inspiring event, bringing together 100 young photographers with some of the world’s most recognized photojournalists and editors, including thirteen Pulitzer Prize winners, for four intense days of photographic presentation and collaboration. The team leaders and speakers are a who’s-who of the photojournalism community, and we took our opportunity to sit down with as many of them as we could for conversations that ranged from personal inspiration and technical innovation to the photographer-editor relationship and how to set a camera trap for mountain lions. In the weeks to come, we will present several of our “conversations from the barn,” thus named because we created an impromptu studio in the fabled barn on the Eddie Adams farm. Our first conversation joins Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer John H. White and photographer, artist, and educator Endia Beal. Mr. White could be considered the spiritual heart of the workshop and anyone who hears him speak will understand why. His work for Chicago’s daily newspapers dates back to the late 1960s, and he was on staff at the Chicago Sun-Times when he earned his Pulitzer. His work is well rounded, as any newspaper photographer’s should be, and covers events big and small, but it his depiction of Chicago’s African-American community that has garnered the most attention. We speak with him about his upbringing in North Carolina, his relationship with his subjects, including his friend Muhammad Ali, and the most important camera he has ever used. Endia Beal is an accomplished artist currently serving as Associate Professor of Art and the Director of the Diggs Gallery at Winston-Salem State University. Her early artistic work emerged from personal tragedy and called into question cultural and skin-color-based stereotypes in her hometown community. Her more recent work continues to pose questions, exploring the identity of minority women within the corporate space. Join us as we chat with these two remarkable people about their lives and work. Photograph above © John H. White Guests: Endia Beal and John H. White Photographs above © John H. White Alexus Kyandra and Shakiya Martinique Sabrina and Katrina Photographs from the series "Am I What You're Looking For?" © Endia Beal Endia Beal | Photograph © John H. White John H. White | Photograph © John Harris John White accepting award at the 29th Eddie Adams Workshop, October, 2016 | © John R. Harris   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/03/2016
The B&H Photography Podcast was very fortunate to be invited to the 29th Eddie Adams Workshop this year. The annual workshop, officially sponsored by Nikon, with support from B&H, is a unique and inspiring event, bringing together 100 young photographers with some of the world’s most recognized photojournalists and editors, including thirteen Pulitzer Prize winners, for four intense days of photographic presentation and collaboration. Tim Rasmussen, Director of Digital and Print Photography at ESPN, joined us for a chat in our improvised studio in the fabled barn on the Eddie Adams farm. Prior to ESPN, Rasmussen was the Assistant Managing Editor of Photography and Multimedia at the Denver Post and under his lead, their photo department earned three Pulitzer Prizes. Tim is also a member of the Board of Directors at the Eddie Adams Workshop and, in addition to having been a team leader, producer and editor at the workshop, he was a student in its very first year—1988. Our conversation with Rasmussen revolves around the workshop—how he came to attend the first-ever workshop, why it has become a breeding ground and “sanctuary” for two generations of talented photojournalists and, of course, around Eddie Adams himself. We also talk with Rasmussen about his own career, transition from photographer to editor, and how he ended up at ESPN. Within this relaxed conversation there is much to learn—about the threads of life and the nature of commitment, about the practice of photojournalism and, particularly for young photographers, about what an editor looks for when hiring a photographer. Photograph above © Tim Rasmussen Guest: Tim Rasmussen Eddie Adams. Photograph by ©Tim Rasmussen The Board of Directors of the Eddie Adams Workshop, 1992. Photo Courtesy Tim Rasmussen The first Black Team at the workshop recreates Joe Rosenthal’s famous Iwo Jima image with Rosenthal in attendance. Photo Courtesy Tim Rasmussen Gregory Heisler at the first ever Eddie Adams Workshop, 1988. Photo courtesy Tim Rasmussen From the 2016 Eddie Adams Workshop Photographer Carol Guzy preparing for her talk at the barn Photographer Adrees Latif with student at 11:30 Club portfolio review Tim Rasmussen editing student’s work Photographer Marco Grob during his talk in the barn Editor Jim Colton offers advice to a student Photographer Nick Ut running for “president” at the 2016 Eddie Adams Workshop Students check out each other’s work at 11:30 Club   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 04/28/2017
We start this week’s episode on a congenial note with Frank Meo, aka “ The PhotoCloser,” talking about what can be a very difficult aspect of photography for some—negotiating with clients and establishing a rate for your services. Meo, who has been a “rep” for many photographers, now concentrates on being a “collaborator.” His services include estimating and negotiating fees. Meo also speaks on the subject at many conferences and workshops, and he offers brainstorming sessions designed to empower, motivate, and inspire. On our show, he discusses business practices that will garner “clients for life,” and offers a few ideas on what you should consider when charging for your services. After a break, we take a dramatic turn and present the first segment of our serial, “Dispatch.” We begin this series with photojournalist Adriane Ohanesian, who introduces us to her work, discusses her life as a freelancer based in Nairobi, Kenya, and prepares us for her upcoming assignment in Somalia. Once a month, Ohanesian will offer us insight into the working life of a photographer in conflict zones. Since 2010, Adriane Ohanesian has covered crises in South Sudan, Darfur, and Somalia, and has been recognized as one of Magnum Photo’s top “30 under 30.” She has also received LensCulture’s Emerging Talent award. In 2016, she won a World Press Photo award for her work in Darfur, and the Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award. This year Ohanesian was selected as one of PDN’s 30 new and emerging photographers. Guests: Frank Meo and Adriane Ohanesian Kaltumo Rukow Gulie, age 29, holds the phone as Mohamed Abdi Bare, age 4, speaks to his mother Amina from Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya, January, 2017. Mohamed Abdi Bare, age 4, stares at the line of people inside the waiting area at the Department of Refugee Affairs office in Shauri Moyo, Nairobi, Kenya, January, 2017. Women and children shelter themselves from the rain at the Mahama Refugee Camp in Rwanda, May, 2015. The shelters of nearly 400 pastoralists families who have lost a majority of their livestock due to drought, have set up camp along the road in search of food and water in Uusgure, Puntland, northern Somalia, February, 2017. Members of the rebel group the Sudan Liberation Army (SLA-AW), ride on top of a pickup truck inside of their territory in North Darfur, Sudan, March, 2015. Chichia, age 10, recovers in a make-shift clinic where her right arm was amputated after the Sudanese government bombed her family’s home in Tabanya, South Kordofan, Sudan, May, 2016. The Meth Project Campaign, photograph by Ron Haviv. Image courtesy Frank Meo/The PhotoCloser Frank Meo and Allan Weitz © John R Harris Previous Pause Next Adriane Ohanesian unless otherwise noted DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/25/2017
I don’t think I’ve ever seen Allan Weitz as happy as he was during our recording of this episode and, if you are into vintage cameras, lenses, and all things film photography, just sit back and enjoy our conversation with Bellamy Hunt, aka the Japan Camera Hunter. The palpable enthusiasm between these two camera lovers cannot be feigned, and they talked like old friends about Nikon SP, Canon rangefinders, Hasselblads, and anything with a red dot. We also learn how an Englishman arrived in Japan, worked for a camera company, became a camera hunter, and eventually developed a business that not only sources vintage and rare cameras, but sells film, custom-paints cameras, and writes and shares his love for photography on his the “JCH” site. In addition to talking about cameras, we discuss the photography culture of Japan, camera shops of Tokyo, and the renaissance of film photography. Join us for this pleasurable conversation. Guest: Bellamy Hunt Custom-painted Canon 7 rangefinder camera with Canon 50mm f0.95 lens Hasselblad Gold-plated 50th Anniversary 503CX with Zeiss 80mm f/2.8 Planar T* lens Black Leica M2 with a Leicavit MP and a 35mm f/2 Summicron-M Black Leica MP 6 with 35mm f/1.4 Summilux-M (Hunt’s personal camera) Black Contax G2 with 16mm f/8 Zeiss Hologon T* Black Rollei 35S with 40mm f/2.8 Rollei-HFT lens and rolls of JCH Street Pan 400 film Allan Weitz and Bellamy Hunt Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/03/2019
This is a conversation we wanted to last another hour. Talking with intellectual property attorney (and accomplished photographer) David Deal about copyright protection and “fair use” in the Instagram era was such an easy education and pleasant conversation. We already ran long on this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, just scratching the surface of these topics, and we had to edit out a side conversation we had with Deal about his fascinating work regarding the estate of photographer Vivian Maier. We plan to release that insightful interview in the very near future, but our show today focuses specifically on Deal’s work in the Brammer v. Violent Hues Productions Case and, in general, on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, rampant copyright infringement, and the value of photography in our sharing and social media-centric culture. Above photograph © Russell Brammer We begin our conversation with an overview on the Brammer case, involving an image by photographer Russell Brammer, which had been found on Flickr, and used without his authorization and without financial compensation. After attempts to resolve the matter without litigation, Deal advanced their suit against the offending party who themselves lawyered up, setting the stage for a Federal District Court judgment and subsequent reversal by a Federal Appeals Court. Deal walks us through the twists and turns of the “fair use” arguments and hints at how this small infringement case may turn out to be a very big victory for photographers. After a break, we take up broad questions of intellectual property protection, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, the roles and responsibilities of social media platforms, and how we might right the ship, in terms of photographs being valued for the effort involved in their creation and photographers being rightly compensated. Deal also offers a few pieces of welcomed advice for photographers interested in protecting the value of their work. Join us for this very informative episode. Guest: David Deal Alan Greenspan © David Deal John Lewis © David Deal © David Deal © David Deal © David Deal © David Deal from the series “Prospects” © David Deal from the series “Prospects” © David Deal from the series “Prospects” © David Deal © David Deal © Russell Brammer Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/26/2019
Today’s conversations address the challenges photographers encounter when “real life”—children, family, economic changes, even personal tragedy—interrupt the work we would like to be doing, namely taking pictures, and how we find our way back to the form of creative expression we all desire. Above Photograph © @afueravida We welcome four photographers who have overcome challenges or who have found ways to incorporate their own life and lifestyle into their professional work. First, we speak with photographer Erin Babnik, who previously joined us to talk about the tech she uses in her landscape photography, but now tells of her recent brush with tragedy when her new home and studio was engulfed by the deadly 2018 Camp Wildfire, in Paradise, California. Next, we are joined by Sofia Aldinio and Colin Boyd, of AfueraVida.com, who have decided to take their business on the road, quite literally. Not wanting the typical white picket fence and two-car garage lifestyle, they are retrofitting an old fire department van and taking their two young children on an epic journey from Maine to Argentina, all along, photographing for clients who love their real-life family adventure content. After a break, we welcome National Geographic Explorer and Grantee Erika Skogg to discuss her project on Scandinavian-American culture. After years spent traveling the world with her camera, Skogg decided it was time to return to her Wisconsin hometown to live. It wasn’t long before she turned her documentarian’s eye to her own culture and heritage and created a beautiful series on the traditions she knows so well. Finally, we’ll be joined by Carissa Pelleteri, who has published two books on the people of Montauk, NY. “Car” is a Brooklyn native who, after years of vacationing in Montauk, began to notice the changes happening to her beloved getaway. Her books are visual records of the town’s transition from bucolic fishing village to an oft-crowded tourist destination at the eastern end of Long Island. Join us for this intriguing set of conversations, recorded at the 2019 OPTIC Photography Conference. Guests: Erin Babnik, Sofia Aldinio, Colin Boyd, Erika Skogg, and Car Pelleteri Arrow Dynamic © Erin Babnik Silver Lining © Erin Babnik Gold Rush © Erin Babnik High Sodium © Erin Babnik © Erika Skogg, project funded by the National Geographic Society © Erika Skogg, project funded by the National Geographic Society © Erika Skogg, project funded by the National Geographic Society © Erika Skogg, project funded by the National Geographic Society from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri © @afueravida © @afueravida © @afueravida © @afueravida Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/10/2017
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we discuss long-term documentary projects, particularly those that deal with immigration and social issues. Both of our guests are currently working on projects that span several years, and we talk about the commitment, the technique, the goals, and the gear that go into their work. Our first guest is Griselda San Martin, a Spanish photographer who has been telling stories of immigration, deportation, and the often-blurred lines of national identity. One of her series profiles Las Delfinas, a girl’s flag-football team from a high school, in Tijuana, Mexico. Her project on families who meet on both sides of the U.S.–Mexico border wall for weekly reunions centers on a deported man who sings through the wall to his daughter on the other side,  and her current four-year project profiles U.S. veterans being deported as a consequence of criminal convictions.  After a break, we speak with Salwan Georges, a staff photographer for the Detroit Free Press who, in addition to his daily assignments, is documenting the immigrant communities of Dearborn and Detroit, Michigan. This is a subject close to his heart—Georges came to the United States as a refugee, in 2004. With San Martin and Georges, we talk about the practical aspects of their work, from camera choices to raising funds to simply making time for the work. We also discuss communication, establishing trust with subjects and the inspiration and goals for their projects. Finally, because both photographers incorporate video into their work, we ask if there is a limit to what a still photo enables them to say. Guests: Griselda San Martin and Salwan Georges   Members of Las Delfinas football team practice near their school, in Rosarito, Mexico. Griselda San Martin   People meet weekly at the border wall in Tijuana, Mexico, to talk with family members on the other side of the wall. Griselda San Martin   Jose Marquez goes to Friendship Park, in Tijuana, once a month to catch up with his daughter and sing to her through the border wall. Griselda San Martin The Buteh family, refugees from war-torn Syria, drive to a hotel after their arrival at Detroit Metropolitan Airport, 2015. Salwan Georges Father and son, refugees from Syria, play on the balcony of their home in Dearborn, Michigan. Salwan Georges/Detroit Free Press   Shi’a Iraqis participate in Arba'een walk on Sunday, December 14, 2014, in Dearborn, Michigan. Salwan Georges A young Iraqi boy helps his father grill buffalo fish, one of the most popular fish entrees in Iraq, over a fire pit. Dearborn, Michigan. Salwan Georges   Nassour Yacoub with his younger brothers Seid Yacoub, (left), and Khatir Yacoub, near their home in Detroit. "There was no one to help us. As the older son, I had to help raise my siblings and take care of my mom. Life was hard," said Nassour. The two youngest sons are young enough to adapt, and are slowly becoming accustomed to their new home in inner-city Detroit. Salwan Georges/Detroit Free Press, 2014 An Iraqi immigrant photographed behind a local coffee shop, in Detroit, Michigan. Salwan Georges Salwan Georges and Griselda San Martin DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/22/2019
Adriane Ohanesian has been on the B&H Photography Podcast in the past and we are very excited to welcome her back to discuss her photojournalistic work in Africa. As many of our listeners will recall, Ohanesian contributed to our podcast throughout 2017 in a serial segment we called “ Dispatch,” in which she provided monthly reports on her freelance assignments covering conflict and climate change in Sudan and Somalia. She also narrated the story of a deadly attack she survived while covering a story on illegal mining in Congo. It was a harrowing and tragic account that demonstrates the lengths to which photojournalists will go to cover a story. On today’s episode, Ohanesian updates us on a few of the items we discussed in 2017, including the illegal mining story and her assignment on the last white male rhinoceros in existence, which has since died. She also talks about a recent assignment for National Geographic, covering illegal mining and deforestation in Madagascar, and her work back in Congo covering an Ebola outbreak. In addition, Ohanesian provides insight into her life as a freelance photojournalist, reflects on incorporating video and audio into her workflow to get important stories told, and offers tips on the gear she uses for her arduous and often very remote assignments. Adriane Ohanesian is a respected photojournalist living in Nairobi and covering news stories throughout East Africa. Her coverage of the civil war in South Sudan garnered her a 2016 World Press Photo Award and she is also the recipient of the 2016 Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award. Join us for this compelling and inspirational episode. Guest: Adriane Ohanesian Marcellina, (center), who survived the militia attack, stands at attention over the grave of her colleague, Antopo Selemani, during the funeral of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve rangers outside of the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 17, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian Okapi Wildlife Reserve park rangers help to lower the body of their young porter, Lokana Tingiti, into the ground during the funeral of the rangers outside of the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 17, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian A woman cries over the grave of Léopold Ngbekusa during the funeral of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve rangers, outside of the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 17, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian Two men who were caught with eight diamonds, and who were mining inside of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve, were arrested and held by park rangers at their headquarters, in the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 12, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian Men shovel and pump water at the Bemainty sapphire mining site, inside of the Ankeniheny- Zahamena Corridor (CAZ), a protected area in Madagascar. Beginning in 2015, when the sapphire rush was first underway, this section quickly became a threat to the rain forest’s flora and fauna, July 29, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Diego Salimoali, age 37, stands with a pet brown lemur as he watches men work in the largest sapphire mining site in Bemainty, July 29, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Laurence Asma, age 41, shows off sapphires that she, her husband, and team of about twenty workers found in the largest mining site in Bemainty, inside of the Ankeniheny- Zahamena Corridor (CAZ), a protected area in Madagascar, July 28, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Roki, a black-and-white ruffed lemur, and Bridola, a brown lemur, are kept as pets in the back of a restaurant and shop, in a community of artisanal gold and sapphire miners living in Ambodipaiso, inside of the Ankeniheny- Zahamena Corridor (CAZ), a protected area in Madagascar, July 29, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Healthcare workers pause for a photo as they finish dressing in their Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) at the beginning of the morning shift at the treatment center, in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic in North Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 5, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Ebola survivor and "Guardian of the Ill," Pamela Kiyangaliya, age 33, gets dressed in her Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) as she prepares to start her morning shift at the treatment center, in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic in North Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 5, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Ebola responders with an armed police escort run with one of two coffins to be buried at the cemetery, on a hill in Butembo, in North Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. The responders have been a frequent target in attacks by community members and militias, March 6, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal The cemetery where Pamela Kiyangaliya’s sister is buried with many others who died from Ebola, on a hill above Butembo, Democratic Republic of Congo. According to the World Health Organization, there have been 848 confirmed cases and 509 confirmed deaths in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, March 6, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/15/2020
Imagine the privilege of being present at the creation of one of the “wonders of the world,” and then imagine being asked to document the magnitude—and the details—of that creation. Our guest on today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast has just that privilege and that responsibility and, as he puts it, this telescope may “change the way we understand our universe.” Chris Gunn has been a NASA contract photographer for almost twenty years but, for the past ten, he has dedicated himself to the James Webb Space Telescope and documenting the construction and eventual launch of this spacecraft, which will replace the Hubble as NASA’s most powerful telescope. We speak with Gunn about all aspects of his job and, specifically, about the gorgeous medium format images he creates that are made available to the public. Gunn is responsible for documenting the construction process, which includes portraits of scientists, as well as macro shots of screws, and he relates how he has “taken the extra step” to evolve as a photographer, incorporating medium format photography and detailed setups. Gunn must be prepared to shoot any style of photo and he discusses his daily responsibilities, how his gear has evolved over time, the lighting he chooses, and his interaction with the hundreds and technicians and scientists he works with regularly. We also discuss marketing yourself as a photographer and the specific challenges that make his job like no other, including working in giant “clean rooms,” accepting that your work is immediately in the public domain, and incorporating the aesthetics from science-fiction films. Sitting in on this recording is our own member of the B&H Space Force, writer Todd Vorenkamp. Join us for this fascinating episode in which we learn about this incredible spacecraft and the work that goes into documenting its creation and check out our 2016 episode, in which we speak with the imaging scientists from the  Hubble Telescope mission. Guest: Chris Gunn Above photograph © Chris Gunn Chamber A Door © Chris Gunn/NASA Blanket Inspection © Chris Gunn/NASA Wings Deployed © Chris Gunn/NASA Lights Out Inspection © Chris Gunn/NASA Container Doors © Chris Gunn/NASA Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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