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Posted 12/08/2016
Continuing with our series of conversations from the Eddie Adams Workshop, we sit with National Geographic photographer Steve Winter to talk about his work and career, specifically regarding capturing images and telling the stories of the big cats of the world. Winter started his photojournalism career in the social documentary tradition and, working for the famed Black Star agency, fate (and fear) pushed him into the world of wildlife photography. He tells us how his path shifted, how he blends photojournalism and wildlife photography and how specializing in one subject has benefitted his career. With many adventures and close calls under his belt, he relates how travel and gear logistics and long stretches away from home can be the hardest part of his job. He also talks gear choices, working with scientists and local trackers and drone photography. Winter’s work spans the globe and includes an ark full of creatures, but he is most recognized for his big-cat photography, which entails long expeditions in mountains and jungles and also the proficient use of camera traps to photograph elusive animals remotely, including the cougar known as P-22, which Winter photographed in its territory—the Hollywood hills.  Guest: Steve Winter All Photos © Steve Winter/ National Geographic A tiger peers at a camera trap it triggered while hunting in the early morning in the forests of northern Sumatra, Indonesia. 2009 With proper protection and enough prey tigers breed easily. This four year old tigress returned to the cave where she was born to have her first litter. Bandhavgarh National Park, India. 2011 A villager honors a slain elephant with incense and prayers, reflecting the Hindu belief that these pachyderms are sacred. This animal was illegally shot with a bullet soaked in acid while it was raiding a rice field near Kaziranga National Park, India. It died of its wounds a few days later. 2007 These men were apprehended while trying to sell a tiger skin near Chandrapur, India. Illegal trade in tiger bone, eyes, whiskers, penises, teeth and other parts for traditional Chinese medicine may generate up to five million dollars a year. Most poaching is done by local people trying to supplement their income. 2011 A leopard drinks at a waterhole where the caretaker of a local shrine lives with his livestock just outside Mumbai, India. 2014 Photographer Steve Winter sets up a camera trap on a beach in Yala National Park, Sri Lanka, in hopes of photographing a leopard that’s known to roam the beach in search of prey.   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/17/2017
For this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we replace the camera in our hand with a game controller, but if artistic interpretation of your surroundings is the goal, is there any difference between the two? Today, we talk gaming and photography and, specifically, the practice of in-game or virtual photography. While grabbing a screenshot of your high score is nothing new, using a gaming system’s increasingly advanced photo tools to capture images of the gaming world in which you are immersed is becoming a discipline unto itself. For sure, some gamers are still looking to show off their accomplishments and share them with fellow gamers, but others approach it as a landscape photographer, documentarian or combat photographer might, utilizing light and exposure controls to create dramatic images that showcase or even surpass those created by the game itself. We are joined today by our in-house gaming expert, Akeem Addy, as well as Tobias Andersson, Senior Producer of the Hunter: Call of the Wild, by Avalanche Studios, and two gamers who have explored in-game photography from distinctive perspectives, photographer Leo Sang and artist Eron Rauch. We also take time to talk a bit about the history of in-game photography and suggest games with some of the strongest photo tools. The debate about whether this is “real” photography will rage on. However, our guests are over that, not only creating beautiful and interesting photos, but elevating the dialogue to create images that question the relationship between the virtual and the “work-a-day” world. Join us for this multi-faceted episode and let us know your thoughts on gaming and photography—and even share with us your best images on Twitter @BHPhotoVideo with #BhPhotoPodcast. Guests: Akeem Addy, Tobias Andersson, Leo Sang, and Eron Rauch © Battlefield 1 Image by Leo Sang © Battlefield 1 Image by Leo Sang © Ghost Recon: Wildlands Image by Leo Sang © Grand Theft Auto V Image by Leo Sang Made with NVIDIA Ansel Image by Leo Sang From the series A Land to Die In by Eron Rauch From the Series A Land to Die In by Eron Rauch From the series A Land to Die In by Eron Rauch From the series Arcana by Eron Rauch From the series Valhalla Nocturnes by Eron Rauch © theHunter: Call of the Wild, courtesy Avalanche Studios © theHunter: Call of the Wild, courtesy Avalanche Studios © theHunter: Call of the Wild, courtesy Avalanche Studios © theHunter: Call of the Wild, courtesy Avalanche Studios Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 04/07/2017
Conservation photography can take many forms, and we will offer our definition, but more importantly, we will speak with noted outdoor photographer Art Wolfe about his definition of the term. After “Al’s Gearhead Pick of the Week,” we are joined by Mr. Wolfe for a segment in which we discuss how he produces beautiful images in the service of a greater cause. Wolfe is currently working on a project on African elephants and the critical need to safeguard their existence. From this topic, the conversation easily flows to the funding of expeditions through workshops and book deals to the work of other photographers promoting awareness on a global scale and photographers tackling local issues of concern to them. Above Photograph © Art Wolfe After a break, we are joined by David Brommer, director of OPTIC 2017-Outdoor, Photo/Video, Travel Imaging Conference, who will give us a preview of this year’s event, held June 4-7, in New York City. The theme of this year’s conference is conservation and the environment, so it is fitting that we pair him with Art Wolfe; however, the photographers who present at OPTIC represent a wide range of styles and concerns, and the topics discussed range from the aesthetic to the technical to the practical. Brommer provides us with a sense of the breadth of this photographic talent, as well as the manufacturers who will attend and festoon their booths with gear for everyone to try. Guests: Art Wolfe and David Brommer African Elephants, Savuti Marsh, Chobe National Park, Botswana: I was in a small boat as these elephants crossed the channel and hauled themselves out dark and slick with water. What I really like about this image is the implied African Elephants, Okavango Delta, Botswana: I set up by a shallow pond and was able to position the camera in a way to capture the width of the landscape Humpback Whale, Vava'u, Tonga: Tonga is one of the very few places you can actually snorkel within close proximity to whales. We had just five days on the water and four of them were just too windy and the whales were very shy. In a more outgoing moment, a whale swam by and eyeballed me. It was extraordinary. Puma, Torres del Paine National Park, Chile. African Elephant, Okavango Delta, Botswana: An African elephant's tusks are used for defense, digging for roots, stripping bark, and fighting during mating season. Previous Pause Next Art Wolfe DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/20/2017
This week, we took our mics and questions to Photoville, the free nine-day photography festival held in in the shadow of the beautiful Brooklyn Bridge. With exhibitions held in re-purposed shipping containers and on fences throughout the DUMBO neighborhood of Brooklyn, not only does Photoville offer a variety of incredible photography series, but it integrates seamlessly into its urban home. In its sixth year, Photoville Brooklyn has grown to include evening programming, lectures, panels, and workshops. Photoville, founded and run by United Photo Industries, has expanded to seven cities with plans for three more in 2018. The wealth of visual storytelling at Photoville is impressive—in our afternoon visit we saw exhibitions from every corner of the world, touching on the important issues of our day, and passing through all photographic genres. While there, we spoke with several photographers and curators about their work, as well as Photoville co-founder Laura Roumanos. Join our conversations with Daniella Zalcman of Women Photograph on their exhibition “Insider/Outsider,” with Sergeant John Martinez of the United States Marine Corps, about the series “ Battles Won,” and with the Director of Photography of The Player’s Tribune, Nate Gordon. We also speak with Rachel Dennis and Julie Winokur, of Talking Eyes Media, about their multimedia exhibit “Newest Americans,” organized in coordination with the Center for Migration and the Global City at Rutgers University, Newark, and the VII Photo Agency. Photography festivals and workshops are a gift to photographers and non-photographers alike. Join us as we find inspiration and motivation from the incredible image-makers found at Photovilleand, if you are in New York, check out all the exhibitions and activities yourself, from September 21-24, 2017. Guests: Laura Roumanos, Daniella Zalcman, Nate Gordon, Sgt. John Martinez, and Rachel Dennis Photoville Brooklyn, with Brooklyn Bridge and downtown New York across the East River All available space at Photoville is used to exhibit photography. Interior of container exhibit, “The Blood and the Rain,” by Yael Martinez and Orlando Velazquez Allan Weitz at Photoville; photographs in background by Lynn Johnson Allan Weitz, Laura Roumanos (Co-founder and Executive Producer of Photoville), and Jason Tables Container exhibit, “Battles Won,” from United States Marine Corps Sgt. John Martinez presents his photography in the exhibit, “Battles Won.” Container exhibit, “Battles Won,” from United States Marine Corps School children visit the exhibit, “Facing Change: Documenting Detroit.” From the exhibit, “Insider/Outsider,” photograph by Yagazie Emezi From the exhibit “Insider/Outsider,” photograph by Griselda San Martin From the exhibit, “Insider/Outsider,” photograph by Annie Tritt from her project, “Transcending Self” Nate Gordon (Director of Photography, “The Player’s Tribune”) with Allan Weitz and Jason Tables New York Liberty players, photograph by Annie Flanagan/The Players' Tribune Pop Warner Football, photograph by Walter Iooss Jr./The Players' Tribune Markelle Fultz pumping gas, photograph by Sam Maller/The Players' Tribune Ricardo Lockette, photograph by Taylor Baucom/The Players Tribune “The Family Imprint,” a photo series by Nancy Borowick, is displayed on a fence in the Brooklyn neighborhood of DUMBO, near Photoville. Allan Weitz and Jason Tables at Photoville Brooklyn Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/27/2017
Bird photography is a big deal around B&H, and we’re not just talking about the lenses needed to get those wonderful close-ups of warblers, herons, gulls, and raptors. Bird photography is a passion that grabs pros and amateurs alike and seems to not let go; there are very few photographers as dedicated to their craft (and gear) as bird photographers. We are fortunate to have two photographers with us to discuss the gear, technique, and protocols necessary to capture pleasing images of our feathered friends. David Speiser is a member of the Board of Directors of New York City Audubon and has been an avid bird photographer for more than twenty years. He has an incredible body of work that includes birds of all varieties, and brings not only technical excellence to his photographs, but a birder’s meticulousness to his archive. Klemens Gasser is a visual artist who became enthralled with birding several years ago and turned his fixation into an exhibit of bird photographs enlarged to 72 inches across. He brings an artist’s spirit to his bird photography and humor to our discussion, and clearly loves the thrill of the chase. We speak with these two photographers about the gear and apps they use, their shooting styles, favorite locations, and how digital technology has transformed bird photography. Join us for some very practical advice and a fun conversation. Guests: David Speiser and Klemens Gasser Baltimore oriole, photograph © David Speiser Blackburnian warbler, photograph © David Speiser Canada warbler, photograph © David Speiser Great gray owl, photograph © David Speiser Prairie warbler, photograph © David Speiser Red-shouldered hawk, photograph © David Speiser Red-tailed hawk, photograph © David Speiser Snowy owl, photograph © David Speiser Spruce grouse, photograph © David Speiser Upland sandpiper, photograph © David Speiser Common grackle, photograph © Klemens Gasser American bittern, photograph © Klemens Gasser Snowy owl I, photograph © Klemens Gasser Glaucous gull, photograph © Klemens Gasser Saltmarsh sparrow, photograph © Klemens Gasser Franklin’s gull, photograph © Klemens Gasser Painted bunting, photograph © Klemens Gasser Snowy owl II, photograph © Klemens Gasser Snowy owl III, photograph © Klemens Gasser Klemens Gasser, Allan Weitz, David Speiser, photograph © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/23/2018
We are delighted, at the B&H Photography Podcast, to present our chat with acclaimed portrait photographer Chris Buck. Buck is an in-demand celebrity and advertising photographer, but he also maintains ongoing personal projects, such as his current series, “Gentleman’s Club.” We speak with him on a range of topics, from concept development, shooting technique, and gear, to editing decisions and self-publishing. With a flexible yet unmistakable style that blends insight, a touch of dry, almost absurdist humor, and a pinch of the darkness within, Buck has photographed a host of luminaries from the worlds of film, music, and politics, including four of our last five Presidents. His most recent book, Uneasy, is a 30-year compendium of incredible portraits; we discuss the making of this book and, of course, some of his most recognized images. We also speak with Buck about process: his “three tiers of ideas,” thoughts on humor, his adjustment to digital photography, and DSLR versus medium format. In this wide-ranging conversation, Buck opines on his relationship with subjects, the nature of portraiture, his influences from pop culture and photography, and how “being relaxed and having fun are the enemies of a good Chris Buck photo.” Guest: Chris Buck Barack Obama, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Elvis Costello, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck George McGovern, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Leonard Cohen, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Philip Seymour Hoffman and John C. Reilly, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Steve Martin, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Steve Martin, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck William F. Buckley, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Jonathan Millet, from the "Gentleman’s Club" series © Chris Buck Vincent Rodriguez, from the "Gentleman’s Club" series © Chris Buck Chris Buck on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Allan Weitz and Chris Buck © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence
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Posted 03/16/2018
As Allan Weitz says in the introduction, when you see a Jeffrey Milstein photo, you know it. He has a distinctive style, which is not an easy accomplishment for an aerial photographer. But, of course, not all his images are taken from high above—he also has an incredible series shot from underneath airplanes. All kidding aside, Milstein’s work—aerial or otherwise—is infused with the complexity of observation and with the fascination of how similar forms repeat themselves in distinctive ways. On this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Jeff Milstein about his photography, with an emphasis on his aerial photography and the process, gear, and technique he uses to capture these stunning images. We discuss his previous career as an architect and the influence that carries into his work, the medium format and 35mm format digital camera he prefers, and his lens choices. Along with Weitz, who also has much aerial photography experience, we discuss using a gyro stabilizer and the advancements made in in-camera stabilization systems. We also chat about communication with pilots and how to plan a helicopter aerial shoot. Milstein also discusses the post-production techniques used to create his geometric compositions and the large format prints he makes, many of which are currently on exhibit at the Benrubi Gallery, in New York. Guest: Jeffrey Milstein Boeing 757-200, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Airbus A340-300, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Boeing 737-700, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Boeing 747-400, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Caribbean Princess, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Carnival Sensation, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Carnival Victory at Night, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein 5th Ave. Midtown, New York, NY, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Park La Brea, Los Angeles, CA, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Stuyvesant Town, New York, NY, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Coney Island, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Disneyland, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Gatwick Airport, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein LAX Airport, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Jeffrey Milstein, Photograph © John Harris Jeffrey Milstein and Allan Weitz, Photograph © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/20/2018
Anecdotes with insight are an important part of any good conversation, and we certainly heard some wonderful anecdotes from our guests at the OPTIC 2018 Conference. For today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we have cherry-picked a few stories from our conversations with Brian Smith, Seth Resnick, Vincent Versace, and Simon Lewis and have added a segment with Panasonic Marketing Manager Darin Pepple to round out the episode. Brian Smith is a Pulitzer-Prize-winning photographer most recognized for celebrity portraiture, but his work comfortably crosses all genres and his list of awards is impressive, including a World Press Photo Award. He is a Sony Artisan of Imagery, Profoto Legend of Light, Adobe Influencer, and X-Rite Master Coloratti. As a luxury lifestyle, destination, food, architecture, and interior photographer, Simon Lewis also understands that versatility is a crucial component to being a successful freelance photographer and, as his anecdote makes clear, some tenacity helps, too. His clients include Aman Resorts, Amazon, JetBlue, Ralph Lauren, Bon Appetit, Prada, and John Varvatos. Seth Resnick can do it all (I’m seeing a trend) and the graphic nature of his work and bold use of color and form make him in-demand across the editorial, travel, commercial, and fine art photography worlds. Chosen by Photo District News as one of the 30 most influential photographers of the decade, he was an original Canon “Explorer of Light,” consults for Adobe, X-Rite, and Epson, is an Ilford “Master” and is co-founder of D-65, a digital workflow consultancy. A few of our guests’ anecdotes were prompted by Allan Weitz’s “rabbit out of a hat” question but, with Vincent Versace, we were captivated and laughing too hard to even get to the question. Versace’s insight on photography comes from a range of disciplines and we learn how acting and some serious common sense influence his work. He is a Nikon Ambassador, recipient of the Smithsonian Award in Media Arts & Entertainment and his photography books, tutorials, and workshops are very popular. After a short break, we speak with Darin Pepple, Consumer Marketing Manager at Panasonic, about Lumix cameras, the evolution of the GH series, and the unique interaction between Lumix photographers and the product developers who continue to improve this innovative camera line. Guests: Brian Smith, Simon Lewis, Seth Resnick, Vincent Versace, and Darin Pepple Kelsey Grammer © Brian Smith Anne Hathaway © Brian Smith Taraji Henson © Brian Smith William H. Macy © Brian Smith © Seth Resnick © Seth Resnick © Seth Resnick © Seth Resnick from “Burma: The Last Page of the 19th Century” © Vincent Versace from “The Journey is the Destination” (India) © Vincent Versace Cuba © Vincent Versace Cuba © Vincent Versace © Simon Lewis © Simon Lewis © Simon Lewis © Simon Lewis Vincent Versace © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/15/2019
I think it’s fair to say that animals, even more than cars, sunsets, and children, are the most photographed subject by listeners of the B&H Photography Podcast and, on this week’s episode, we speak with two photographers who not only have dedicated their craft to photographing animals, but bring to their process a compassion and advocacy that goes far beyond just a pretty picture. Our first guest, Steve Morello, is recognized for his whale and polar bear photographs, but he is also a founding partner of Natural Habitat Adventures, a wildlife adventure organization dedicated to sustainable tourism and guide training programs in Peru, Tanzania, and the Canadian and American Arctic. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Alaska Whale Foundation, where he assists on research projects and is currently working together with tourism planners, scientists, and local fishermen to conserve a newly created marine sanctuary off the coast of Peru. Morello’s photos have appeared in National Geographic and The New York Times, and he is a major contributor to the photo collection of the World Wildlife Fund. After a short break, we welcome photographer Isa Leshko to discuss her series Allowed To Grow Old: Portraits of Elderly Animals from Farm Sanctuaries, which has been made into a gorgeous new book by University of Chicago Press. Photos from this series have appeared in The Atlantic, Harper’s, and The New York Times, and will be exhibited at the Richard Levy Gallery, in Albuquerque, and at ClampArt Gallery, in New York. Leshko provides insight into her process and workflow as it evolved over the eight years she worked on this project. Her dedication to process is clear as she explains how she hit upon this idea, why she chose certain animals to photograph, what cameras and gear she decided upon, and how the series developed into an advocacy project. She emphasizes her cognizance of the power dynamic in portrait photography and how respectful interaction for and even a form of collaboration with the animals was fundamental to create this type of portraiture. Join us. Guests: Isa Leshko and Steve Morello Above photograph © Steve Morello Book Cover of Allowed to Grow Old: Portraits of Elderly Animals from Farm Sanctuaries © Isa Leshko © Isa Leshko © Isa Leshko © Isa Leshko © Isa Leshko © Isa Leshko © Isa Leshko Isa Leshko © Ron Cowie © Steve Morello © Steve Morello © Steve Morello © Steve Morello © Steve Morello © Steve Morello Allan Weitz and Steve Morello © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/10/2019
This is “Wildlife Week” at B&H Explora and, for our contribution, we offer this most excellent episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. Truth is, serendipity is a goddess, and our B&H colleagues made it easy for us to bring you such great guests—the OPTIC Conference brought a bevy of incredible wildlife photographers to our microphones and our friends at Explora created this beautiful and educational feature, please check it out, here. Above photograph © Ron Magill First on today’s show is the one and only Ron Magill, photographer, Nikon Ambassador, and Communications Director of the Miami-Dade Zoological Park and Gardens. Magill brings his passion for wildlife and refreshing views on photography (and photographers) to this lively discussion. He also had some good news from his recent foray photographing the Monarch butterfly migration. Next, we are joined by polar expedition diver, photographer, podcaster, and founder of Meet the Ocean, the very talented Paul North. North is not only a doer of many good things, he is an incredibly nice man and talks of being under the polar ice in a way that might actually make someone consider going there! His intelligence and dedication is contagious as he discusses the simple quantity of life that exists in such remote, frigid places, and as he advocates for storytelling to “combat environmental apathy.” After a break, we welcome a master. This year’s keynote speaker at OPTIC,  Frans Lanting, joins us to offers thoughts on process, particularly the nuanced and well-researched approach he takes to an assignment before he ever picks up a camera. We talk a bit about specific projects but focus more on the importance of knowing the story you want to tell, eliminating preconceived images, and the need for a holistic method to making photographs of wildlife. Join us—it really was a treat to hear the thoughts of these three passionate professionals. Guests: Ron Magill, Paul North, and Frans Lanting © Ron Magill © Ron Magill © Ron Magill © Ron Magill © Ron Magill © Ron Magill © Frans Lanting © Frans Lanting © Frans Lanting © Frans Lanting © Frans Lanting Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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