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Posted 05/12/2017
A simple twist of fate (OK, I clicked a link) introduced me to the wedding photography of Jide Alakija and I immediately knew he should be a guest on the podcast. His work falls into the category of documentary wedding photography, but the intimate connection he seems to make with his subjects, as well as his compositional skills, place his work above the popular trend of fly-on-the-wall work. He captures moments of humor, tenderness, and joy that many photographers would miss, but still fills a frame the way Grandma wants the photos on her mantel to look. We talk about his composition decisions and shooting techniques, but we also wanted him on the show because his work brings him to many different countries and cultures. With this in mind, we take on numerous aspects of traveling to shoot a wedding, whether that is a "destination" wedding or simply being invited to shoot a wedding far from home. Our conversation includes the practical side of travel—what gear to bring, who to hire as an assistant, how to budget—but we also discuss the intricacies of working in a locale where you are not familiar with the cultural traditions and may not even speak the language. Join us for a lively chat with our new friend, Jide Alakija. Guest: Jide Alakija Jide Alakija and Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next All Photographs by Jide Alakija DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/23/2018
We are delighted, at the B&H Photography Podcast, to present our chat with acclaimed portrait photographer Chris Buck. Buck is an in-demand celebrity and advertising photographer, but he also maintains ongoing personal projects, such as his current series, “Gentleman’s Club.” We speak with him on a range of topics, from concept development, shooting technique, and gear, to editing decisions and self-publishing. With a flexible yet unmistakable style that blends insight, a touch of dry, almost absurdist humor, and a pinch of the darkness within, Buck has photographed a host of luminaries from the worlds of film, music, and politics, including four of our last five Presidents. His most recent book, Uneasy, is a 30-year compendium of incredible portraits; we discuss the making of this book and, of course, some of his most recognized images. We also speak with Buck about process: his “three tiers of ideas,” thoughts on humor, his adjustment to digital photography, and DSLR versus medium format. In this wide-ranging conversation, Buck opines on his relationship with subjects, the nature of portraiture, his influences from pop culture and photography, and how “being relaxed and having fun are the enemies of a good Chris Buck photo.” Guest: Chris Buck Barack Obama, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Elvis Costello, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck George McGovern, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Leonard Cohen, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Philip Seymour Hoffman and John C. Reilly, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Steve Martin, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Steve Martin, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck William F. Buckley, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Jonathan Millet, from the "Gentleman’s Club" series © Chris Buck Vincent Rodriguez, from the "Gentleman’s Club" series © Chris Buck Chris Buck on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Allan Weitz and Chris Buck © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence
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Posted 08/28/2019
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we present two conversations from the 2019 OPTIC Photography Conference. Both chats are with photographers who understand the value of sharing their experiences and skills with other photographers and embracing the idea that to be a teacher is also a path for learning. Our first conversation is with travel and landscape photographer Elia Locardi, who is also well known for his photography tutorials with Fstoppers, photo tours, and YouTube series on travel photography. With Locardi, we discuss the true value of travel photography and the connections to people and cultures that a camera can grant you. We also discuss how he balances his role as an educator with his personal photography. After a short break, we welcome photographer Alan Winslow to discuss his editorial and grant-funded photo projects, including a series in development that utilizes interactive technology and his own photography to inform viewers about threatened and endangered species. Winslow is also a FUJIFILM photographer who recently used the new GFX 100 Medium Format Mirrorless Camera to shoot “alternative” landscapes in Yosemite National Park, and we hear his impressions of this camera. In addition to his photography clients, which include the New York Times and Forbes magazine, Winslow teaches at the International Center of Photography, The Maine Media Workshop, and NYCSalt. Balancing one’s own photography practice with making a living as a photography educator is becoming an ever more common practice and, on today’s episode, we gain an understanding of the challenges and benefits of this approach. Join us. Guests: Elia Locardi and Alan Winslow Above Photograph © Alan Winslow  Yosemite National Park © Alan Winslow Yosemite National Park © Alan Winslow Yosemite National Park © Alan Winslow Yosemite National Park © Alan Winslow Mt Fuji, 2014 © Elia Locardi Mt Bromo, Indonesia, 2013 © Elia Locardi Tiger’s Nest Monastery, Bhutan, 2015 © Elia Locardi Hong Kong, 2016 © Elia Locardi Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/07/2019
“A wiser feller than myself once said, ‘Sometimes you eat the bear, and sometimes the bear, well, he eats you.’” A few of our listeners may recognize this quote from a certain 1998 movie but, for others, well, it may just be a confusing adage. For today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, however, we did indeed “eat the bear” and are very fortunate to welcome actor, musician, and photographer Jeff Bridges to our show. In addition to being an Academy Award-winning actor, Bridges photographs the “behind-the-scenes” making of his movies with a Widelux swing-lens panoramic film camera, and over the years has collected those images in private editions, made for the cast and crew. In 2003, he published a book called, Jeff Bridges: Pictures, and in October 2019, is releasing the incredible Jeff Bridges: Pictures Volume 2, which “expands on Bridges' intimate vision of Hollywood behind-the-scenes. Included within are rare looks at the famed actors, top directors, talented costumers, and makeup artists, skilled and creative set and art decoration, and the rest of the passionate crews involved in such memorable movies as True Grit, Crazy Heart, The Giver, TRON: Legacy, and Hell or High Water. ” With Bridges, we discuss his affinity for the Widelux, and how he handles this camera—known for its idiosyncrasies. We relate the nuts-and-bolts aspects of his workflow, from using the viewfinder (or not) to measuring exposure with a Minolta spot meter, to how he composes a frame with a 140-degree angle of view. We also discuss other wide-format cameras, how Bridges works on set with other actors and crew members, the creation of his new book, and the scope of his photographic work, which has become a unique documentation of movie-making from the 1980s until today. Join us for this lively conversation and look for Jeff Bridges: Pictures Volume 2, published by powerHouse Books and distributed by Penguin Random House. All of Bridge’s proceeds from the sale of his book go to the Motion Picture & Television Fund, a nonprofit organization that offers charitable care and support to film-industry workers. When you visit his website, check the link for No Kid Hungry, an organization dedicated to ending childhood hunger and for which Bridges is the national spokesperson. Finally, if you are in the Los Angeles area on October 15, take the opportunity to have Jeff sign your copy of his book at the Book Soup event, on Sunset Blvd. Guest: Jeff Bridges Above photograph © Jeff Bridges George Clooney, Tragedia/Comedia, "The Men Who Stare at Goats," 2009 © Jeff Bridges Iron Man Suit, "Iron Man," 2008 © Jeff Bridges Stan Winston’s Workshop, "Iron Man," 2008 © Jeff Bridges Stephen Bruton, Songwriter, "Crazy Heart," 2009 © Jeff Bridges Jack Nation, "Crazy Heart," 2009 © Jeff Bridges Gary Ross, Director, and Tobey Maguire, "Seabiscuit," 2003 © Jeff Bridges Claudio Miranda and Olivia Wilde, "Tron: Legacy," 2010 © Jeff Bridges Loyd Catlett, "Seventh Son," 2014 © Jeff Bridges "Scenes of the Crime," 2001 © Jeff Bridges Jodelle Ferland, Tragedia/Comedia, "Tideland," 2005 © Jeff Bridges Jeff Bridges, "True Grit," 2010 © Jeff Bridges Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/13/2019
With an exhibition of his 40-year photographic career opening at the Rubin Museum of Art, in New York, photojournalist and social justice activist Shahidul Alam was kind enough to join us on the B&H Photography Podcast to discuss the current exhibit, his career, and the state of photojournalism around the world. Also joining us is scholar, archivist, and the author of Conversations on Conflict Photography, Dr. Lauren Walsh. Truth to Power is the name of the Alam’s exhibition and it is “a tribute to the numerous acts of resistance all across the globe and gives hope to those who continue to believe that a better world is possible.” As the name indicates, Alam’s work confronts the injustices in his native Bangladesh, where he has spent a career photographing natural disasters, social inequalities, street protests, migrant workers, and investigating those murdered or kidnapped. He also founded the Chobi Mela Photography Festival and the Drik and Majority World photo agencies, which have enabled countless photographers a better chance to have their stories seen by a larger audience. In addition to learning about Alam’s career, his 2018 arrest, and his selection as one of Time magazine’s 2018 “Persons of the Year,” we discuss with Walsh and Alam many topics crucial to an understanding of modern photojournalism. We ask about how to shape a visual narrative for maximum effect, about the benefits of including graphic violence in an edit, and how journalists must protect themselves, not just from physical attacks, but from cyber and social media attacks. We also discuss the importance (and the dangers) of local journalists covering their own stories. Join us for this incredibly compelling episode. Guests: Shahidul Alam and Dr. Lauren Walsh Photograph © Shahidul Alam Dhaka Siege Day; Motijheel, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 1987 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy of Drik/Majority World Mural of Noor Hossain in Jahangirnagar University Campus; Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1987 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy of Drik/Majority World Bishwa Ijtema; Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1988 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Woman in Ballot Booth; Lamatia, Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1991 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Smriti Azad at Protest at Shaheed Minar; Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1994 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Airport Goodbye; Dhaka Airport, Bangladesh, 1996 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Climate Refugees; river crossing between Bondor Tila Ghat in Mijhum Dwip and Moktaria Bazar in Hatiya, Bangladesh, 2009 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Sailboat Fishing for Ilish; Daulatdia, Bangladesh, 2001 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Sheep at Sunset; Tibetan Plateau, 1999 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Rohingya Refugees After Having Just Landed in Bangladesh; Teknaf, Bangladesh, 2017 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Shahidul Alam © John Harris Dr. Lauren Walsh © John Harris Shahidul Alam speaks with Allan Weitz on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris John Harris, Allan Weitz, Shahidul Alam, and Lauren Walsh © Jason Tables “Shahidul Alam: Truth to Power” at Rubin Museum of Art © John Harris “Shahidul Alam: Truth to Power” at Rubin Museum of Art © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/24/2019
It’s hard to believe that another year of the B&H Photography Podcast is on the books and, as has become our way, we close out the year with a casual conversation about our most memorable episodes from 2019. But before we get started, a recent count showed that we have listeners in all but 15 countries. To us, that’s remarkable, and we’d like to offer a very heartfelt thank you and best wishes for a happy new year to all our listeners around the world. We look forward to your feedback and suggestions for photography conversations in 2020. Allan Weitz starts off today’s show with a few of his favorite 2019 episodes, including our talk with photographer Stephen Mallon, who documented the recovery of Flight 1549 —referred to as the “Miracle on the Hudson”—from the icy waters of the Hudson River after its forced landing in January 2009. On that episode, we welcomed Denise Lockie, a passenger on that flight. Allan also mentions our conversations with Albert Watson and Vince Aletti as favorites, and our chats on car photography with Nate Hassler and on D.I.Y. camera makers. For his part, Jason Tables starts his list with our episode on storm chasing and extreme-weather photography as a favorite. He also recalls “The Copyright Infringement Superhighway” with attorney David Deal, our talk with photographer Corinne May Botz on her series “Milk Factory,” and our hilarious and insightful conversation with portraitist Mark Mann. John Harris begins with some of the 2019 episodes that performed best in terms of number of downloads, some of which surprised us. He also discusses a few of his favorites episodes, including “Conflict Photography—Motivation and Consequence.” Other memorable episodes he mentions are “Commitment to Community—Rhynna Santos, Michael Young, and the Bronx Documentary Center,” our talks with rock photographer Mick Rock and photojournalist Shahidul Alam, and, of course, our conversation with actor and photographer Jeff Bridges. Enjoy our casual end-of-the-year chat, subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on Apple Podcasts, join our Facebook group, and have yourself a happy new year. Photographs © John Harris Allan Weitz, Denise Lockie, Stephen Mallon, 2019 © John Harris Rhynna Santos, 2019 © John Harris Michael Young, 2019 © John Harris Vince Aletti, 2019 © John Harris A.J. Bernstein, Allan Weitz, Orlando Mendez, Norman Blake, 2019 © John Harris Bill Shapiro, 2019 © John Harris Shahidul Alam, 2019 © John Harris Albert Watson, 2019 © John Harris Jeannette Garcia, Allan Weitz, and Yaakov Katz, 2019 © John Harris Santiago Lyon and Anthony Feinstein © Allan Weitz Mitra Saboury, Allan Weitz, Ben Zank, Cory Rice, 2019 © John Harris Petronella Lugemwa and Allan Weitz, 2019 © John Harris Liz Groeschen and Corinne May Botz, 2019 © John Harris Ron Haviv, Allan Weitz, and Dr. Lauren Walsh, 2019 © John Harris Allan Weitz, Monica Lozano, Stefan Falke, 2019 © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/05/2020
On the suggestion of a listener, we contacted a few Australian photographers to get their take on the devastating bushfire season that has burned more than 18 million hectares and taken thirty-four lives, since June 2019. We were fortunate to connect with Nick Moir, self-described storm-chaser, wildfire photographer, and current chief photographer at the Sydney Morning Herald. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Moir about his experiences photographing this year’s fires, as well as the overall news coverage of this disaster. Moir won a 2003 World Press Photographers Award for his coverage of that season’s bushfires, so he knows of what he speaks, and we talk with him about his approach to shooting such a dangerous subject, including planning, gear, safety measures, and the type of fire photos he prefers to make. We also discuss with Moir the fire season itself and why this year is so much worse than previous seasons. Finally, we talk about the news coverage of the fires and how his news organization covers the many stories that are part of this disaster, in comparison to how international journalists and news organizations cover the story. Before we speak with Moir, we welcome David Brommer, organizer of the 2020 Depth of Field Professional Portrait, Wedding, and Event Photography Conference, which takes place here in New York and streams online, on February 11 and 12. Join us for this timely conversation. Guests: Nick Moir and David Brommer Photograph © Nick Moir/Sydney Morning Herald Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/25/2020
What obstacles have gotten in the way of your photography? When life’s troubles arise, where do you point your camera? Or do you set it down? Photography can be a weekend hobby or it can be a life’s calling and, for our guests on today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, there is no doubt that photography is part of their very being, and meshed into the most intimate aspects of their lives. Adriane Ohanesian and Nancy Borowick have been friends since they studied together at the International Center of Photography, and have remained close despite careers that have put them on opposite sides of the globe. Both had specific aspirations while studying, both have received professional recognition as photographers, and both have faced tragedy and pain with a steady hand and unflinching eye. In addition to her many assignments for the likes of Time magazine and the New York Times, Borowick documented her parent’s parallel treatments for stage-four cancer. And as a photojournalist in East Africa, Ohanesian has covered war, refugee crisis, climate change, and illegal mining. Not only has she witnessed and documented extreme human brutality, she has been caught in the crossfire on more than one occasion. As part of B&H’s content for International Women’s Day, which is on March 8, 2020, we asked Borowick and Ohanesian to join us for a conversation about the role photography has played in their lives and to discuss their careers thus far. For both women, 2019 will be a watershed year—Borowick welcomed her first baby and Ohanesian survived a plane crash that has left her broken but unbowed. After a decade of “the hustle,” they also take a moment to gaze into the future of their photo careers and we are proud to be privy to this conversation and present it to our listeners. Join us for this real-world conversation among two accomplished photographers. Guests: Adriane Ohanesian and Nancy Borowick Adriane Ohanesian and Nancy Borowick at the International Center of Photography, in 2010. Photograph courtesy Nancy Borowick Allan Weitz, Adriane Ohanesian, and Nancy Borowick. Photograph © John Harris Hundreds of women and children who have fled the fighting and are seeking shelter from continued bombing by the Sudanese government's forces live in a cave, in Central Darfur, Sudan, March 2, 2015. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian A young boy looks over the Mahama Refugee Camp that currently houses more than 24,000 people who have fled from Burundi to Rwanda, May 14, 2015. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian Martha helps to bury her six-month-old daughter, in a mass grave for children in the cemetery across the road from the UN base in Bentiu, South Sudan, June 30, 2014. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian Healthcare workers pause for a photo as they finish dressing in their Personal Protective Equipment, at the beginning of the morning shift at the treatment center in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic, in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 5, 2019. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Ebola responders with an armed police escort run with one of two coffins to be buried at the cemetery on a hill in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 6, 2019. The responders have been a frequent target in attacks by community members and militias. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal From the “The Family Imprint.” Photograph © Nancy Borowick From the “The Family Imprint.” Photograph © Nancy Borowick From the “The Family Imprint.” Photograph © Nancy Borowick Senator Kristen Gillibrand and family. Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2013 From the “Single Ladies” series. Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2011 From the “Part of the Pack” series. Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2016 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2019 Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2020 Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/03/2020
Shari Belafonte knows cameras from both sides and she brings an understanding to the medium that is as palpable as her sense of humor. It was a pleasure to welcome her to the B&H Photography Podcast. Of course, we knew of Shari as the face from so many magazine covers in the 1980s and ’90s—no kidding, every other face at the check-out line melted away when you saw that smile. Of course, she has the same last name as a 20th-century legend (who just turned 93 this week, by the way), but did not use it at the beginning of her professional life. However, as her modeling career grew, so came television and movie roles, and she is currently a regular on the hit show, The Morning Show. Multi-talented? Yes, and we didn’t even talk about her singing voice, but what we didn’t know was that she went to school to work behind the camera and never really put it down, including stills and motion work over the years. First to admit her modeling career came as a bit of a surprise, Shari Belafonte did have her first professional shoot with none other than Richard Avedon, and that Calvin Klein campaign included a memorable early video component. In that period, she graced the cover of more than 300 magazines, including VOGUE, Jet, and Glamour. We speak with her about learning the modeling craft as she continued to learn the crafts of camera and lighting, working with the likes of Avedon and Francesco Scavullo. We also flash back a bit and talk about growing up the daughter of singer, actor, and civil-rights activist Harry Belafonte, discussing his Leica cameras, the role of photography in their household, dealing with the press and paparazzi, and a few of the famous shots of her father with his friend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Shari had her first camera at age four and generally spent high school and college in the darkroom before modeling and acting took over. Later, a well-timed gift of the then-new Canon EOS camera reignited her passion for making images and she continued, exhibiting several series of work over the years, shooting stills and BTS on films, even learning Steadi-Cam and “dp’ing” on music videos and shorts. We talk technique, interaction with talent, post-production, and about the power and beauty of creating a “moment in time.” Join us. Guest: Shari Belafonte From “MYTHOSTORIES,” Photograph © Shari Belafonte Delizia Danza, Photograph © Shari Belafonte Photograph © Shari Belafonte From “MYTHOSTORIES,” Photograph © Shari Belafonte Carl Cox, Photograph © Shari Belafonte From “MYTHOSTORIES,” Photograph © Shari Belafonte Photograph © Shari Belafonte Rush Hour in Havana, Photograph © Shari Belafonte Photograph © Shari Belafonte Photograph © Shari Belafonte Photograph © Shari Belafonte VOGUE cover, 1983. Courtesy Shari Belafonte Harry Belafonte and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Courtesy Shari Belafonte Allan Weitz and Shari Belafonte © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/17/2020
Today, we discuss some of the most recognized images of rock-n-roll history. Our first guest is photographer Amelia Davis, who is the owner of Jim Marshall LLC, the living archive of the prolific photographer Jim Marshall, most known for his images of jazz and rock musicians of the 1950s through the 1970s. If you are familiar with photos of Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Miles Davis, Johnny Cash, or the Allman Brothers Band, then you are certain to know his work. Marshall not only covered the Monterrey and Altamont festivals, but was the only photographer invited by the Beatles to photograph their final concert. Marshall also documented the Civil Rights movement and the Haight-Ashbury scene in San Francisco. With Davis, we discuss how she came to be the proprietor of the archive and how she protects and manages the collection. We also talk about Marshall, the man, and why he was seemingly able to photograph “everyone” in that era. Davis is also part of the production team behind the new film "Show Me the Picture: The Story of Jim Marshall,” which is well worth seeing to get a better understanding of Marshall’s motley personality and his incredible body of work. After our chat with Davis, we welcome photographer Elliott Landy, who is currently producing a book of his images on the seminal rock group, The Band. Landy was the official photographer of the famed Woodstock music festival and responsible for unforgettable images of Van Morrison and Bob Dylan, among others. Elliot is running a Kickstarter campaign to create Contacting the Band, which will take a deep dive into the thousands of photos he took of the group in concert and around their homes, in Woodstock, NY. We encourage you to check the Kickstarter link above and enjoy this episode. Guests: Amelia Davis and Elliott Landy Photograph © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Jimi Hendrix at Monterey Pop Festival, 1967 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Beatles coming onto the stage at Candlestick Park, San Francisco, for their last concert 1966 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Bob Dylan, New York City, 1963 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Johnny Cash at San Quentin Prison, 1969 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Janis Joplin and her 1964 Porsche 356 C Cabriolet, 1968 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Mick Jagger & Keith Richards, Exile on Main Street Studio Recordings,1972 Miles Davis, 1971 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Game arcade, San Francisco, 1962 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Mississippi, 1963 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Jim Marshall with Leica © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Elliott Landy with his photograph of The Band © Elliott Landy The Band, Woodstock, 1969 (album cover for “The Band” LP) © Elliott Landy “Contacting The Band” by Elliott Landy © Elliott Landy Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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