Don’t Miss an Episode Subscribe Now

Refine
Done
0 Plays
Posted 07/28/2017
On this month’s Gear Podcast, we take a look at wide-aperture, wide-angle lenses. With our guest, Neil Gershman, a lens expert from the B&H SuperStore, we touch upon the history of wide-angle lenses, their design and general applications, and then we discuss some pros and cons of wide-angle lenses with maximum apertures wider than f/2. Given the market demand and the technical capability, lens manufacturers have been introducing wide-angle prime and even zoom lenses with maximum apertures designed for better performance in low light and greater control of depth of field. We will discuss many of these newest lenses from Sigma, Nikon, and Canon and provide a run-down of all the fast aperture wide-angle lenses available from B&H. Join us for this educational episode. Guest: Neil Gershman Allan Weitz and Neil Gershman Click here if you missed our episode “Photographing the 2017 Solar Eclipse” DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 09/20/2017
This week, we took our mics and questions to Photoville, the free nine-day photography festival held in in the shadow of the beautiful Brooklyn Bridge. With exhibitions held in re-purposed shipping containers and on fences throughout the DUMBO neighborhood of Brooklyn, not only does Photoville offer a variety of incredible photography series, but it integrates seamlessly into its urban home. In its sixth year, Photoville Brooklyn has grown to include evening programming, lectures, panels, and workshops. Photoville, founded and run by United Photo Industries, has expanded to seven cities with plans for three more in 2018. The wealth of visual storytelling at Photoville is impressive—in our afternoon visit we saw exhibitions from every corner of the world, touching on the important issues of our day, and passing through all photographic genres. While there, we spoke with several photographers and curators about their work, as well as Photoville co-founder Laura Roumanos. Join our conversations with Daniella Zalcman of Women Photograph on their exhibition “Insider/Outsider,” with Sergeant John Martinez of the United States Marine Corps, about the series “ Battles Won,” and with the Director of Photography of The Player’s Tribune, Nate Gordon. We also speak with Rachel Dennis and Julie Winokur, of Talking Eyes Media, about their multimedia exhibit “Newest Americans,” organized in coordination with the Center for Migration and the Global City at Rutgers University, Newark, and the VII Photo Agency. Photography festivals and workshops are a gift to photographers and non-photographers alike. Join us as we find inspiration and motivation from the incredible image-makers found at Photovilleand, if you are in New York, check out all the exhibitions and activities yourself, from September 21-24, 2017. Guests: Laura Roumanos, Daniella Zalcman, Nate Gordon, Sgt. John Martinez, and Rachel Dennis Photoville Brooklyn, with Brooklyn Bridge and downtown New York across the East River All available space at Photoville is used to exhibit photography. Interior of container exhibit, “The Blood and the Rain,” by Yael Martinez and Orlando Velazquez Allan Weitz at Photoville; photographs in background by Lynn Johnson Allan Weitz, Laura Roumanos (Co-founder and Executive Producer of Photoville), and Jason Tables Container exhibit, “Battles Won,” from United States Marine Corps Sgt. John Martinez presents his photography in the exhibit, “Battles Won.” Container exhibit, “Battles Won,” from United States Marine Corps School children visit the exhibit, “Facing Change: Documenting Detroit.” From the exhibit, “Insider/Outsider,” photograph by Yagazie Emezi From the exhibit “Insider/Outsider,” photograph by Griselda San Martin From the exhibit, “Insider/Outsider,” photograph by Annie Tritt from her project, “Transcending Self” Nate Gordon (Director of Photography, “The Player’s Tribune”) with Allan Weitz and Jason Tables New York Liberty players, photograph by Annie Flanagan/The Players' Tribune Pop Warner Football, photograph by Walter Iooss Jr./The Players' Tribune Markelle Fultz pumping gas, photograph by Sam Maller/The Players' Tribune Ricardo Lockette, photograph by Taylor Baucom/The Players Tribune “The Family Imprint,” a photo series by Nancy Borowick, is displayed on a fence in the Brooklyn neighborhood of DUMBO, near Photoville. Allan Weitz and Jason Tables at Photoville Brooklyn Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 10/07/2019
“A wiser feller than myself once said, ‘Sometimes you eat the bear, and sometimes the bear, well, he eats you.’” A few of our listeners may recognize this quote from a certain 1998 movie but, for others, well, it may just be a confusing adage. For today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, however, we did indeed “eat the bear” and are very fortunate to welcome actor, musician, and photographer Jeff Bridges to our show. In addition to being an Academy Award-winning actor, Bridges photographs the “behind-the-scenes” making of his movies with a Widelux swing-lens panoramic film camera, and over the years has collected those images in private editions, made for the cast and crew. In 2003, he published a book called, Jeff Bridges: Pictures, and in October 2019, is releasing the incredible Jeff Bridges: Pictures Volume 2, which “expands on Bridges' intimate vision of Hollywood behind-the-scenes. Included within are rare looks at the famed actors, top directors, talented costumers, and makeup artists, skilled and creative set and art decoration, and the rest of the passionate crews involved in such memorable movies as True Grit, Crazy Heart, The Giver, TRON: Legacy, and Hell or High Water. ” With Bridges, we discuss his affinity for the Widelux, and how he handles this camera—known for its idiosyncrasies. We relate the nuts-and-bolts aspects of his workflow, from using the viewfinder (or not) to measuring exposure with a Minolta spot meter, to how he composes a frame with a 140-degree angle of view. We also discuss other wide-format cameras, how Bridges works on set with other actors and crew members, the creation of his new book, and the scope of his photographic work, which has become a unique documentation of movie-making from the 1980s until today. Join us for this lively conversation and look for Jeff Bridges: Pictures Volume 2, published by powerHouse Books and distributed by Penguin Random House. All of Bridge’s proceeds from the sale of his book go to the Motion Picture & Television Fund, a nonprofit organization that offers charitable care and support to film-industry workers. When you visit his website, check the link for No Kid Hungry, an organization dedicated to ending childhood hunger and for which Bridges is the national spokesperson. Finally, if you are in the Los Angeles area on October 15, take the opportunity to have Jeff sign your copy of his book at the Book Soup event, on Sunset Blvd. Guest: Jeff Bridges Above photograph © Jeff Bridges George Clooney, Tragedia/Comedia, "The Men Who Stare at Goats," 2009 © Jeff Bridges Iron Man Suit, "Iron Man," 2008 © Jeff Bridges Stan Winston’s Workshop, "Iron Man," 2008 © Jeff Bridges Stephen Bruton, Songwriter, "Crazy Heart," 2009 © Jeff Bridges Jack Nation, "Crazy Heart," 2009 © Jeff Bridges Gary Ross, Director, and Tobey Maguire, "Seabiscuit," 2003 © Jeff Bridges Claudio Miranda and Olivia Wilde, "Tron: Legacy," 2010 © Jeff Bridges Loyd Catlett, "Seventh Son," 2014 © Jeff Bridges "Scenes of the Crime," 2001 © Jeff Bridges Jodelle Ferland, Tragedia/Comedia, "Tideland," 2005 © Jeff Bridges Jeff Bridges, "True Grit," 2010 © Jeff Bridges Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 01/14/2021
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, photographer Matt Price describes skate photography as the “perfect blend between studio and sports photography” and, from our engaging conversation, this idea will be made clear. Price knows of what he speaks—in addition to an acclaimed freelance career, he has been a staff photographer and editor for The Skateboard Mag and is currently Brand Director at CCS Skateshop and creates the magazine, Golden Hours Skateboarding. Price has lost more than one lens to the rigors of his craft, and we talk with him about getting close to skateboarders with a fish-eye lens, as well as other shooting and lighting techniques. We also discuss how he fell in love with skating and, at a very young age, began to submit his work to forums and, ultimately, to editors. He admits to taking his lumps from online critics for his early work, but his passion for skating and desire to improve his photo craft provided the courage and commitment to keep going and, eventually, his “energy-based” photo style caught the eye of editors and brands who sent him around the world to cover the skate scene. We discuss many topics in this easygoing conversation, from skating techniques to the business of skateboard photography to the differences between the various skate publications. We also get into the relationship between skater and photographer and how such a niche photo style has grown to influence a range of disciplines. Finally, we talk about gear choices and what has worked for Price. Starting with a Canon Rebel that he purchased with money his grandmother helped him secure, Price has worked with Hasselblad and Sony systems, but is currently back where he started, shooting with a Canon EOS 5D Mark IV and the Canon EF 8-15mm f/4L lens. Guest: Matt Price Photographs © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 03/04/2021
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome wedding and portrait photographer Kesha Lambert. We are excited to speak with Lambert about her approach to wedding photography on today’s show, but she is also speaking at the upcoming 4th annual Depth of Field Portrait, Wedding, and Event Photography Conference, which is a free virtual event to be held on March 7 – 8, 2021. The conference is hosted by B&H Photo and sponsored by Sony, Nikon, Canon, Godox, HP/NVIDIA, and others. The work of Kesha Lambert stands out for its ability to be both joyous and intimate. She deftly uses color and composition, as well as experience and intuition to tell unique and universal wedding day stories. Did I mention that Lambert is also a lawyer, mom to three boys, a member of the Wedding Photojournalist Association, and a Sony Artisan of Imagery? In our conversation, we discuss her business, intrapersonal, and photography skills to get a sense of how she runs her successful studio. Her website is a lesson in design and good business practices, and we discuss cameras and lenses, getting ahead of client expectations, contracts, and subjects as diverse as lighting kits and keeping large wedding parties focused and in frame. Join us for this insightful and enjoyable chat and register for Depth of Field 2021. Guest: Kesha Lambert Photograph © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
0 Plays
Posted 07/29/2021
Photographer Sally Davies embodies a beautiful creative spirit, and I think that spirit also resides in the homes of the 72 New Yorkers she photographed, who are included in her wonderful portrait book, appropriately titled, New Yorkers. If this spirit does not exist and Davies is not in tune with it, how could she have captured such wonderful stories of people and their places and done it so efficiently, in some cases in just minutes? We answer that question and many others as we welcome Davies to the B&H Photography Podcast to discuss the making of her new book. We are also joined by writer and photographer Jill Waterman, who recently produced an insightful interview with Davies. Our conversation gets to the heart of Davies’ loving project, and touches upon its themes of inclusiveness and of gentrification, but also digs into the process of making portraits in cramped quarters with little time, and of the surprisingly difficult task of getting people not to smile for a photo. We talk about Davies’ decision to eschew light stands for on-camera flash and to go with a Sony mirrorless camera and Zeiss 18mm lens. We also talk about the importance of creative freedom and rejecting preconceived expectations as you make portraits. Davies photographed a wide range of New Yorkers for this series and did not refuse one person who was suggested to her, but when it came to organizing a book, edits needed to be made, and we discuss this process, as well. Davies is well-known for her street photography and we mention her projects on neighborhood storefronts and vintage cars, but this series of interior portraits is as “New York” as it comes. Join us for this pleasant conversation and check out Jill Waterman’s interview with Davies. Guests: Sally Davies and Jill Waterman Photograph © Sally Davies Cover of “New Yorkers” by Sally Davies Marina Press, from “New Yorkers” Photograph © Sally Davies Laurie Anderson, from “New Yorkers” Photograph © Sally Davies Rachid Alsataf, from “New Yorkers” Photograph © Sally Davies Vicky Roman, from “New Yorkers” Photograph © Sally Davies Danny Fields, from “New Yorkers” Photograph © Sally Davies Frances Pilot, from “New Yorkers” Photograph © Sally Davies Margo and Lois, from “New Yorkers” Photograph © Sally Davies Liz Adams, from “New Yorkers” Photograph © Sally Davies Flloyd NYC, from “New Yorkers” Photograph © Sally Davies Sally Davies, from “New Yorkers” Photograph © Sally Davies Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
0 Plays
Posted 08/12/2021
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome back an old friend of the show, photographer Mark Mann. Mann is known for a catalog of portrait work that includes celebrities, musicians, and politicians of the highest regard. In our previous episode with Mann, we discussed photographing Bill Murray, Jennifer Aniston, and President Obama, but like many of us, the COVID-19 pandemic and accompanying quarantine not only put a halt to our normal photo routines, but forced us to rethink how and why we make photographs. For Mann, this “rethinking” has brought forth a grand project that he created over the course of 2020 and takes dance―in all its many forms―as its subject. In this intimate and humorous conversation, we speak with Mann about reassessing his early career decisions, trying new techniques, and how he came to produce a series of portraits that included some of the most important contemporary dancers and legends of the art form. We discuss the cameras, lighting, and techniques that he utilized and how his normal approach to portraiture and even editing was set aside to create this series. We also speak with Mann about his other recent endeavor, the educational YouTube channel “Complicated Things,” which is designed to give photography enthusiasts insight into portrait technique and the “inner workings of the photo industry,” which Mann knows very well. Guest: Mark Mann Photograph © Cory Rice Mark Mann, 2019 Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C. Steiner
1 — 7 of 7 items

Close

Close

Close