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Posted 11/11/2015
Five years ago, you could buy a quality 35mm film camera for the song playing in your head. Used medium format film cameras collected dust on store shelves. Today, if a Mamiya, Hasselblad, or Rolleiflex become available, they don’t last long before being snatched up by a zealous photographer. And those who regularly shoot digital SLRs know that buying older models does not diminish the quality of your work, and it can save you hundreds of dollars, especially if you use them as roughly as some professionals do. Whether film or digital, the used camera market is alive and well and we will talk with photographer and camera collector Jason Wallace, and member of the B&H Used Department, Chris Koentje on what is new in used gear. From the cameras that are hot in Argentina, to what to inspect when buying a used lens, and to just how important trust is between buyer and seller, we will touch on all aspects of the used camera market in this spirited conversation between industry veterans. Guests: Jason Wallace and Chris Koentje To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. Jason Wallace Chris Koentje   Items from B&H Used Department Camera Museum b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 03/30/2016
The oft-quoted line paraphrased for our headline, and notably used in reference to Oskar Schindler and Chiune Sugihara, can also be applied to industrialist and Leica camera manufacturer Ernst Leitz II, who used his influence to help many Jews and other subjugated people avoid persecution, maintain their jobs, or even escape Germany during the 1930s and 1940s. Like any story drawn from a terrible era of oppression, heroes are painted with shades of gray, and humanitarianism can be found in small gestures, but historian Frank Dabba Smith creates a narrative derived from primary source research. Our other guest, photographer Jill Enfield, recounts her family’s direct relationship with this chapter of Jewish, German, American, and photographic history. Join us for this engaging conversation. Guests: Frank Dabba Smith and Jill Enfield To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. Frank Dabba Smith From the book, Ernst Leitz II- Ich entscheide hiermit: Es wird riskiert Jill Enfield, Frank Dabba Smith, and Allan Weitz Photos by Jill Enfield b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 07/14/2016
Are dance and photography natural enemies? Well, of course not, but one art form is about the still, captured moment, and the other about choreographed movement and fluidity. However, anyone who truly understands photography knows the importance of timing, grace, and harmony, and a dancer must also recognize the relevance of rest and static. Sculpture, or gesture perhaps, is their common bond and our two guests know well the significance of gesture and the conflicting and compatible characteristics of dance and photography. They join us to talk about their distinct work and shooting styles. Lois Greenfield is one of the recognized masters of the craft, having developed a singular style sought by the world’s most renowned dance companies, and Omar Z Robles, an official Fujifilm X-Photographer, brings a fresh take, blending aspects of documentary and street photography. Enjoy this episode as we discuss improvisation, inspiration, dodging taxis and, of course, lighting systems and camera and lens choices. Guests: Lois Greenfield and Omar Z. Robles   Photographs by ©  Lois Greenfield Photographs by ©  Omar Z. Robles   Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play           Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/29/2016
Digital video is a huge a part of “photography” now. There are almost no digital cameras introduced without some kind of video capability and, in some cases, “still” cameras are the go-to choice for professional videographers. Recently, we have seen 4K video top 1080 as the standard, and many camera lines, from DSLR to smartphone, are now providing 4K capability, but is this level of quality really warranted or even effective in a point-and-shoot camera? Today’s episode of the podcast will take on this question and, in so doing, we will discuss the particulars of 4K, including what camera models offer this high-definition quality, how do sensor size and form factor affect image quality, what peripherals are needed to make videos of a quality that merit 4K, and what’s the point of recording 4K if you can’t screen 4K? Join us as two B&H experts help clear the air regarding 4K video in still cameras.   Shawn Steiner, Allan Weitz, and Josh Pomponio Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play       b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/18/2016
While digital camera manufacturers are constantly looking for ways to improve and increase resolution, dynamic range, frame rate, ISO, and…everything, a very strong counter trend has emerged that is turning back to analog, mechanical, and film techniques.  Standing out amongst these “throwback” technologies is the rising popularity of instant film and instant film cameras. Fujifilm Instax has seen their sales soar but more interesting is the Impossible Project, who, in just a few years has become the go-to source for a wide variety of instant film and, recently, instant cameras, such as the new  I-1 Instant Film Camera. On todays’ episode we talk with Patrick Tobin from Impossible and photographer George Weiss, who incorporates instant film into his portrait and wedding work. We discuss how Impossible began by purchasing the last remaining Polaroid film factory, how they refurbish cameras for re-sale and how they continue to tweak their instant film chemistry.  Join us for an enlightening discussion on the intricacies of an upstart company that is finding success marketing “old” technology to new customers. Guests: Patrick Tobin and George Weiss         Photographs by George Weiss Impossible I-1 Instant Film Camera Impossible Instant Lab Universal Impossible Polaroid SX-70 Original Instant Film Camera Impossible Polaroid 600 Square Instant Camera   Patrick Tobin, Allan Weitz, and George Weiss Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play         Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/22/2016
Join us as we talk with two of our most regular and reliable guests about new cameras that were announced in 2016. We hesitate to use the phrase “best” cameras of the year because there a few cameras that we’re not all that crazy about, and a few we can only judge based on their announced specs, but there is plenty to talk about. Shawn Steiner and Levi Tenenbaum test and review cameras for the B&H Explora blog, and bring to this conversation not only extensive product knowledge, but a practical sense of which camera is right for specific photographers and applications. We discuss the new mirrorless medium format cameras announced by Fujifilm and Hasselblad, as well as several new DSLRs and mirrorless cameras, some the first from their respective manufacturers. We also mention a few favorite cameras sent in by listeners (see if you can tell which one we made up), talk industry trends and wrap up the show with a grab bag of favorite accessories. Guests: Levi Tenenbaum and Shawn Steiner Levi Tenenbaum, Shawn Steiner, Allan Weitz   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/08/2017
The title “The Falling Man” has been acknowledged as the name of the photograph of a man falling from the north tower of the World Trade Center during the attacks of September 11, 2001. The image depicts a lone figure falling headfirst against the backdrop of the vertical lines of the twin towers. As an image, it is a striking composition and the casual position of the man’s body bisecting the two towers, has even been described as graceful. These visual elements mask the horror of its immediate context and perhaps add to the upsetting response that often accompanies this image. Unlike other photographs from that day, this image does not explicitly depict carnage and destruction, but it is this image that has been often singled-out as too disturbing to view, too galling to publish. In fact, the image was published by many newspapers on the day following the attacks and was received with such recoil that editors were called to apologize for its inclusion and almost immediately, it fell under a shroud of obscurity, which in the sixteen years since 9/11, has been slowly lifted. On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome veteran Associated Press photojournalist Richard Drew who took this now iconic photograph. We talk with Drew about his experiences on September 11, 2001, about media self-censorship and about how this photo, which is simultaneously peaceful and deeply painful, had been received, rejected and perhaps now, accepted as part of the whole story and a symbol of all that was lost that day. Guest: Richard Drew Editor’s Note: We have decided to not use “The Falling Man” photograph in our blog post because of its painful depiction, but we feel the conversation we hold has educational, emotional and historical value, especially as we approach the sixteenth anniversary of 9/11. We produced it and present it with the utmost of respect for those whose lives has been affected by the attacks of September 11, 2001, particularly the survivors, the victims and their families, the first-responders and the journalists, who also risked their lives that horrible morning. Assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, Los Angeles, 1968. Photograph: Richard Drew Assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, Los Angeles, 1968. Photograph: Richard Drew Muhammad Ali watches as defending world champion George Foreman goes down to the canvas in the eighth round of their WBA/WBC championship match in Kinshasa, Zaire, on October 30, 1974. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Frank Sinatra escorts Jackie Onassis to the '21' Club on September 17, 1975 after she attended his concert at the Uris theater (AP Photo/Richard Drew) President Richard Nixon attends a baseball game at Yankee Stadium after his term in office (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Andy Warhol (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Texas billionaire Ross Perot laughs in response to reporters asking when he plans to formally enter the Presidential race. New York City, May 5, 1992 (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Britain’s Prince Charles, during a charity polo match in Mexico City’s Chapultepec Park. February 17, 1993 (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Cuban President Fidel Castro at a special commemorative meeting of the U.N. General Assembly, October 22, 1995. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Specialist Anthony Rinaldi is reflected in a screen at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, April 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Richard Drew at the B&H Photography Podcast. Photograph: John Harris Allan Weitz and Richard Drew. Photograph: John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/20/2017
This week, we took our mics and questions to Photoville, the free nine-day photography festival held in in the shadow of the beautiful Brooklyn Bridge. With exhibitions held in re-purposed shipping containers and on fences throughout the DUMBO neighborhood of Brooklyn, not only does Photoville offer a variety of incredible photography series, but it integrates seamlessly into its urban home. In its sixth year, Photoville Brooklyn has grown to include evening programming, lectures, panels, and workshops. Photoville, founded and run by United Photo Industries, has expanded to seven cities with plans for three more in 2018. The wealth of visual storytelling at Photoville is impressive—in our afternoon visit we saw exhibitions from every corner of the world, touching on the important issues of our day, and passing through all photographic genres. While there, we spoke with several photographers and curators about their work, as well as Photoville co-founder Laura Roumanos. Join our conversations with Daniella Zalcman of Women Photograph on their exhibition “Insider/Outsider,” with Sergeant John Martinez of the United States Marine Corps, about the series “ Battles Won,” and with the Director of Photography of The Player’s Tribune, Nate Gordon. We also speak with Rachel Dennis and Julie Winokur, of Talking Eyes Media, about their multimedia exhibit “Newest Americans,” organized in coordination with the Center for Migration and the Global City at Rutgers University, Newark, and the VII Photo Agency. Photography festivals and workshops are a gift to photographers and non-photographers alike. Join us as we find inspiration and motivation from the incredible image-makers found at Photovilleand, if you are in New York, check out all the exhibitions and activities yourself, from September 21-24, 2017. Guests: Laura Roumanos, Daniella Zalcman, Nate Gordon, Sgt. John Martinez, and Rachel Dennis Photoville Brooklyn, with Brooklyn Bridge and downtown New York across the East River All available space at Photoville is used to exhibit photography. Interior of container exhibit, “The Blood and the Rain,” by Yael Martinez and Orlando Velazquez Allan Weitz at Photoville; photographs in background by Lynn Johnson Allan Weitz, Laura Roumanos (Co-founder and Executive Producer of Photoville), and Jason Tables Container exhibit, “Battles Won,” from United States Marine Corps Sgt. John Martinez presents his photography in the exhibit, “Battles Won.” Container exhibit, “Battles Won,” from United States Marine Corps School children visit the exhibit, “Facing Change: Documenting Detroit.” From the exhibit, “Insider/Outsider,” photograph by Yagazie Emezi From the exhibit “Insider/Outsider,” photograph by Griselda San Martin From the exhibit, “Insider/Outsider,” photograph by Annie Tritt from her project, “Transcending Self” Nate Gordon (Director of Photography, “The Player’s Tribune”) with Allan Weitz and Jason Tables New York Liberty players, photograph by Annie Flanagan/The Players' Tribune Pop Warner Football, photograph by Walter Iooss Jr./The Players' Tribune Markelle Fultz pumping gas, photograph by Sam Maller/The Players' Tribune Ricardo Lockette, photograph by Taylor Baucom/The Players Tribune “The Family Imprint,” a photo series by Nancy Borowick, is displayed on a fence in the Brooklyn neighborhood of DUMBO, near Photoville. Allan Weitz and Jason Tables at Photoville Brooklyn Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/17/2017
We’re offering our annual end-of-year listicle of a podcast a bit early, but it comes with a good deal more information than usual. We polled the writers and experts at B&H to put together a set of cameras that represent the best or most important cameras released in 2017 and we welcomed Levi Tenenbaum and Yaakov Adler, two of our most knowledgeable staffers, to talk about the pros and cons of these cameras. To anyone paying attention to the photo industry, it should be none too surprising that new cameras from Nikon and Sony are competing for top honors, but you might be surprised at the rest of the cameras in our top ten list and at which point-and-shoot and medium format cameras come into play. Additionally, in the second half of the show, we offer statistics from the B&H website regarding the best-selling and the top-rated cameras of the year. These are not necessarily cameras announced in 2017, but we provide the top scores for cameras in all categories, as well as for lenses and accessories. Also, be sure to tune in next week for our companion episode on “Industry Trends for 2018!” Any podcast with Levi and Yaakov as guests is bound to be informative and entertaining, and this is no exception. Enjoy. Guests: Yaakov Adler and Levi Tenenbaum Levi Tenenbaum, Allan Weitz, and Yaakov Adler DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/08/2017
With the proliferation and improvement of cellphone cameras, even the idea of a stand-alone point-and-shoot camera is becoming obsolete. Or is it? Despite the inarguable decline in sales of the traditional point-and-shoot digital camera and its decreasing number on store shelves and in jacket pockets, there are still cameras defined as “point-and-shoot” that are solid sellers, and those that offer high-end features. As Allan Weitz points out on this episode, almost all cameras can be set to a “point-and-shoot” mode, but the compact digital cameras that made up the bulk of camera sales five years ago are now struggling to find a place in the market and the trend seems to be that they are diversifying their feature sets and finding niches in which to remain viable. For example, “tough” waterproof cameras and long zoom “bridge” cameras are selling well, and large sensor point-and-shoots like the Fujifilm X100F and the Sony RX100 series, are very popular. On today’s podcast, we welcome B&H expert and host of Lens Therapy Live on Instagram, Chris Williams, to the studio to talk about point-and-shoot cameras. We discuss which models are still selling and why, which features are appearing and which disappearing and the photographers to whom these features appeal. In the second half of the show, we go over exemplary cameras from each of the point-and-shoot categories and speculate on the future of this beloved camera type. Guest: Chris Williams Allan Weitz and Christopher Williams Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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