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Posted 03/10/2016
With the prevalence of “staff” photography jobs dwindling and the number of “photographers” increasing, finding regular freelance work and funding your own project is more complicated than ever. Yes, the tried-and-true rules of self-motivation and hustle are still the fundamentals, but today’s guests offer solutions to put photographers together with those who will support their work, regardless of the photographic discipline. Matt Craig, of blink, and Theresa Hubbard, of Fractured Atlas, discuss their organizations’ novel approaches and, together, we talk technology, content marketing, crowd sourcing, and what’s available in the new marketplace to monetize your photographic efforts. Guests: Matt Craig and Theresa Hubbard To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 03/23/2016
Has your wedding photography gone stale? Do your photos look just like everyone else’s? Perhaps you need to inject a little bit of you into your photography. Kristi Drago-Price knows wedding photography from all the angles—as a shooter, as an editor, and as a speaker and consultant. She joins us for a high-spirited chat, offering core ideas to improve your wedding photography. This episode is not about the latest gear or lighting techniques, but more, “how to get your game on”—how to get the most out of your style and build a client base that will grow with you. Thoughts on pre- and post-wedding communication, popular shooting styles, marketing, “eye-candy,” and getting published in wedding magazines will inspire you as the wedding season approaches.  Guest: Kristi Drago-Price To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS.   Photograph by Nakai Photography   Photograph by Amy Sims   Photograph by Kate McElweed   Photograph by Sarma & Co. Kristi Drago-Price at www.editors-edge.com   b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 03/31/2016
The B&H Photography Podcast has been streaming for almost six months now. We have had some incredible guests and have discussed aspects of photography, from gear to technique to art to finding work. We pride ourselves on our eclectic approach to photography and are pleased to present this episode, which offers a wonderful set of clips from some of our first 20 episodes. We’ve chosen segments that highlight our broad range and provide the heart of the very insightful and entertaining conversations we have hosted. We also added a few bloopers just for fun. This “sampler platter” offers talks on drones, the digital versus film experience, Leica history, night photography, the Museum of Modern Art, the best cameras of 2015, and the future of DSLRs. Sit back (unless you’re driving), enjoy, and thank you for making our show such the success that it has become.     To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. The Podcast team: John Harris, Allan Weitz, and Jason Tables   b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 05/26/2016
Wet-Collodion, Daguerreotype, Tintype, Calotype, Gum Bichromate, Van Dyke Brown. Oh my! On this week’s podcast, we welcome Geoffrey Berliner, Executive Director of the Penumbra Foundation, and photographer Jolene Lupo, to talk about alternative process photography. The Penumbra Foundation is an incredible organization, dedicated to the art, science, and history of photography and Berliner outlines their history and mission and the workshops and facilities they make available to all photographers, while Lupo discusses her tintype work at Penumbra and Spirit Photography. This episode is a true education, not just on the various alternative processes, but on the history of photography and on how learning the original pre-film processes will improve your digital photography. Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play. Photographs courtesy of Penumbra Foundation Tintypes and Albumen Silver Print by Jolene Lupo (including top shot) Photographs by John Harris b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 07/14/2016
Are dance and photography natural enemies? Well, of course not, but one art form is about the still, captured moment, and the other about choreographed movement and fluidity. However, anyone who truly understands photography knows the importance of timing, grace, and harmony, and a dancer must also recognize the relevance of rest and static. Sculpture, or gesture perhaps, is their common bond and our two guests know well the significance of gesture and the conflicting and compatible characteristics of dance and photography. They join us to talk about their distinct work and shooting styles. Lois Greenfield is one of the recognized masters of the craft, having developed a singular style sought by the world’s most renowned dance companies, and Omar Z Robles, an official Fujifilm X-Photographer, brings a fresh take, blending aspects of documentary and street photography. Enjoy this episode as we discuss improvisation, inspiration, dodging taxis and, of course, lighting systems and camera and lens choices. Guests: Lois Greenfield and Omar Z. Robles   Photographs by ©  Lois Greenfield Photographs by ©  Omar Z. Robles   Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play           Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/02/2016
In the first of our two-part series on astrophotography, we are fortunate to be joined by two scientists responsible for some of the most awe-inspiring images ever created. Astrophysicist Dr. Jeff Hester was a member of the team that built the camera on the Hubble Space Telescope and is credited with taking the “Pillars of Creation,” an extraordinary image of the Eagle Nebula that has been selected by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential photographs in history. Dr. Hester tells us about his time working on the Hubble and how this image was created, as well as offering his insight on the nature of beauty and the relationship between science and art (Hint: They’re not as different as you might think.) Also participating in our conversation is Zoltan Levay, the Imaging Team Leader at the Space Telescope Science Institute, whose principal responsibility is to produce and publicize pictures from the Hubble. Mr. Levay discusses the relative nature of color, his techniques for coloring and composing photographs, and the differences between the images that come to him as “data” from the telescope and the published images with which we are more familiar. Again, science and art blend as we ask why certain colors are chosen to represent various celestial bodies, and come to realize that the decisions made and processes used in the top tiers of astrophotography are not that different from those we ourselves make in our own post-processing. Guests: Zoltan Levay and Dr. Jeff Hester Next week’s episode, Shooting Stars, Part II- Deep Sky DIY The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the individual guests and do not necessarily represent the views of B&H Photo. Bubble Nebula NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) The “Pillars of Creation” from the Eagle Nebula NASA, ESA, STScI, J. Hester and P. Scowen (Arizona State University) Carina Nebula Mosaic NASA, ESA, N. Smith (University of California, Berkeley), and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Galaxy Cluster Abell 2744 NASA, ESA, and J. Lotz (STScI) Barred Spiral Galaxy NGC 1300 NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Image Processing Workflow Image Courtesy of Zoltan Levay and STScI Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play         Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/08/2016
In Part II of our series on astrophotography, we talk with Ian Norman, founder of Lonely Speck, a site dedicated to making astrophotography easy and accessible to all photographers. The website is loaded with great advice, gear reviews, and simple tutorials on how to photograph the night sky and specifically, the Milky Way. Our conversation with Ian centers on his development as a photographer and provides many tips on how, with very affordable equipment and apps and basic processing, you can create stunning dark sky images. As you will hear, Norman, like his website, is all about sharing experiences and advice on how to simplify and improve your photography. As he says, “there are few photographs that have as much existential impact as a nighttime landscape against the Milky Way.” Join us for this educational and inspirational episode. Guests: Ian Norman Photo: Ian Norman, LonelySpeck.com Last week's episode, Shooting Stars, Part I – Imaging from the Hubble Telescope Trona Pinnacles looking south with Milky Way Lone Pinnacle, Pinnacles National Park and Milky Way Eastern Sierras by moonlight and the Milky Way Milky Way and Alabama Hills Diana Southern and the Heavens Above Her Diana Southern, Allan Weitz, and Ian Norman Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play         Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/14/2016
Is your Leica M7 worth more than what you paid for it? How about the value of that Brownie in your grandfather’s closet, or even your first digital camera from 1995? With Heritage Auctions preparing to host its first-ever auction of collectible cameras, we take time to talk camera and lens collecting with Nigel Russel, of Heritage, and Gabriel Biderman, of B&H Photo. Russel is a world-recognized camera expert and photo historian, and discusses the criteria that make a camera retain or increase in value, the possibility of finding a collectible camera at a garage sale, and the general ins and outs of a camera auction. We also chat about Ansel Adams’s 4 x 5 camera that is currently up for auction, as well as the “cult” of Leica and even about a camera from the 1860s that uses water between the lenses to create a panoramic wide-angle view. A well-respected night photographer, Gabriel Biderman is also a camera collector whose first rule of collecting is to only acquire cameras with which he can actually take pictures. His collection includes cameras from each decade of the 20th Century, and he actively uses these film cameras, in addition to his growing list of digital cameras. Join us as we take on the subject of camera collecting from two distinct points of view and revel in the shared pleasure of classic photographica. Guests: Nigel Russel and Gabriel Biderman Ansel Adams's Arca-Swiss 4x5 View Camera used from 1964 to 1968 | Estimate: $70,000- $100,000 Ansel Adams's Arca-Swiss 4x5 View Camera Outfit used from 1964 to 1968 | Estimate: $70,000- $100,000 Willard D. Morgan's Leica IIIc Camera Outfit | Estimate: $10,000- $15,000 Reid III Type 1 Rangefinder Camera. English c. 1951 | Estimate: $1,500- $2,500 Kodak Ektra Rangefinder Camera Outfit- American, c. 1946 | Estimate: $1,200- $1,800 Kardon Signal Corps PH-629/UF Rangefinder Camera- American, Premier Instrument Corp. c. 1946 | Estimate: $1,500- $2,000 Leica I Camera- German, 1926/27 | Estimate: $1,500- $2,000 Nigel Russel, Allan Weitz, and Gabriel Biderman DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/28/2016
The B&H Photography Podcast was very fortunate to be invited to the 29th Eddie Adams Workshop this year. The annual workshop, officially sponsored by Nikon with support from B&H, is a unique and inspiring event, bringing together 100 young photographers with some of the world’s most recognized photojournalists and editors, including thirteen Pulitzer Prize winners, for four intense days of photographic presentation and collaboration. The team leaders and speakers are a who’s-who of the photojournalism community, and we took our opportunity to sit down with as many of them as we could for conversations that ranged from personal inspiration and technical innovation to the photographer-editor relationship and how to set a camera trap for mountain lions. In the weeks to come, we will present several of our “conversations from the barn,” thus named because we created an impromptu studio in the fabled barn on the Eddie Adams farm. Our first conversation joins Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer John H. White and photographer, artist, and educator Endia Beal. Mr. White could be considered the spiritual heart of the workshop and anyone who hears him speak will understand why. His work for Chicago’s daily newspapers dates back to the late 1960s, and he was on staff at the Chicago Sun-Times when he earned his Pulitzer. His work is well rounded, as any newspaper photographer’s should be, and covers events big and small, but it his depiction of Chicago’s African-American community that has garnered the most attention. We speak with him about his upbringing in North Carolina, his relationship with his subjects, including his friend Muhammad Ali, and the most important camera he has ever used. Endia Beal is an accomplished artist currently serving as Associate Professor of Art and the Director of the Diggs Gallery at Winston-Salem State University. Her early artistic work emerged from personal tragedy and called into question cultural and skin-color-based stereotypes in her hometown community. Her more recent work continues to pose questions, exploring the identity of minority women within the corporate space. Join us as we chat with these two remarkable people about their lives and work. Photograph above © John H. White Guests: Endia Beal and John H. White Photographs above © John H. White Alexus Kyandra and Shakiya Martinique Sabrina and Katrina Photographs from the series "Am I What You're Looking For?" © Endia Beal Endia Beal | Photograph © John H. White John H. White | Photograph © John Harris John White accepting award at the 29th Eddie Adams Workshop, October, 2016 | © John R. Harris   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/03/2016
The B&H Photography Podcast was very fortunate to be invited to the 29th Eddie Adams Workshop this year. The annual workshop, officially sponsored by Nikon, with support from B&H, is a unique and inspiring event, bringing together 100 young photographers with some of the world’s most recognized photojournalists and editors, including thirteen Pulitzer Prize winners, for four intense days of photographic presentation and collaboration. Tim Rasmussen, Director of Digital and Print Photography at ESPN, joined us for a chat in our improvised studio in the fabled barn on the Eddie Adams farm. Prior to ESPN, Rasmussen was the Assistant Managing Editor of Photography and Multimedia at the Denver Post and under his lead, their photo department earned three Pulitzer Prizes. Tim is also a member of the Board of Directors at the Eddie Adams Workshop and, in addition to having been a team leader, producer and editor at the workshop, he was a student in its very first year—1988. Our conversation with Rasmussen revolves around the workshop—how he came to attend the first-ever workshop, why it has become a breeding ground and “sanctuary” for two generations of talented photojournalists and, of course, around Eddie Adams himself. We also talk with Rasmussen about his own career, transition from photographer to editor, and how he ended up at ESPN. Within this relaxed conversation there is much to learn—about the threads of life and the nature of commitment, about the practice of photojournalism and, particularly for young photographers, about what an editor looks for when hiring a photographer. Photograph above © Tim Rasmussen Guest: Tim Rasmussen Eddie Adams. Photograph by ©Tim Rasmussen The Board of Directors of the Eddie Adams Workshop, 1992. Photo Courtesy Tim Rasmussen The first Black Team at the workshop recreates Joe Rosenthal’s famous Iwo Jima image with Rosenthal in attendance. Photo Courtesy Tim Rasmussen Gregory Heisler at the first ever Eddie Adams Workshop, 1988. Photo courtesy Tim Rasmussen From the 2016 Eddie Adams Workshop Photographer Carol Guzy preparing for her talk at the barn Photographer Adrees Latif with student at 11:30 Club portfolio review Tim Rasmussen editing student’s work Photographer Marco Grob during his talk in the barn Editor Jim Colton offers advice to a student Photographer Nick Ut running for “president” at the 2016 Eddie Adams Workshop Students check out each other’s work at 11:30 Club   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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