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Posted 07/21/2016
What will our future selfies be like? Our guest, Stephen Mayes, suggests that they may be images of what we think rather than what we see. For those of you exasperated by the deluge of duck faces in your social media feed, this may be a terrifying idea, but is the selfie really that bad, and if so, how and why is it different than an artist’s self-portrait? These are the questions we address in this week’s episode and, to do so, we have invited the inimitable Mr. Mayes and photographer Nicky Wanzi, whose recent series of self-portraits, in which she depicts not only herself but also two of her best friends, was included in PDN’s 2016 Photo Annual. Join us for this enjoyable conversation as we expose the selfie.   Guests: Nicky Wanzi and Stephen Mayes                   Photos by Nicky Wanzi Nicky Wanzi, Allan Weitz, and Stephen Mayes Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play       b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/15/2016
The iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus will be available on September 15, 2016, and we’ve organized an episode to celebrate iPhone photography, including a hands-on review of the new iPhone 7 Plus. Joining us are three photographers who bring unique perspectives to the imaging capabilities of the iPhone. First, we speak with Robin Robertis, a 2016 winner of the iPhone Photography Award and an artist for whom the iPhone provided a new creative tool for her ethereal and vibrant work. Next, we speak with Ed Kashi, a multi-faceted, veteran photojournalist and filmmaker who was one of five photographers assigned by Time magazine to document Hurricane Sandy with just an iPhone. Kashi also teaches workshops in iPhone photography for National Geographic, and will discuss how he incorporates mobile photography into his journalistic work. After a break, we speak with Brendan Ò Sè, a photographer from Cork, Ireland, whose playful image of the curved lines in Copenhagen’s Superkilen Park was chosen for the “Shot on iPhone 6” ad campaign. He'll talk with us about that experience and how the iPhone revived his love for photography. Finally, to put a bow on this episode, we sit with Olivier Laurent, editor of LightBox, at Time.com, to chat about his first impressions of the iPhone 7 Plus. Mr. Laurent was given the latest iPhone 7 before its official announcement to test and review its camera, and he shares his thoughts with us on the new features and specs. Guests: Robin Robertis- 02:00 Ed Kashi- 16:37 Brendan Ò Sè- 37:36 Olivier Laurent- 57:25 (iPhone 7 Review) Photographs above ©  Robin Robertis Photographs above ©  Ed Kashi Photographs above ©  Brendan Ò Sè Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play         Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/29/2016
In celebration of Gail Buckland ’s wonderful new book, Who Shot Sports: A Photographic History, 1843 to the Present, and the accompanying exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, we take a look at sports photography from all angles. With Buckland, we discuss the making of her book and the role that sports photography has played in the history and technology of photography. Buckland breaks apart false distinctions by including photographers as diverse as Andy Warhol, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Stanley Kubrick with legendary sports photographers such as Walter Iooss and Charles Conlon. Her research on individual photos and overall perspective on sports photography opens up the genre to the wide world of art, and her insights are invaluable. Also joining us is photographer Andrew Bernstein, well known as the long-time photographer for the Los Angeles Lakers. He has served as official photographer for the L.A. Clippers, Kings, and Dodgers, and held the position of Senior Director of NBA Photos. Bernstein has photographed a wide variety of sports and has published several books, including Journey to the Ring, documenting the 2009-10 Lakers championship season. His awards and accolades run deep and he was instrumental in developing the multiple camera Flash Wizard II system, which revolutionized indoor sports action photography through the use of triggers and remotes with strobe lighting. Bernstein discusses his career development, gear setups and shooting techniques, as well as his relationship with athletes, specifically with Kobe Bryant, whose photo is included in the book and exhibit, Who Shot Sports. Photograph above courtesy Tim Clayton Guests: Gail Buckland and Andrew Bernstein Andrew Bernstein Photos © Andrew D. Bernstein / NHLI / Getty Images © Andrew D. Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images © Andrew D. Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images © Andrew D. Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images © Andrew D. Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images Photos from Who Shot Sports: A Photographic History, 1843 to the Present George Demany- Chronophotograph – Copyright INSEP IconothEque Hill and Adamson – Courtesy Scottish National Portrait Gallery Jeorg Mitter – Courtsy Jeorg Mitter/Limex Images John Dominis – Courtesy John Dominis/Getty Images Mark Leech – Courtesy Mark Leech and Offside Sports Photography Lucy Nicholson – Alzheimer’s Ping Pong Therapy- Courtesy Lucy Nicholson/Reuters Bob Martin- Courtesy Bob Martin/Sports Illustrated Krystle Wright- Base Jumpers- Collection of Krystle Wright Courtesy Tim Clayton Gail Buckland, Allan Weitz, and Andrew Bernstein Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play         Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/10/2017
Today’s episode broadens our normal photographic sphere as we discuss ophthalmic photography and how the eye’s own optical system is used in conjunction with camera equipment—some techniques very common, some not so—to examine the interior of the eye and to diagnose illnesses that go far beyond problems with vision. We are joined by Mark Maio, clinical medical and ophthalmic photographer and developer of the first high-resolution digital imaging system in ophthalmology. We talk with Maio about his early interest in social justice photography, working as a “jack-of-all-trades” photographer for a hospital, and how his eventual concentration in ophthalmic photography led to early adoption of digital technology and the development of a tool that helped to transform the industry. Throughout this conversation, we learn about the use of analog and digital photography in the biomedical field and how fundus cameras and other specialized gear are used to diagnose optical and systemic maladies. When the pupil is dilated, they eye becomes a portal into the body, and with the proper tools, we can see inside our corporeal system without cutting. Maio is also an accomplished fine art and documentary photographer, and we will also discuss how these various disciplines have intersected throughout his career and resulted in the workshops he leads on ophthalmic imaging, documentary, and landscape photography on the beautiful Isle of Skye. Guest: Mark Maio From the series Saving Sight-- The Flying Eye Hospital From the series Against the Grain – Buffalo Grain Industry From the series, Isle of Skye Previous Pause Next All photographs by Mark Maio DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/02/2017
It’s a short week here at the B&H Photography Podcast, so we thought we’d take care of some cleaning that we have put off all winter. Unless one is a full-time pro or serious enthusiast, most of one’s photography is done in the fairer months of spring and summer, whether that be on family vacations, at sporting events, weekend picnics, or just working out that macro lens in the garden. So, it’s time to pull the camera bag from the closet and give our gear a quick once-over to make sure everything is in working order. In this episode, we discuss little ways to maintain cameras and lenses, and things to do to prepare them for the shooting season. From firmware upgrades to mode settings to dust and grease removal, there is a lot you can do in a short time to better understand your camera and to keep it functioning smoothly. In the second half of the show, we continue our serial “Dispatch,” with Adriane Ohanesian. This ongoing segment takes an inside look at the life and work of a freelance photojournalist working in East Africa. In this episode, Ohanesian updates us on her coverage of the conflict in Somalia as she spends time embedded with African Union troops and travels north, to photograph the effects of the ongoing drought in Puntland. She discusses being contracted by the International Rescue Committee to document the refugees “flowing” from war-torn South Sudan to settlement camps in Uganda and, finally, analyzes the risks and expenses freelance photographers take on while working in conflict zones—and the often adverse objectives of news organizations and NGOs. Guests: Todd Vorenkamp and Adriane Ohanesian Click here if you missed Episode 1 of "Dispatch." Photographs © Adriane Ohanesian Mohamed Abdi Bare, age 4, stares at the line of people inside of the waiting area at the Department of Refugee Affairs office in Shauri Moyo, Nairobi, Kenya, January, 2017. Ugandan African Union armored personnel carriers at dusk along the Afgooye road outside of Mogadishu, Somalia, February, 2017. The Ugandan African Union Special Forces wait inside of an armored personnel carrier during a night patrol in Mogadishu, Somalia, February, 2017. The shelters of nearly 400 pastoralists families who have lost a majority of their livestock due to drought, have set up camp along the road in search of food and water in Uusgure, Puntland, Somalia, February, 2017. Severely malnourished, Farhiyah, age 2, lies on the floor of her family’s hut where she stays with her three siblings and mother who came to the area in search of food and water in Uusgure, Puntland, Somalia, February, 2017. The remains of dead goats lie next to the road in Puntland, Somalia, February, 2017. South Sudanese gather to collect their belongings that were transported to the Imvepi settlement for South Sudanese refugees who have fled to northern Uganda. March, 2017. Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/02/2018
This week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast posits the notion that we are in a new “Golden Age” of landscape photography, and a fundamental attribute of this landscape photography is its embracing of digital and mobile technologies. From soaring ISO capabilities and improved dynamic range to stacking and correction software to weather, mapping, and pre-production apps, the willing photographer can plan and execute landscape images that would have been impossible to create only a few short years ago. We also suggest that the Pacific Northwest, with its proximity to the cradle of the tech industry and a spectrum of natural wonders, is the hub of this progressive landscape photography movement. Veteran photographers have adopted new technologies and created a movement, and a younger generation is following suit, certain to take landscape photography into a future that includes drones, VR, and imaging technologies yet to be imagined. We also discuss the influence of photo-sharing platforms and new career models that enable photographers to distribute their work and travel to destinations that editorial assignments would never cover. We welcome to our conversation two preëminent landscape photographers, Erin Babnik and Sean Bagshaw, who discuss their work and the use of the high-tech gear and applications in the creation of their photography. In addition to the obligatory Q and A about camera and lens choices, we discuss location and weather apps, post-process plug-ins, and even the latest foul-weather gear, all of which enable them to create the stunning work for which they are known. Both photographers are members of Photo Cascadia, and have a wide following of supporters and students. Their workshops sell out months in advance. After hearing their insights and seeing their imagery, there will be no doubt as to why. Also, at the end of today’s episode, we announce the winners of our Canon 5D Mark IV sweepstakes. Guests: Erin Babnik and Sean Bagshaw The Lost Ark © Erin Babnik Enigma © Erin Babnik Kairos © Erin Babnik Rhapsody in Blue © Erin Babnik Requiem © Erin Babnik Catching Air © Erin Babnik Wood and Stone © Sean Bagshaw The Gift Tree © Sean Bagshaw Summer Seclusion © Sean Bagshaw Mostnica Autumn © Sean Bagshaw Okshornan Peaks © Sean Bagshaw Bohinj Woods © Sean Bagshaw Lineage © Sean Bagshaw Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/16/2018
For the average photographer, many aspects of virtual reality imaging are confusing, and when you add 360° and 3D to the equation, we can really be in over our heads. Fortunately, on this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we have a guest with more than his fair share of experience in these matters, who will make the going easy as we discuss virtual reality, 3D, and 360° imaging technologies. Jim Malcolm is the North American General Manager of Humaneyes, and an expert in VR and computer vision. As President and CMO of Ricoh, Malcolm helped bring the Theta spherical cameras to the market and has now joined the pioneering 3D company Humaneyes to launch the Vuze 4K 3D 360 Spherical VR Camera. He joins us to discuss the evolution of VR technology and gear and the current tools available for professionals and consumers. He also touches on aspects of the hardware and storytelling which still need to be developed to improve the experience and we consider how certain disciplines, such as medical imaging, are already effectively utilizing these tools and how “social VR” may be the breakthrough platform for this technology. Malcolm also explains the features of the Vuze cameras and how they are bringing 360° 3D imaging to a whole new set of users with a sturdy and compact build, easy to use controls, apps and software. Join us for this very educational episode. Guest: Jim Malcolm Jim Malcolm and Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/31/2018
Today, we discuss tennis photography from two distinct points of view. Our first guest is an independent photographer with twenty years of tennis photography experience to his credit and, later, we’re joined by representatives from Drawbridge Digital, the company that is present for all three weeks of the 2018 U.S. Open, creating and managing the still photography used on U.S. Open.org. and archived by the U.S.T.A. On the first half of the show, we welcome Chris Nicholson, a veteran of our podcast, and a multi-faceted photographer whose tennis work has been published in Wired, Men’s Health, Golf Digest, Tennis Magazine, and the New York Times. We speak with Nicholson about the opportunities available for freelancers and even amateurs to shoot tennis matches and high-profile players. We discuss techniques, settings, and gear that will make your job easier and your photos better. After a break, we are joined by photographer Jen Pottheiser, and Reid Kelley of Drawbridge Digital, and we explore their massive undertaking to photograph the U.S. Open for the host organization. They work with all facets of the U.S.T.A. to provide photography to the editors at usopen.org, to their social media outlets, their marketing partners, as well as provide image storage solutions so that the thousands of photos taken at the Open can be made available for future needs. We speak with Pottheiser and Kelley about managing the workflow of the almost thirty photographers and editors on staff during the Open, about the on- and off-court images they look for, the systems they use to edit and organize the photos, and how to maintain your creativity while shooting nothing but tennis for three weeks. Join us for this timely and interesting look behind the scenes at the 2018 U.S. Open Grand Slam Tournament. Guests: Chris Nicholson, Jen Pottheiser, Reid Kelley © Chris Nicholson © Chris Nicholson © Chris Nicholson © Chris Nicholson © Chris Nicholson © Chris Nicholson © Chris Nicholson The Drawbridge Digital Team at the 2018 U.S. Open. Courtesy Drawbridge Digital Arthur Ashe Kids Day performers at 2018 U.S. Open. Courtesy Drawbridge Digital Jen Pottheiser and Reid Kelley © John Harris Reid Kelley, Allan Weitz, and Jen Pottheiser © John Harris Chris Nicholson on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris The B&H Photography Podcast team at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Courtesy Jen Pottheiser Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/21/2018
Today we welcome two of professional basketball’s best photographers, and that’s not just me talking. Nat Butler is Senior Photographer for NBA Entertainment and has worked the last thirty-three NBA Finals. He is also the official photographer for the New York Knicks and Brooklyn Nets. Andrew Bernstein is the longest-tenured official NBA photographer, the photographer for the L.A. Lakers and L.A. Clippers, a recent inductee to the NBA Hall of Fame, and the photographer of the new book, The Mamba Mentality, by Kobe Bryant. So, enough of the bona fides, these two photographers are also great friends, and they bring their easy-going banter and the ultimate insider’s perspective to the B&H Photography Podcast. Our conversation covers a wide range of topics, from the gear they use (and what they don’t), to the lighting systems they’ve developed, the intimacy of basketball photography compared to other sports, and how fashion and social media has affected their day-to-day work. We also dig into the shooting strategies they employ for each game and how their images are used by NBA Photos. Butler noted that in the past, a cover photo on Sports Illustrated would have been seen by approximately 3 million subscribers and, now, with tethering and instant feeds, a game photo can be seen by up to 30 million subscribers to the NBA Instagram feed within five minutes of the photo having been taken. Whether you are into sports photography, event and production photography, or NBA history, this easy-going episode is for you. Guests: Nat Butler and Andrew Bernstein Patrick Ewing at Madison Square Garden © Nathaniel S. Butler / NBAE / Getty Images Larry Bird and Magic Johnson © Nathaniel S. Butler / NBAE / Getty Images Tim Duncan © Nathaniel S. Butler / NBAE / Getty Images Bill Russell © Nathaniel S. Butler / NBAE / Getty Images Kobe Bryant, 1996 © Andrew Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images Kobe Bryant © Andrew Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson, 2009 © Andrew Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein, Photograph courtesy Andrew Bernstein Magic Johnson, 1987 NBA Finals Game 4 winning shot © Andrew Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images Kevin Durant and Steph Curry, 2017 NBA Finals © Andrew Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images LeBron James, 2018 © Andrew Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images Nat Butler and Andy Bernstein, 1980s Photograph courtesy Andrew Bernstein Nat Butler and Andy Bernstein, 2018 © John Harris Allan, Andrew, and Nat on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/06/2019
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome photojournalist and sports photographer Nick Didlick to our show. Didlick has been a freelance shooter, a staff photographer, an agency photographer for Reuters and UPI and, while covering the world news, was nominated for two Pulitzer Prizes. He also is an accomplished videographer, editor, and producer, and has served as Photo Chief for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics and as Director of Photography at the Vancouver Sun, where he oversaw the staff change from film to digital photography. As a photographer, Didlick has always been ahead of the technological curve, willing to try new cameras and transmission systems and push existing technology to its limits. He joins us to discuss his technical evolution as a sports photographer and the features that he considers important to balance technological advances with age-old experience of craft. We ask Didlick to look back on his career and discuss important steps in the evolution of his kit, including autofocus features, compact lenses, telephoto extenders, remote control, wireless transmission and, of course, the development of digital photography. We also look ahead to improvements in metadata and artificial intelligence and his overarching philosophy that all advances should be embraced if they are needed to improve your workflow. Throughout the episode, Didlick pokes fun at my “old” DSLR technology in favor of his Sony Alpha a9 II Mirrorless camera but, in doing so, he underscores his point, that as photographers, the hardest part of advancing your skill set is “un-learning” what you considered fundamental and embrace the changes that can improve your photography. Join us for this rollicking and enjoyable episode. Guest: Nick Didlick Above Photograph © Nick Didlick Wayne Gretzky © Nick Didlick Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev © Nick Didlick Remnants of Pan Am Flight 103, Lockerbie, Scotland © Nick Didlick Tiger Woods © Nick Didlick 2019 NCAA Final Four © Nick Didlick Lindsey Vonn © Nick Didlick Rodeo © Nick Didlick Usain Bolt stumbles and falls during race © Nick Didlick IAAF World Athletics Championship, 2019 © Nick Didlick Venus Williams © Nick Didlick Sloane Stephens with U.S. Open trophy, 2018 ©Nick Didlick Aibo dogs from Sony © Nick Didlick Nick Didlick and Allan Weitz © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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