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Posted 08/08/2016
Drones are definitely a hot-button topic and not only for photographers! Despite the controversy and legal conundrums, aerial photography is entering an incredible exciting era with the proliferation of drones. Director and photographer, Randy Slavin, founder of Yeah Drones and the New York City Drone Film Festival, provides his enthusiastic input, with product specialist Dan Campo, to a conversation about the use and misuse of drones. We talk about the legal and safety issues of flying drones, as well as the practical applications of drone shooting and, of course, highlight the best and latest in gear for the drone photographer. Randy, Dan, and our host, Allan, pepper our conversation with anecdotes from their experiences flying and filming with drones.  Guests: Randy Scott Slavin and Dan Campo Randy Scott Slavin   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/03/2017
The B&H Photography Podcast team was invited to a special event hosted by DJI and the B&H Marketing team to introduce filmmakers and photographers to the Phantom 4 Pro and Inspire 2 drones. Not only did we get to fly these incredible machines, but we took the time to talk with several photographers and drone experts to get their impressions, not only on the latest DJI models, but on other drone platforms and aerial photography applications. We begin this episode with Adam Lisberg, U.S. spokesperson for DJI, and hear his thoughts on its most recent offerings. We then sit with a previous guest, Randy Scott Slavin, of Yeah Drones and the New York City Drone Film Festival. Slavin discusses the technical leaps that drones have made in the past year, and highlights his favorite platforms. Next, we talk with Andrew Scrivani, food photographer and stylist for the New York Times and other publications, on how he is incorporating drones into his work. After a pause, we turn to a lively chat with Sara Dietschy, Kraig Adams, and Ollie Ritchie, three social media influencers using drones in their content creation. Then we speak with Roberto Blake, a YouTube educator, who took advantage of this event to fly his first drone; he offers wonderful insight from the perspective of a newbie. We then welcome podcasters Chris Barrows and Amir Zonozi, from “ Why I Social,” for information on the P4 Pro and on flying in restricted areas, and we conclude with drone builder and pilot Parker Gyokeres, from Propellerheads Aerial Photography, to get his take on why he switched from homebuilding drones to DJI. Join us for this multifaceted episode on the latest in drone technology, and listen for a B&H Photography Podcast exclusive promo code to get free propellers and a discount on the extended protection plan for the Mavic Pro, from DJI. Guests: Adam Lisberg, Randy Scott Slavin, Andrew Scrivani, Sara Dietschy, Kraig Adams, Ollie Ritchie, Roberto Blake, Chris Barrows, Amir Zonozi, and Parker Gyokeres Photographs © John R Harris The DJI Inspire 2 Drone Flying the Phantom 4 Pro on the roof of the Bathhouse Studio Randy Scott Slavin and Allan Weitz Andrew Scrivani Kraig Adams, Ollie Ritchie, Allan Weitz and Sara Dietschy Parker Gyokeres with the Inspire 2 My first photo taken with a drone DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/10/2017
Today’s episode broadens our normal photographic sphere as we discuss ophthalmic photography and how the eye’s own optical system is used in conjunction with camera equipment—some techniques very common, some not so—to examine the interior of the eye and to diagnose illnesses that go far beyond problems with vision. We are joined by Mark Maio, clinical medical and ophthalmic photographer and developer of the first high-resolution digital imaging system in ophthalmology. We talk with Maio about his early interest in social justice photography, working as a “jack-of-all-trades” photographer for a hospital, and how his eventual concentration in ophthalmic photography led to early adoption of digital technology and the development of a tool that helped to transform the industry. Throughout this conversation, we learn about the use of analog and digital photography in the biomedical field and how fundus cameras and other specialized gear are used to diagnose optical and systemic maladies. When the pupil is dilated, they eye becomes a portal into the body, and with the proper tools, we can see inside our corporeal system without cutting. Maio is also an accomplished fine art and documentary photographer, and we will also discuss how these various disciplines have intersected throughout his career and resulted in the workshops he leads on ophthalmic imaging, documentary, and landscape photography on the beautiful Isle of Skye. Guest: Mark Maio From the series Saving Sight-- The Flying Eye Hospital From the series Against the Grain – Buffalo Grain Industry From the series, Isle of Skye Previous Pause Next All photographs by Mark Maio DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/16/2018
As Allan Weitz says in the introduction, when you see a Jeffrey Milstein photo, you know it. He has a distinctive style, which is not an easy accomplishment for an aerial photographer. But, of course, not all his images are taken from high above—he also has an incredible series shot from underneath airplanes. All kidding aside, Milstein’s work—aerial or otherwise—is infused with the complexity of observation and with the fascination of how similar forms repeat themselves in distinctive ways. On this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Jeff Milstein about his photography, with an emphasis on his aerial photography and the process, gear, and technique he uses to capture these stunning images. We discuss his previous career as an architect and the influence that carries into his work, the medium format and 35mm format digital camera he prefers, and his lens choices. Along with Weitz, who also has much aerial photography experience, we discuss using a gyro stabilizer and the advancements made in in-camera stabilization systems. We also chat about communication with pilots and how to plan a helicopter aerial shoot. Milstein also discusses the post-production techniques used to create his geometric compositions and the large format prints he makes, many of which are currently on exhibit at the Benrubi Gallery, in New York. Guest: Jeffrey Milstein Boeing 757-200, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Airbus A340-300, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Boeing 737-700, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Boeing 747-400, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Caribbean Princess, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Carnival Sensation, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Carnival Victory at Night, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein 5th Ave. Midtown, New York, NY, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Park La Brea, Los Angeles, CA, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Stuyvesant Town, New York, NY, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Coney Island, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Disneyland, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Gatwick Airport, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein LAX Airport, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Jeffrey Milstein, Photograph © John Harris Jeffrey Milstein and Allan Weitz, Photograph © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/25/2018
Can you imagine a better perspective? On today's episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome two shooting buddies who, perhaps not so coincidentally, happen to be talented and inspirational landscape photographers. Ryan Dyar and Miles Morgan are both well recognized for their gorgeous "land-based" landscape photography and post-production skills, but over the past few years, both have incorporated drone photography into their workflow. Our show today is a discussion of their aesthetic approach, and of the techniques and gear Dyar and Morgan use to make their stylized landscape images using drones. The topics we discuss are the differences between aerial photography and drone photography (Morgan is also a pilot) and, of course, composing from a tripod as opposed to a monitor image relayed from a few hundred feet in the air. We also talk about camera settings, long-exposure photography, drone choices, flying techniques, how to handle inclement weather, scouting locations, and the legal restrictions on drone operation. It is quite an informative episode, but, what also becomes clear is the camaraderie between Dyar and Morgan and how their friendship not only informs when and where they photograph but also how they work, how they view photography as a practice and, certainly, the influence each has upon the other in terms of their shooting styles. Join us for this enjoyable conversation. Guests: Miles Morgan and Ryan Dyar Photograph © Miles Morgan © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/28/2019
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we present two conversations from the 2019 OPTIC Photography Conference. Both chats are with photographers who understand the value of sharing their experiences and skills with other photographers and embracing the idea that to be a teacher is also a path for learning. Our first conversation is with travel and landscape photographer Elia Locardi, who is also well known for his photography tutorials with Fstoppers, photo tours, and YouTube series on travel photography. With Locardi, we discuss the true value of travel photography and the connections to people and cultures that a camera can grant you. We also discuss how he balances his role as an educator with his personal photography. After a short break, we welcome photographer Alan Winslow to discuss his editorial and grant-funded photo projects, including a series in development that utilizes interactive technology and his own photography to inform viewers about threatened and endangered species. Winslow is also a FUJIFILM photographer who recently used the new GFX 100 Medium Format Mirrorless Camera to shoot “alternative” landscapes in Yosemite National Park, and we hear his impressions of this camera. In addition to his photography clients, which include the New York Times and Forbes magazine, Winslow teaches at the International Center of Photography, The Maine Media Workshop, and NYCSalt. Balancing one’s own photography practice with making a living as a photography educator is becoming an ever more common practice and, on today’s episode, we gain an understanding of the challenges and benefits of this approach. Join us. Guests: Elia Locardi and Alan Winslow Above Photograph © Alan Winslow  Yosemite National Park © Alan Winslow Yosemite National Park © Alan Winslow Yosemite National Park © Alan Winslow Yosemite National Park © Alan Winslow Mt Fuji, 2014 © Elia Locardi Mt Bromo, Indonesia, 2013 © Elia Locardi Tiger’s Nest Monastery, Bhutan, 2015 © Elia Locardi Hong Kong, 2016 © Elia Locardi Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/13/2019
With an exhibition of his 40-year photographic career opening at the Rubin Museum of Art, in New York, photojournalist and social justice activist Shahidul Alam was kind enough to join us on the B&H Photography Podcast to discuss the current exhibit, his career, and the state of photojournalism around the world. Also joining us is scholar, archivist, and the author of Conversations on Conflict Photography, Dr. Lauren Walsh. Truth to Power is the name of the Alam’s exhibition and it is “a tribute to the numerous acts of resistance all across the globe and gives hope to those who continue to believe that a better world is possible.” As the name indicates, Alam’s work confronts the injustices in his native Bangladesh, where he has spent a career photographing natural disasters, social inequalities, street protests, migrant workers, and investigating those murdered or kidnapped. He also founded the Chobi Mela Photography Festival and the Drik and Majority World photo agencies, which have enabled countless photographers a better chance to have their stories seen by a larger audience. In addition to learning about Alam’s career, his 2018 arrest, and his selection as one of Time magazine’s 2018 “Persons of the Year,” we discuss with Walsh and Alam many topics crucial to an understanding of modern photojournalism. We ask about how to shape a visual narrative for maximum effect, about the benefits of including graphic violence in an edit, and how journalists must protect themselves, not just from physical attacks, but from cyber and social media attacks. We also discuss the importance (and the dangers) of local journalists covering their own stories. Join us for this incredibly compelling episode. Guests: Shahidul Alam and Dr. Lauren Walsh Photograph © Shahidul Alam Dhaka Siege Day; Motijheel, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 1987 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy of Drik/Majority World Mural of Noor Hossain in Jahangirnagar University Campus; Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1987 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy of Drik/Majority World Bishwa Ijtema; Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1988 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Woman in Ballot Booth; Lamatia, Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1991 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Smriti Azad at Protest at Shaheed Minar; Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1994 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Airport Goodbye; Dhaka Airport, Bangladesh, 1996 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Climate Refugees; river crossing between Bondor Tila Ghat in Mijhum Dwip and Moktaria Bazar in Hatiya, Bangladesh, 2009 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Sailboat Fishing for Ilish; Daulatdia, Bangladesh, 2001 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Sheep at Sunset; Tibetan Plateau, 1999 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Rohingya Refugees After Having Just Landed in Bangladesh; Teknaf, Bangladesh, 2017 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Shahidul Alam © John Harris Dr. Lauren Walsh © John Harris Shahidul Alam speaks with Allan Weitz on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris John Harris, Allan Weitz, Shahidul Alam, and Lauren Walsh © Jason Tables “Shahidul Alam: Truth to Power” at Rubin Museum of Art © John Harris “Shahidul Alam: Truth to Power” at Rubin Museum of Art © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/24/2019
It’s hard to believe that another year of the B&H Photography Podcast is on the books and, as has become our way, we close out the year with a casual conversation about our most memorable episodes from 2019. But before we get started, a recent count showed that we have listeners in all but 15 countries. To us, that’s remarkable, and we’d like to offer a very heartfelt thank you and best wishes for a happy new year to all our listeners around the world. We look forward to your feedback and suggestions for photography conversations in 2020. Allan Weitz starts off today’s show with a few of his favorite 2019 episodes, including our talk with photographer Stephen Mallon, who documented the recovery of Flight 1549 —referred to as the “Miracle on the Hudson”—from the icy waters of the Hudson River after its forced landing in January 2009. On that episode, we welcomed Denise Lockie, a passenger on that flight. Allan also mentions our conversations with Albert Watson and Vince Aletti as favorites, and our chats on car photography with Nate Hassler and on D.I.Y. camera makers. For his part, Jason Tables starts his list with our episode on storm chasing and extreme-weather photography as a favorite. He also recalls “The Copyright Infringement Superhighway” with attorney David Deal, our talk with photographer Corinne May Botz on her series “Milk Factory,” and our hilarious and insightful conversation with portraitist Mark Mann. John Harris begins with some of the 2019 episodes that performed best in terms of number of downloads, some of which surprised us. He also discusses a few of his favorites episodes, including “Conflict Photography—Motivation and Consequence.” Other memorable episodes he mentions are “Commitment to Community—Rhynna Santos, Michael Young, and the Bronx Documentary Center,” our talks with rock photographer Mick Rock and photojournalist Shahidul Alam, and, of course, our conversation with actor and photographer Jeff Bridges. Enjoy our casual end-of-the-year chat, subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on Apple Podcasts, join our Facebook group, and have yourself a happy new year. Photographs © John Harris Allan Weitz, Denise Lockie, Stephen Mallon, 2019 © John Harris Rhynna Santos, 2019 © John Harris Michael Young, 2019 © John Harris Vince Aletti, 2019 © John Harris A.J. Bernstein, Allan Weitz, Orlando Mendez, Norman Blake, 2019 © John Harris Bill Shapiro, 2019 © John Harris Shahidul Alam, 2019 © John Harris Albert Watson, 2019 © John Harris Jeannette Garcia, Allan Weitz, and Yaakov Katz, 2019 © John Harris Santiago Lyon and Anthony Feinstein © Allan Weitz Mitra Saboury, Allan Weitz, Ben Zank, Cory Rice, 2019 © John Harris Petronella Lugemwa and Allan Weitz, 2019 © John Harris Liz Groeschen and Corinne May Botz, 2019 © John Harris Ron Haviv, Allan Weitz, and Dr. Lauren Walsh, 2019 © John Harris Allan Weitz, Monica Lozano, Stefan Falke, 2019 © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/05/2020
On the suggestion of a listener, we contacted a few Australian photographers to get their take on the devastating bushfire season that has burned more than 18 million hectares and taken thirty-four lives, since June 2019. We were fortunate to connect with Nick Moir, self-described storm-chaser, wildfire photographer, and current chief photographer at the Sydney Morning Herald. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Moir about his experiences photographing this year’s fires, as well as the overall news coverage of this disaster. Moir won a 2003 World Press Photographers Award for his coverage of that season’s bushfires, so he knows of what he speaks, and we talk with him about his approach to shooting such a dangerous subject, including planning, gear, safety measures, and the type of fire photos he prefers to make. We also discuss with Moir the fire season itself and why this year is so much worse than previous seasons. Finally, we talk about the news coverage of the fires and how his news organization covers the many stories that are part of this disaster, in comparison to how international journalists and news organizations cover the story. Before we speak with Moir, we welcome David Brommer, organizer of the 2020 Depth of Field Professional Portrait, Wedding, and Event Photography Conference, which takes place here in New York and streams online, on February 11 and 12. Join us for this timely conversation. Guests: Nick Moir and David Brommer Photograph © Nick Moir/Sydney Morning Herald Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/25/2020
What obstacles have gotten in the way of your photography? When life’s troubles arise, where do you point your camera? Or do you set it down? Photography can be a weekend hobby or it can be a life’s calling and, for our guests on today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, there is no doubt that photography is part of their very being, and meshed into the most intimate aspects of their lives. Adriane Ohanesian and Nancy Borowick have been friends since they studied together at the International Center of Photography, and have remained close despite careers that have put them on opposite sides of the globe. Both had specific aspirations while studying, both have received professional recognition as photographers, and both have faced tragedy and pain with a steady hand and unflinching eye. In addition to her many assignments for the likes of Time magazine and the New York Times, Borowick documented her parent’s parallel treatments for stage-four cancer. And as a photojournalist in East Africa, Ohanesian has covered war, refugee crisis, climate change, and illegal mining. Not only has she witnessed and documented extreme human brutality, she has been caught in the crossfire on more than one occasion. As part of B&H’s content for International Women’s Day, which is on March 8, 2020, we asked Borowick and Ohanesian to join us for a conversation about the role photography has played in their lives and to discuss their careers thus far. For both women, 2019 will be a watershed year—Borowick welcomed her first baby and Ohanesian survived a plane crash that has left her broken but unbowed. After a decade of “the hustle,” they also take a moment to gaze into the future of their photo careers and we are proud to be privy to this conversation and present it to our listeners. Join us for this real-world conversation among two accomplished photographers. Guests: Adriane Ohanesian and Nancy Borowick Adriane Ohanesian and Nancy Borowick at the International Center of Photography, in 2010. Photograph courtesy Nancy Borowick Allan Weitz, Adriane Ohanesian, and Nancy Borowick. Photograph © John Harris Hundreds of women and children who have fled the fighting and are seeking shelter from continued bombing by the Sudanese government's forces live in a cave, in Central Darfur, Sudan, March 2, 2015. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian A young boy looks over the Mahama Refugee Camp that currently houses more than 24,000 people who have fled from Burundi to Rwanda, May 14, 2015. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian Martha helps to bury her six-month-old daughter, in a mass grave for children in the cemetery across the road from the UN base in Bentiu, South Sudan, June 30, 2014. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian Healthcare workers pause for a photo as they finish dressing in their Personal Protective Equipment, at the beginning of the morning shift at the treatment center in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic, in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 5, 2019. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Ebola responders with an armed police escort run with one of two coffins to be buried at the cemetery on a hill in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 6, 2019. The responders have been a frequent target in attacks by community members and militias. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal From the “The Family Imprint.” Photograph © Nancy Borowick From the “The Family Imprint.” Photograph © Nancy Borowick From the “The Family Imprint.” Photograph © Nancy Borowick Senator Kristen Gillibrand and family. Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2013 From the “Single Ladies” series. Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2011 From the “Part of the Pack” series. Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2016 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2019 Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2020 Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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