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Posted 02/03/2016
Despite poking a little fun with this episode’s title, we are big fans of photography websites and camera blogs, and if you are reading this, you probably are, too. On this week’s podcast, we are fortunate to have Kevin Raber and Jason Hermann, proprietors of Luminous Landscape and SonyAlphaLab, respectively. Have you ever wondered how sites like these operate, are funded, get gear to review and deal with the, shall we say “experts,” who populate the comment sections? In this very animated, on-point conversation, Raber and Hermann talk specifically about their sites, the proliferation of gear chat, and the camera industry in general. Guests: Kevin Raber and Jason Hermann To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS.   Photos by  Kevin Raber   Photos by Jason Hermann b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 09/22/2016
Coney Island and photography have been together almost since birth. There is a great tradition of photography associated with this beach, located at the last stop of the D, F, N, and Q trains, in Brooklyn. Our guest, photographer Mark Hartman, created an intense summer project of walking the beach at Coney Island photographing the interesting people who crossed his path. His project was disciplined and relatively short, but thanks to a little app called Instagram, his austere, detailed, and colorful portraiture has quickly found many fans. Hartman was kind enough to join us to talk about his series and the gear, techniques, and attitude that has made it such a success. We are also joined by writer and photographer Todd Vorenkamp, who adds insight to our discussion with Hartman, and also offers some very practical tips on how to keep your gear clean, dry, and sand-free while shooting on the beach. Why a show on beach photography as summer draws to a close? Well, as anyone who has photographed on the beach (and who hasn’t?) will tell you, it’s not just a summertime thang—the people, architecture, nature, wildlife, water, and sunsets are there year-round and whether it’s a jam-packed Sunday at Coney or a contemplative, deserted windswept winterscape, the beach is always a great place for photography. Guests: Mark Hartman, Todd Vorenkamp Photographs – Mark Hartman * with deference to Lawrence Ferlinghetti Mark Hartman, Allan Weitz, and Todd Vorenkamp Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play         Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/20/2017
We are living in a Golden Age of landscape photography. Digital cameras and improved software enable the kind of imaging that until recently was only possible via the budgets of large publications and the talents and ambitions of a few select photographers. Ambition and talent remain, and with enhanced dynamic range and color algorithms, higher sensitivity settings, simplified stitching and compositing software, and a network of websites to display work, impressive landscape photography is abundant; however,  there are new masters and the skill set of current practitioners includes not only those of the photographer, but also of the savvy digital graphic artist.  With the ability to pull details from shadows, augment colors, and combine distinct files into a single image now easier than ever, we must ask—is it acceptable to represent nature without natural characteristics, to merge photos from different focal lengths into one image, or add a blazing sunset to a foreground taken hours or days apart? Can images composed in such a way even be defined as photography and does an ethos, akin to that in photojournalism, apply to nature photography? These are some of the questions we pose to two incredible landscape photographers,  Adam Burton  and  Ryan Dyar. We spoke with them separately, but prepared a similar set of questions, and asked them to walk us through their in-camera workflow and post-process techniques. We spoke about their approach to a scene, their use of “grad-filters” and plug-ins, acceptable degrees of enhancement, and strove to understand if there is indeed an ethics to landscape photography. Guests:  Ryan Dyar and Adam Burton Unprocessed image (left) and post processed image (right) Adam Burton Adam Burton Adam Burton Adam Burton Adam Burton Adam Burton Unprocessed image (left) and post processed image (right) Ryan Dyar Ryan Dyar Ryan Dyar Ryan Dyar Ryan Dyar DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/27/2017
On today’s show, we continue our conversations on landscape photography with Daniel Kordan, one of the most interesting nature and landscape photographers working today. Amongst his many accomplishments, he can count having an image used as wallpaper for Apple computers, and while that is indeed impressive, if you dig deep into his Instagram feed or website, you’ll soon realize that his talents run wide and deep. From Greenland to Ushuaia, and Russia to Japan, the work he produces is consistently breathtaking, and we speak with him on a range of subjects from his thoughts on post-processing, to lens choices, to shooting in isolated locales, to whether he prefers to shoot alone or with members of the many workshops he now leads. Join us for this inspirational episode and be sure to check out our new podcast page on the B&H website for more images by Kordan, and our complete library of podcast episodes. Guest: Daniel Kordan Photographs © Daniel Kordan DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/01/2017
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we continue our exploration of photographic collaboration with photojournalists Ben Lowy and Marvi Lacar. In addition to sharing a vocation, they also share two children and a life together. Photojournalism is a decidedly independent, at times dangerous, career, certainly not one known for a routine home life, but when domestic responsibilities and children enter the picture, how does a couple balance craft and career with the need to earn a living and the time needed to nurture relationships? More so, when both people are working in the same field, how does bolstering one career cross the line into debilitating the other and how do the individuals comprising a creative couple find ways to support each other’s efforts? Lowy and Lacar bring an animated humor and a willingness to talk about the difficult moments from their lives and careers, and explain how they have come to recognize their best personal and professional attributes, bringing those strengths into a working relationship that continues to evolve. Guests: Marvi Lacar and Ben Lowy From the series "Melting Pot," Marvi Lacar From the series "Melting Pot," Marvi Lacar From the series "U.S. Bases," Marvi Lacar From the series "U.S. Bases," Marvi Lacar From “This Is a Love Story,” Marvi Lacar From “This Is a Love Story,” Marvi Lacar 2004 Democratic National Convention, Ben Lowy Protest at 2004 Republican National Convention, Ben Lowy Iraq Perspectives #1, Ben Lowy Iraq perspectives, #2, Ben Lowy Wounded soldier, Iraq, Ben Lowy Ski Jumper, Sochi, 2014, Ben Lowy Speed Skater, Sochi, 2014, Ben Lowy Great White Shark, 2016, Ben Lowy Seal, 2016, Ben Lowy Ben Lowy and Marvi Lacar at B&H Photography Podcast, John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/02/2018
This week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast posits the notion that we are in a new “Golden Age” of landscape photography, and a fundamental attribute of this landscape photography is its embracing of digital and mobile technologies. From soaring ISO capabilities and improved dynamic range to stacking and correction software to weather, mapping, and pre-production apps, the willing photographer can plan and execute landscape images that would have been impossible to create only a few short years ago. We also suggest that the Pacific Northwest, with its proximity to the cradle of the tech industry and a spectrum of natural wonders, is the hub of this progressive landscape photography movement. Veteran photographers have adopted new technologies and created a movement, and a younger generation is following suit, certain to take landscape photography into a future that includes drones, VR, and imaging technologies yet to be imagined. We also discuss the influence of photo-sharing platforms and new career models that enable photographers to distribute their work and travel to destinations that editorial assignments would never cover. We welcome to our conversation two preëminent landscape photographers, Erin Babnik and Sean Bagshaw, who discuss their work and the use of the high-tech gear and applications in the creation of their photography. In addition to the obligatory Q and A about camera and lens choices, we discuss location and weather apps, post-process plug-ins, and even the latest foul-weather gear, all of which enable them to create the stunning work for which they are known. Both photographers are members of Photo Cascadia, and have a wide following of supporters and students. Their workshops sell out months in advance. After hearing their insights and seeing their imagery, there will be no doubt as to why. Also, at the end of today’s episode, we announce the winners of our Canon 5D Mark IV sweepstakes. Guests: Erin Babnik and Sean Bagshaw The Lost Ark © Erin Babnik Enigma © Erin Babnik Kairos © Erin Babnik Rhapsody in Blue © Erin Babnik Requiem © Erin Babnik Catching Air © Erin Babnik Wood and Stone © Sean Bagshaw The Gift Tree © Sean Bagshaw Summer Seclusion © Sean Bagshaw Mostnica Autumn © Sean Bagshaw Okshornan Peaks © Sean Bagshaw Bohinj Woods © Sean Bagshaw Lineage © Sean Bagshaw Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/09/2018
Murray Fredericks considers his landscape photography series, "Vanity," as just one aspect of a larger body of work, a project for which he has spent fifteen years shooting in southern Australia's remote Kati Thanda–Lake Eyre. However, this part of the larger series has one aspect that the others do not—a large mirror placed in the lake bed, reflecting other angles of the land and sky. This seemingly simple idea transforms not only the vista but our visual understanding of this singular place, and I think it's fair to say that there is nothing comparable to these large color photographs that attempt to represent the "overwhelming emptiness and powerful emotional resonance of remote land and sky." For this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we took our mics to the Robert Mann Gallery, in New York, to speak with Murray Fredericks and gallery owner Robert Mann on the opening day of Fredericks’s first solo exhibit in the United States. We walked through the gallery, soaking up the sublimity of these images and discussing the challenges of the project, the gear, the prints, and all aspects of the collaboration between artist and gallery. Join us for this extraordinary conversation. Stay tuned toward the end of the show, when we chat with the two winners of our Canon 5D Mark IV Sweepstakes and hear their reactions to winning and how they will be using their new cameras. Guests: Murray Fredericks and Robert Mann; Canon Sweepstakes winners Hillary Dunning and Tim Couch Mirror 8, 2017 © Murray Fredericks, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Mirror 12, 2017 © Murray Fredericks, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Mirror 7, 2017 © Murray Fredericks, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Mirror 14, 2017 © Murray Fredericks, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Mirror 16, 2017 © Murray Fredericks, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Mirror 18, 2017 © Murray Fredericks, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Mirror 19, 2017 © Murray Fredericks, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Mirror 21, 2017 © Murray Fredericks, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Installation view of “Vanity”, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Murray Fredericks and the B&H Podcast team © Todd Vorenkamp Robert Mann, Allan Weitz, Murray Fredericks © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/08/2018
Hosted by B&H Photo, the 2018 OPTIC Conference for Outdoor and Travel Photography was a wonderful opportunity to speak with a diverse group of great photographers, and we did just that. We sat down with a diverse mix of shooters, including Joyce Tenneson, Xyza Cruz Bacani, Keith Carter, and Sisse Brimberg. Over the course of the next few weeks, we will present these conversations, but today we start with National Geographic staff photographer Mark Thiessen, who, in addition to running the photo studio at NatGeo and shooting many stories for the magazine, has continued a twenty-year personal project on wildfires. To know his subject better, to be safer, and to get closer to the action, Thiessen became a certified wildland firefighter and travels to active fires each year to photograph the fires, as well as the property destruction and human toll taken by these wildfires. We speak with Thiessen about his experiences, tools and techniques for photographing fires, and about his other work for National Geographic. We also take a few minutes to catch up with Rod Clark, of Wine Country Camera. At OPTIC 2017, we spoke with Clark about the beautiful filter-holder system he developed, and now we find out how his company has grown since last year, and what Wine Country Camera has brought to the market. Guests: Mark Thiessen and Rod Clark Photograph by Mark Thiessen © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "Russian Smokejumpers" © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "Russian Smokejumpers" © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "Russian Smokejumpers" © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "Russian Smokejumpers" © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "Russian Smokejumpers" © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "The Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke" © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "The Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke" © National Geographic Mark Thiessen on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/25/2018
Can you imagine a better perspective? On today's episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome two shooting buddies who, perhaps not so coincidentally, happen to be talented and inspirational landscape photographers. Ryan Dyar and Miles Morgan are both well recognized for their gorgeous "land-based" landscape photography and post-production skills, but over the past few years, both have incorporated drone photography into their workflow. Our show today is a discussion of their aesthetic approach, and of the techniques and gear Dyar and Morgan use to make their stylized landscape images using drones. The topics we discuss are the differences between aerial photography and drone photography (Morgan is also a pilot) and, of course, composing from a tripod as opposed to a monitor image relayed from a few hundred feet in the air. We also talk about camera settings, long-exposure photography, drone choices, flying techniques, how to handle inclement weather, scouting locations, and the legal restrictions on drone operation. It is quite an informative episode, but, what also becomes clear is the camaraderie between Dyar and Morgan and how their friendship not only informs when and where they photograph but also how they work, how they view photography as a practice and, certainly, the influence each has upon the other in terms of their shooting styles. Join us for this enjoyable conversation. Guests: Miles Morgan and Ryan Dyar Photograph © Miles Morgan © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/24/2018
It has been a fabulous year for the B&H Photography Podcast, with an incredibly diverse set of topics we discussed, and guests we welcomed. The podcast team is very thankful to those who gave their time to talk about our shared passion, and to the listeners who join us every week, and those who chime in with comments and suggestions. Although today’s episode is looking back at our favorite moments from 2018, we also look forward to 2019 and improving the podcast: experimenting with our audio stylings, expanding engagement with listeners, offering more sweepstakes and, of course, continuing to bring wonderful guests to explore the worlds of photography. For today’s “clip show,” Jason, Allan, and I offer our own lists of best moments from the year’s episodes and then try to come up with a personal favorite. It’s not easy, but Allan settled on our recent episode with Jay Maisel and Stephen Wilkes. We include clips from this episode and few others, including my surprise favorite, “The Story Demands More,” with Greg Constantine. Some of our choices overlap, but Jason couldn’t decide between “Embracing Technology in the ‘New’ Landscape Photography” or “Time Vector—Day to Night,” with Stephen and Bette Wilkes. Have a listen to moments from these episodes and a few others, and go back through our catalog of more than 150 episodes. Hopefully, there’s something in there for every type of photographer. Let us know your favorite of the year, and thank you again to everyone who has made this a successful and enjoyable year at the B&H Photography Podcast. Bangladesh, 2017 Greg Constantine   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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