Don’t Miss an Episode Subscribe Now

Refine
Done
0 Plays
Posted 03/17/2017
For this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we replace the camera in our hand with a game controller, but if artistic interpretation of your surroundings is the goal, is there any difference between the two? Today, we talk gaming and photography and, specifically, the practice of in-game or virtual photography. While grabbing a screenshot of your high score is nothing new, using a gaming system’s increasingly advanced photo tools to capture images of the gaming world in which you are immersed is becoming a discipline unto itself. For sure, some gamers are still looking to show off their accomplishments and share them with fellow gamers, but others approach it as a landscape photographer, documentarian or combat photographer might, utilizing light and exposure controls to create dramatic images that showcase or even surpass those created by the game itself. We are joined today by our in-house gaming expert, Akeem Addy, as well as Tobias Andersson, Senior Producer of the Hunter: Call of the Wild, by Avalanche Studios, and two gamers who have explored in-game photography from distinctive perspectives, photographer Leo Sang and artist Eron Rauch. We also take time to talk a bit about the history of in-game photography and suggest games with some of the strongest photo tools. The debate about whether this is “real” photography will rage on. However, our guests are over that, not only creating beautiful and interesting photos, but elevating the dialogue to create images that question the relationship between the virtual and the “work-a-day” world. Join us for this multi-faceted episode and let us know your thoughts on gaming and photography—and even share with us your best images on Twitter @BHPhotoVideo with #BhPhotoPodcast. Guests: Akeem Addy, Tobias Andersson, Leo Sang, and Eron Rauch © Battlefield 1 Image by Leo Sang © Battlefield 1 Image by Leo Sang © Ghost Recon: Wildlands Image by Leo Sang © Grand Theft Auto V Image by Leo Sang Made with NVIDIA Ansel Image by Leo Sang From the series A Land to Die In by Eron Rauch From the Series A Land to Die In by Eron Rauch From the series A Land to Die In by Eron Rauch From the series Arcana by Eron Rauch From the series Valhalla Nocturnes by Eron Rauch © theHunter: Call of the Wild, courtesy Avalanche Studios © theHunter: Call of the Wild, courtesy Avalanche Studios © theHunter: Call of the Wild, courtesy Avalanche Studios © theHunter: Call of the Wild, courtesy Avalanche Studios Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 08/11/2017
Structure and limitation is the key to the artistic process. This is the idea that opens our conversation with photographer and publisher Brooks Jensen. In addition to his work as a fine-art photographer, Jensen is well recognized as the publisher of LensWork, the beautiful print magazine (and website) about photographs (not cameras!). We speak with him about LensWork’s “Seeing in Sixes” competition, in which photographers submit a series of just six images with the idea that this limited number forces efficiency and creativity. Our discussion glides to other topics, such as the purpose of art, digital versus analog preservation, and the simple joy of creating and sharing your work. On the second half of our show we return for Episode Four of “Dispatch,” with Adriane Ohanesian. In this segment, Ohanesian talks about the cameras, lenses, and gear she uses in covering breaking and long-form news in Africa. She compares her newer Sony mirrorless to her Canon “tanks,” and offers insight on working in some of the toughest conditions imaginable. Ohanesian also continues to detail her assignment work and, on this occasion, she is in the Democratic Republic of the Congo with rangers combating illegal poaching and mining in the Okapi Wildlife Reserve. She tells of the region and its struggle for resources, and of the dangers, both natural and human, which confront locals and visitors. Chronicling her time with the rangers and her miles-long hikes through thick jungle, she shares thoughts on developing the photo narrative she hopes to relate with understated humor, and prepares us for the next chapter to this story, which ultimately turns quite tragic. Guests: Brooks Jensen and Adriane Ohanesian Previous Pause Next "Shoji – In Praise of Shadows," from Seeing in Sixes Brooks Jensen DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 09/01/2017
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we continue our exploration of photographic collaboration with photojournalists Ben Lowy and Marvi Lacar. In addition to sharing a vocation, they also share two children and a life together. Photojournalism is a decidedly independent, at times dangerous, career, certainly not one known for a routine home life, but when domestic responsibilities and children enter the picture, how does a couple balance craft and career with the need to earn a living and the time needed to nurture relationships? More so, when both people are working in the same field, how does bolstering one career cross the line into debilitating the other and how do the individuals comprising a creative couple find ways to support each other’s efforts? Lowy and Lacar bring an animated humor and a willingness to talk about the difficult moments from their lives and careers, and explain how they have come to recognize their best personal and professional attributes, bringing those strengths into a working relationship that continues to evolve. Guests: Marvi Lacar and Ben Lowy From the series "Melting Pot," Marvi Lacar From the series "Melting Pot," Marvi Lacar From the series "U.S. Bases," Marvi Lacar From the series "U.S. Bases," Marvi Lacar From “This Is a Love Story,” Marvi Lacar From “This Is a Love Story,” Marvi Lacar 2004 Democratic National Convention, Ben Lowy Protest at 2004 Republican National Convention, Ben Lowy Iraq Perspectives #1, Ben Lowy Iraq perspectives, #2, Ben Lowy Wounded soldier, Iraq, Ben Lowy Ski Jumper, Sochi, 2014, Ben Lowy Speed Skater, Sochi, 2014, Ben Lowy Great White Shark, 2016, Ben Lowy Seal, 2016, Ben Lowy Ben Lowy and Marvi Lacar at B&H Photography Podcast, John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 08/28/2019
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we present two conversations from the 2019 OPTIC Photography Conference. Both chats are with photographers who understand the value of sharing their experiences and skills with other photographers and embracing the idea that to be a teacher is also a path for learning. Our first conversation is with travel and landscape photographer Elia Locardi, who is also well known for his photography tutorials with Fstoppers, photo tours, and YouTube series on travel photography. With Locardi, we discuss the true value of travel photography and the connections to people and cultures that a camera can grant you. We also discuss how he balances his role as an educator with his personal photography. After a short break, we welcome photographer Alan Winslow to discuss his editorial and grant-funded photo projects, including a series in development that utilizes interactive technology and his own photography to inform viewers about threatened and endangered species. Winslow is also a FUJIFILM photographer who recently used the new GFX 100 Medium Format Mirrorless Camera to shoot “alternative” landscapes in Yosemite National Park, and we hear his impressions of this camera. In addition to his photography clients, which include the New York Times and Forbes magazine, Winslow teaches at the International Center of Photography, The Maine Media Workshop, and NYCSalt. Balancing one’s own photography practice with making a living as a photography educator is becoming an ever more common practice and, on today’s episode, we gain an understanding of the challenges and benefits of this approach. Join us. Guests: Elia Locardi and Alan Winslow Above Photograph © Alan Winslow  Yosemite National Park © Alan Winslow Yosemite National Park © Alan Winslow Yosemite National Park © Alan Winslow Yosemite National Park © Alan Winslow Mt Fuji, 2014 © Elia Locardi Mt Bromo, Indonesia, 2013 © Elia Locardi Tiger’s Nest Monastery, Bhutan, 2015 © Elia Locardi Hong Kong, 2016 © Elia Locardi Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 09/25/2019
When one of the world’s most “followed” photographers is available for a conversation, you make the time to talk with him, and when that photographer is acclaimed adventure, landscape, travel, and surf photographer Chris Burkard, expect that conversation to include some serious insights into the passion and ambition it takes to create the beautiful images he makes. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Burkard about a range of subjects—and this conversation does not disappoint. We get right into it by asking about his penchant for shooting in frigid locations, and how stubbornness and even persistence can be the enemy of good photography in sub-zero temperatures. We discuss the composition of his photographs and how that is indicative of his views on nature, and we dig into his “origin story” and why clients began to come to him for the kind of photography he creates. In general, however, we stick to the nuts and bolts of his photography. We learn why he prefers mirrorless cameras, specifically the Sony Alpha a7R IV, how he organizes his commercial workflow to make time for the adventures he craves, and how he sets time aside to be with his young family. After a break, we ask Burkard to walk us through the creation of a few of his best-known images. Not only does he offer insight into the photographic aspects, but he elaborates to give us a better understanding of the remote locations he finds and the teamwork needed. To quote Burkard, “to better understand how the Earth was made, we must look at it from new perspectives.” Join us for this eye-opening conversation. Guest: Chris Burkard Aleutian Islands, 2013 © Chris Burkard Westfjord, Iceland, 2016 © Chris Burkard Highlining in Joshua Tree with Garrison Rowland on Hall of Horrors formation during the Supermoon, 2016 © Chris Burkard Skógar, Iceland, 2014 © Chris Burkard Westfjord, Iceland, 2016 © Chris Burkard Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 11/13/2019
With an exhibition of his 40-year photographic career opening at the Rubin Museum of Art, in New York, photojournalist and social justice activist Shahidul Alam was kind enough to join us on the B&H Photography Podcast to discuss the current exhibit, his career, and the state of photojournalism around the world. Also joining us is scholar, archivist, and the author of Conversations on Conflict Photography, Dr. Lauren Walsh. Truth to Power is the name of the Alam’s exhibition and it is “a tribute to the numerous acts of resistance all across the globe and gives hope to those who continue to believe that a better world is possible.” As the name indicates, Alam’s work confronts the injustices in his native Bangladesh, where he has spent a career photographing natural disasters, social inequalities, street protests, migrant workers, and investigating those murdered or kidnapped. He also founded the Chobi Mela Photography Festival and the Drik and Majority World photo agencies, which have enabled countless photographers a better chance to have their stories seen by a larger audience. In addition to learning about Alam’s career, his 2018 arrest, and his selection as one of Time magazine’s 2018 “Persons of the Year,” we discuss with Walsh and Alam many topics crucial to an understanding of modern photojournalism. We ask about how to shape a visual narrative for maximum effect, about the benefits of including graphic violence in an edit, and how journalists must protect themselves, not just from physical attacks, but from cyber and social media attacks. We also discuss the importance (and the dangers) of local journalists covering their own stories. Join us for this incredibly compelling episode. Guests: Shahidul Alam and Dr. Lauren Walsh Photograph © Shahidul Alam Dhaka Siege Day; Motijheel, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 1987 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy of Drik/Majority World Mural of Noor Hossain in Jahangirnagar University Campus; Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1987 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy of Drik/Majority World Bishwa Ijtema; Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1988 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Woman in Ballot Booth; Lamatia, Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1991 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Smriti Azad at Protest at Shaheed Minar; Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1994 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Airport Goodbye; Dhaka Airport, Bangladesh, 1996 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Climate Refugees; river crossing between Bondor Tila Ghat in Mijhum Dwip and Moktaria Bazar in Hatiya, Bangladesh, 2009 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Sailboat Fishing for Ilish; Daulatdia, Bangladesh, 2001 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Sheep at Sunset; Tibetan Plateau, 1999 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Rohingya Refugees After Having Just Landed in Bangladesh; Teknaf, Bangladesh, 2017 © Shahidul Alam, courtesy Drik/Majority World Shahidul Alam © John Harris Dr. Lauren Walsh © John Harris Shahidul Alam speaks with Allan Weitz on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris John Harris, Allan Weitz, Shahidul Alam, and Lauren Walsh © Jason Tables “Shahidul Alam: Truth to Power” at Rubin Museum of Art © John Harris “Shahidul Alam: Truth to Power” at Rubin Museum of Art © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 12/24/2019
It’s hard to believe that another year of the B&H Photography Podcast is on the books and, as has become our way, we close out the year with a casual conversation about our most memorable episodes from 2019. But before we get started, a recent count showed that we have listeners in all but 15 countries. To us, that’s remarkable, and we’d like to offer a very heartfelt thank you and best wishes for a happy new year to all our listeners around the world. We look forward to your feedback and suggestions for photography conversations in 2020. Allan Weitz starts off today’s show with a few of his favorite 2019 episodes, including our talk with photographer Stephen Mallon, who documented the recovery of Flight 1549 —referred to as the “Miracle on the Hudson”—from the icy waters of the Hudson River after its forced landing in January 2009. On that episode, we welcomed Denise Lockie, a passenger on that flight. Allan also mentions our conversations with Albert Watson and Vince Aletti as favorites, and our chats on car photography with Nate Hassler and on D.I.Y. camera makers. For his part, Jason Tables starts his list with our episode on storm chasing and extreme-weather photography as a favorite. He also recalls “The Copyright Infringement Superhighway” with attorney David Deal, our talk with photographer Corinne May Botz on her series “Milk Factory,” and our hilarious and insightful conversation with portraitist Mark Mann. John Harris begins with some of the 2019 episodes that performed best in terms of number of downloads, some of which surprised us. He also discusses a few of his favorites episodes, including “Conflict Photography—Motivation and Consequence.” Other memorable episodes he mentions are “Commitment to Community—Rhynna Santos, Michael Young, and the Bronx Documentary Center,” our talks with rock photographer Mick Rock and photojournalist Shahidul Alam, and, of course, our conversation with actor and photographer Jeff Bridges. Enjoy our casual end-of-the-year chat, subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on Apple Podcasts, join our Facebook group, and have yourself a happy new year. Photographs © John Harris Allan Weitz, Denise Lockie, Stephen Mallon, 2019 © John Harris Rhynna Santos, 2019 © John Harris Michael Young, 2019 © John Harris Vince Aletti, 2019 © John Harris A.J. Bernstein, Allan Weitz, Orlando Mendez, Norman Blake, 2019 © John Harris Bill Shapiro, 2019 © John Harris Shahidul Alam, 2019 © John Harris Albert Watson, 2019 © John Harris Jeannette Garcia, Allan Weitz, and Yaakov Katz, 2019 © John Harris Santiago Lyon and Anthony Feinstein © Allan Weitz Mitra Saboury, Allan Weitz, Ben Zank, Cory Rice, 2019 © John Harris Petronella Lugemwa and Allan Weitz, 2019 © John Harris Liz Groeschen and Corinne May Botz, 2019 © John Harris Ron Haviv, Allan Weitz, and Dr. Lauren Walsh, 2019 © John Harris Allan Weitz, Monica Lozano, Stefan Falke, 2019 © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 02/05/2020
On the suggestion of a listener, we contacted a few Australian photographers to get their take on the devastating bushfire season that has burned more than 18 million hectares and taken thirty-four lives, since June 2019. We were fortunate to connect with Nick Moir, self-described storm-chaser, wildfire photographer, and current chief photographer at the Sydney Morning Herald. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Moir about his experiences photographing this year’s fires, as well as the overall news coverage of this disaster. Moir won a 2003 World Press Photographers Award for his coverage of that season’s bushfires, so he knows of what he speaks, and we talk with him about his approach to shooting such a dangerous subject, including planning, gear, safety measures, and the type of fire photos he prefers to make. We also discuss with Moir the fire season itself and why this year is so much worse than previous seasons. Finally, we talk about the news coverage of the fires and how his news organization covers the many stories that are part of this disaster, in comparison to how international journalists and news organizations cover the story. Before we speak with Moir, we welcome David Brommer, organizer of the 2020 Depth of Field Professional Portrait, Wedding, and Event Photography Conference, which takes place here in New York and streams online, on February 11 and 12. Join us for this timely conversation. Guests: Nick Moir and David Brommer Photograph © Nick Moir/Sydney Morning Herald Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 02/25/2020
What obstacles have gotten in the way of your photography? When life’s troubles arise, where do you point your camera? Or do you set it down? Photography can be a weekend hobby or it can be a life’s calling and, for our guests on today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, there is no doubt that photography is part of their very being, and meshed into the most intimate aspects of their lives. Adriane Ohanesian and Nancy Borowick have been friends since they studied together at the International Center of Photography, and have remained close despite careers that have put them on opposite sides of the globe. Both had specific aspirations while studying, both have received professional recognition as photographers, and both have faced tragedy and pain with a steady hand and unflinching eye. In addition to her many assignments for the likes of Time magazine and the New York Times, Borowick documented her parent’s parallel treatments for stage-four cancer. And as a photojournalist in East Africa, Ohanesian has covered war, refugee crisis, climate change, and illegal mining. Not only has she witnessed and documented extreme human brutality, she has been caught in the crossfire on more than one occasion. As part of B&H’s content for International Women’s Day, which is on March 8, 2020, we asked Borowick and Ohanesian to join us for a conversation about the role photography has played in their lives and to discuss their careers thus far. For both women, 2019 will be a watershed year—Borowick welcomed her first baby and Ohanesian survived a plane crash that has left her broken but unbowed. After a decade of “the hustle,” they also take a moment to gaze into the future of their photo careers and we are proud to be privy to this conversation and present it to our listeners. Join us for this real-world conversation among two accomplished photographers. Guests: Adriane Ohanesian and Nancy Borowick Adriane Ohanesian and Nancy Borowick at the International Center of Photography, in 2010. Photograph courtesy Nancy Borowick Allan Weitz, Adriane Ohanesian, and Nancy Borowick. Photograph © John Harris Hundreds of women and children who have fled the fighting and are seeking shelter from continued bombing by the Sudanese government's forces live in a cave, in Central Darfur, Sudan, March 2, 2015. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian A young boy looks over the Mahama Refugee Camp that currently houses more than 24,000 people who have fled from Burundi to Rwanda, May 14, 2015. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian Martha helps to bury her six-month-old daughter, in a mass grave for children in the cemetery across the road from the UN base in Bentiu, South Sudan, June 30, 2014. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian Healthcare workers pause for a photo as they finish dressing in their Personal Protective Equipment, at the beginning of the morning shift at the treatment center in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic, in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 5, 2019. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Ebola responders with an armed police escort run with one of two coffins to be buried at the cemetery on a hill in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 6, 2019. The responders have been a frequent target in attacks by community members and militias. Photograph © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal From the “The Family Imprint.” Photograph © Nancy Borowick From the “The Family Imprint.” Photograph © Nancy Borowick From the “The Family Imprint.” Photograph © Nancy Borowick Senator Kristen Gillibrand and family. Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2013 From the “Single Ladies” series. Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2011 From the “Part of the Pack” series. Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2016 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2019 Photograph © Nancy Borowick, 2020 Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 03/03/2020
Shari Belafonte knows cameras from both sides and she brings an understanding to the medium that is as palpable as her sense of humor. It was a pleasure to welcome her to the B&H Photography Podcast. Of course, we knew of Shari as the face from so many magazine covers in the 1980s and ’90s—no kidding, every other face at the check-out line melted away when you saw that smile. Of course, she has the same last name as a 20th-century legend (who just turned 93 this week, by the way), but did not use it at the beginning of her professional life. However, as her modeling career grew, so came television and movie roles, and she is currently a regular on the hit show, The Morning Show. Multi-talented? Yes, and we didn’t even talk about her singing voice, but what we didn’t know was that she went to school to work behind the camera and never really put it down, including stills and motion work over the years. First to admit her modeling career came as a bit of a surprise, Shari Belafonte did have her first professional shoot with none other than Richard Avedon, and that Calvin Klein campaign included a memorable early video component. In that period, she graced the cover of more than 300 magazines, including VOGUE, Jet, and Glamour. We speak with her about learning the modeling craft as she continued to learn the crafts of camera and lighting, working with the likes of Avedon and Francesco Scavullo. We also flash back a bit and talk about growing up the daughter of singer, actor, and civil-rights activist Harry Belafonte, discussing his Leica cameras, the role of photography in their household, dealing with the press and paparazzi, and a few of the famous shots of her father with his friend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Shari had her first camera at age four and generally spent high school and college in the darkroom before modeling and acting took over. Later, a well-timed gift of the then-new Canon EOS camera reignited her passion for making images and she continued, exhibiting several series of work over the years, shooting stills and BTS on films, even learning Steadi-Cam and “dp’ing” on music videos and shorts. We talk technique, interaction with talent, post-production, and about the power and beauty of creating a “moment in time.” Join us. Guest: Shari Belafonte From “MYTHOSTORIES,” Photograph © Shari Belafonte Delizia Danza, Photograph © Shari Belafonte Photograph © Shari Belafonte From “MYTHOSTORIES,” Photograph © Shari Belafonte Carl Cox, Photograph © Shari Belafonte From “MYTHOSTORIES,” Photograph © Shari Belafonte Photograph © Shari Belafonte Rush Hour in Havana, Photograph © Shari Belafonte Photograph © Shari Belafonte Photograph © Shari Belafonte Photograph © Shari Belafonte VOGUE cover, 1983. Courtesy Shari Belafonte Harry Belafonte and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Courtesy Shari Belafonte Allan Weitz and Shari Belafonte © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
1 — 11 of 23 items

Pages

Close

Close

Close