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Posted 10/21/2015
B &H Photo Video is proud to present the B&H Photography Podcast, a weekly conversation about all things photography. With insightful and entertaining guests, we discuss the issues most important to the contemporary photographer. From drones and cult cameras to Instagram and photo history and, of course, the latest in new gear, our host, Allan Weitz and an outstanding lineup of guests bring you a lively conversation you’ll look forward to hearing and sharing. Our debut episode brings together the former director of photography at New York magazine, Jordan Schaps and photographer/filmmaker An Rong, who contributes regularly to The New York Times, to discuss how to get your work noticed and, more important, how to build and sustain a photo career in today’s rapidly evolving marketplace. With experience, humor and straight-up good advice, Jordan Schaps shares from his years of experience and An Rong’s first-hand anecdotes go a long way to show just what it takes to make it in our “new” photography environment.  To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes; Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. We’d love to hear your feedback! Please drop us a line podcast@bhphoto.com Photos by A n Rong Xu
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Posted 11/18/2015
Have you ever shot film?  Do you still shoot film? Does it make a difference in your work? Is your work defined by it? This episode of the B&H Photography Podcast addresses an issue that is still at the heart of photography—does the medium you choose affect the way you work and, ultimately, the images you produce?  With the recent release of his book, From Darkroom to Daylight, we will talk with photographer Harvey Wang and with writer and photographer Todd Vorenkamp about the differences between shooting film and shooting digital images. From the perspectives of those who grew up shooting film and those who did not, we’ll discuss working process, technological developments, quality of images and yes—nostalgia. Wang will also recount from his book conversations on this subject with legendary photographers such as Eugene Richards, Elliott Erwitt, Sally Mann, and George Tice. Guests: Harvey Wang and Todd Vorenkamp To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS.   Alfred Gescheidt, 2011 Sally Mann, 2012 Steven Sasson, 2009 Photos by Harvey Wang    Photos by Todd Vorenkamp b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 02/03/2016
Despite poking a little fun with this episode’s title, we are big fans of photography websites and camera blogs, and if you are reading this, you probably are, too. On this week’s podcast, we are fortunate to have Kevin Raber and Jason Hermann, proprietors of Luminous Landscape and SonyAlphaLab, respectively. Have you ever wondered how sites like these operate, are funded, get gear to review and deal with the, shall we say “experts,” who populate the comment sections? In this very animated, on-point conversation, Raber and Hermann talk specifically about their sites, the proliferation of gear chat, and the camera industry in general. Guests: Kevin Raber and Jason Hermann To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS.   Photos by  Kevin Raber   Photos by Jason Hermann b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 03/17/2016
For many, photography is a solitary endeavor. We enjoy the time alone or the one-on-one interaction with a subject, but how do we improve our skill set and network with others when we only have our “inner Ansel” from which to bounce ideas and techniques? A photography workshop is the answer for many, and there is a wide range of choices when it comes to workshops, from weekend get-togethers on specific disciplines to intensive courses to overseas adventures. Our guests represent two well-known workshops and detail the distinctions between their organizations and other available options. In between the laughs our host provides, we discuss changes in the photo industry that have affected the workshop business and factors to consider if you are thinking about attending a workshop. Guests: Alyssa Adams and Mirjam Evers  To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS.   Nightly editing session at EAW   The navy team prepares for its final presentation   Twelve Pulitzer Prize winners gather at the 2015 Eddie Adams Workshop   Eddie Adams at work February, 1966 Photos courtesy eddieadamsworkshop.com Morroco, Photograph by Amelia Trevitt Finland, Photograph by Allison Gershin Morocco, Photograph by Bryan Busovicki Argentina, Photograph courtesy PhotoQuest Adventure Photos courtesy  photoquestadventures.com b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 05/13/2016
Some days, I love my job, and this was most definitely one of those days. We were in a room of heroes, not just heroes of mine, but actual heroes, people who fill their lives, risk their lives, for passion and for the betterment of humanity. The gathering was called “The Pulitzer Prize Photographers,” held in celebration of the centennial of the establishment of the Pulitzer Prize and organized by the Eddie Adams Workshop, the Parsons School of Design, and supported, in part, by B&H Photo. It brought together Pulitzer-Prize-winning photographers from six decades, displayed their history lesson of potent journalism, and gave time and space for their stories to be told. At times, emotion filled the auditorium, tears were shed, but by the end of the night, there was joy—Nick Ut hamming it up in the photo booth, Adrees Latif and Ruth Fremson pressing limes for margaritas at the after-party. I shook hands with Robert Jackson, who captured the shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald, and thanked Daniel Berehulak—he risked his life to document the Ebola plague in West Africa, and in doing so, helped bring to an earlier end that horrible epidemic. Nancy Borowick, who chronicled her parent’s illnesses and deaths, seemed endearingly unaware of her might, and John White brought a smile to many faces, reminding us that as photographers we are “visual servants.” This episode of our podcast will do its best to bring you to this event, to share moments of insight from the speakers and provide a sense of the evening’s activities. Even if photojournalism is not your primary interest, enjoy, be moved, and be inspired by the experience and wisdom put forth at this gathering of greats. To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; Google Play; or via  RSS. Seat placement for 2016 Pulitzer winner Jessica Rinaldi, at the New School’s Tishman Auditorium Seat Placement for past Pulitzer Prize winners Nick Ut and Greg Marinovich John White addresses a student during the Q/A session Robert Jackson discusses his photography, including this photo of the mother and wife of Lee Harvey Oswald Ruth Fremson talks of her experience at the Eddie Adams Workshop Pulitzer Prize-winning photographers enjoy the photo booth at the Bath House Studios after-party A party-goer takes a selfie with Photographer Nick Ut Photographers Michelle Agins and John White pose for Cliff Hausner Photographs © John R Harris  b Sponsorship for the event was provided by Nikon, Inc. and B&H Photo.  The program was organized by the Eddie Adams Workshop in collaboration and partnership with Parson School of Design at The New School. Supporters include the Associated Press, Hal Buell Associates with encouragement from The Pulitzer Centennial Committee. Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 05/19/2016
The Pulitzer Prizes for Feature and for Breaking News Photography are the highest honors that a photojournalist can receive and, between our two guests, they have won four.  Martha Rial won the award for her coverage of Rwandan refugees returning home after fleeing genocide, and Ruth Fremson has won the award for her team coverage of the Bill Clinton impeachment process and for coverage of the 9/11 attacks in New York and of Pakistan and Afghanistan in the months after September, 2001. Both photographers join us to discuss how the Pulitzer Prize affected their lives and careers. We talk about the assignments that earned them their honors, the process of submission, how they were notified of their awards, and how winning the awards and forever being known as a “Pulitzer Prize- winning photographer” changed their assignments and the direction of their work. Join us for this enjoyable conversation with two tremendously talented photographers who have been firsthand witnesses to our shared history. Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play. Martha Rial, Allan Weitz, Ruth Fremson See more of Martha Rial's photographs here.  See more of Ruth Fremson's photographs here.  b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 11/14/2016
The B&H Photography Podcast was very fortunate to be invited to the 29th Eddie Adams Workshop this year. The annual workshop, officially sponsored by Nikon, with support from B&H, is a unique and inspiring event, bringing together 100 young photographers with some of the world’s most recognized photojournalists and editors, including thirteen Pulitzer Prize winners, for four intense days of photographic presentation and collaboration. On today’s podcast, we discuss editing for newspapers and news sites and the working relationship between photojournalists and their editors. In the first half of the episode, we speak with Nancy Andrews, the former Director of Photography at The Detroit Free Press and current Ogden Visiting Professor for Media Innovation, Reed College of Media at West Virginia University, and Colin Crawford, the Deputy Managing Editor of Visual Journalism at the Los Angeles Times. Both started as photojournalists and we chat about the differences between photographers and editors, but we concentrate our talk on how an editor can guide a photographer to improve their work. After a short break, we resume with Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Michael Williamson and MaryAnne Golon, Assistant Managing Editor and Director of Photography at the Washington Post. In addition to being colleagues, Williamson and Golon are old friends, and we discuss the working relationship between a photographer and an editor and how collaboration brings concept to completed series. Guests: Nancy Andrews, Colin Crawford, Michael Williamson, MaryAnne Golon Colin Crawford leads an editing session of students at Eddie Adams Workshop. Michael Williamson leads a discussion of students on the hill at the Eddie Adams Workshop.   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/02/2016
On this week’s episode, we return to our roots—and not just our photographic roots—but we return to our podcast’s original design of chatting about photography among B&H photographers and writers. We welcome back an original co-host of the podcast, Todd Vorenkamp, as we discuss the basics of photography—the control of light through aperture, shutter speed, and ISO sensitivity. Yes, this episode could be considered a Photo 101 course, and for those who are new to photography (or new to manual control of your imaging) this episode should be very helpful. We walk through the core concepts of how to expose your images to get the look you want and try to clarify the sometimes confusing nomenclature and camera settings. We talk depth of field, diffraction, motion blur, digital noise, “Sunny 16,” and the necessary balance between aperture, shutter speed, and ISO that is required for proper exposure. Photo veterans should tune in, too, because our conversation is by photographers for photographers, and will provide insights and anecdotes that may even improve your skills. Guest: Todd Vorenkamp Shallow depth of field can be created by opening up your lens to its maximum aperture.         John Harris High ISO settings enable sharp imaging in low light but can also produce “noise,” apparent in the sky. John Harris Even a shutter speed of less than 1 second can create blur or, in this case, a short light trail.     John Harris Utilizing a 30 second exposure with tripod, low ISO and a small (f/22) aperture, long light trails and intentional blur are created. An auto white balance setting facilitates the proper rendition of the many different color temperatures in this frame. Jason Tables   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/30/2017
Many photographers begin their careers wanting to “make a difference” with their photography, to bring some good to the world, or at least to the people they photograph. It’s one of the greatest aspects of the craft and its adherents, but can a photo really bring about long-term change? This is an increasingly relevant question, and one that dogs even the most experienced and socially conscious photographers. Despite this dilemma, many photographers forge ahead, shining a light on horrors and glories with the hope that their images have a positive influence and perhaps, because of this dilemma, some photographers have found ways to use their art, labor, contacts, experiences, and insight to raise money specifically for organizations that are “making a difference.” Salem Krieger is an experienced editorial and portrait photographer who had a seemingly simple realization in 2015: he could sell prints of his work and give a portion of the revenue to a non-profit organization of his choice. From this grew Art is Helping, his system for putting artists and art buyers together and letting the buyers determine how much they spend and which organization they support. In a short time, the roster of artists has grown, as has the varied list of non-profits that benefit from the transactions. Alison Wright is an accomplished documentary photographer and author whose work has taken her to every corner of the world. Her latest book,  Human Tribe,  is available through Amazon and Barnes & Noble. In 2000, a tragic, near-death accident on a jungle road in Laos and a remarkable story of heroism and recovery brought a heightened perspective to the strength and spirit that pushes people to help one another—even to risk their lives to help complete strangers. With the resolve and empathy born from suffering, Wright rebuilt her life and career and founded Faces of Hope, a fund that provides medical care and education, especially to women and children in crisis around the world. The first act of Faces of Hope was to return to the village in Laos—and the people who saved her life—with five doctors and $10,000 worth of medical supplies. We speak with these two photographers about their work and about the mechanisms they have created to bring assistance to those who need it, while continuing to do the photography they love. Guests: Alison Wright and Salem Krieger “Tibet Girl” 2005. Photograph by Alison Wright Malagan Ceremonial Mask, Papua New Guinea, 2010. Photograph by Alison Wright Cover of Alison Wright’s latest book, “Human Tribe” “NYC News Stand” by Salem Krieger, from Art is Helping “42nd St. Alien” by Antonio Mari, from Art is Helping “Shadows” by Cynthia Karalla, from Art is Helping “VSH #4” by Julie Gross, from Art is Helping “Beetle” by Jose Maximiliano Sinani Paredes Shezchez, from Art is Helping “Auto America: New Mexico” by Salem Krieger, from Art is Helping Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/01/2017
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we continue our exploration of photographic collaboration with photojournalists Ben Lowy and Marvi Lacar. In addition to sharing a vocation, they also share two children and a life together. Photojournalism is a decidedly independent, at times dangerous, career, certainly not one known for a routine home life, but when domestic responsibilities and children enter the picture, how does a couple balance craft and career with the need to earn a living and the time needed to nurture relationships? More so, when both people are working in the same field, how does bolstering one career cross the line into debilitating the other and how do the individuals comprising a creative couple find ways to support each other’s efforts? Lowy and Lacar bring an animated humor and a willingness to talk about the difficult moments from their lives and careers, and explain how they have come to recognize their best personal and professional attributes, bringing those strengths into a working relationship that continues to evolve. Guests: Marvi Lacar and Ben Lowy From the series "Melting Pot," Marvi Lacar From the series "Melting Pot," Marvi Lacar From the series "U.S. Bases," Marvi Lacar From the series "U.S. Bases," Marvi Lacar From “This Is a Love Story,” Marvi Lacar From “This Is a Love Story,” Marvi Lacar 2004 Democratic National Convention, Ben Lowy Protest at 2004 Republican National Convention, Ben Lowy Iraq Perspectives #1, Ben Lowy Iraq perspectives, #2, Ben Lowy Wounded soldier, Iraq, Ben Lowy Ski Jumper, Sochi, 2014, Ben Lowy Speed Skater, Sochi, 2014, Ben Lowy Great White Shark, 2016, Ben Lowy Seal, 2016, Ben Lowy Ben Lowy and Marvi Lacar at B&H Photography Podcast, John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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