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Posted 01/21/2016
Anyone, I mean, anyone can submit their photos for sale in the stock-photography market. (Are you a foaper?) But the question remains: is it worth it? No doubt, the industry has been transformed by corporate conglomeration and digital technology but, while some decry the devaluation of the image, others see huge opportunity and a bright future. Join us as industry expert Paul Melcher and former Getty executive and now independent photographer and boutique agency owner Rana Faure relate their experiences in the stock-photo business. We’ll ask them to explain the various types of agencies, what makes a good stock shot, and we’ll get to the truth behind the myth of the “lottery” photo. Guests: Rana Faure and Paul Melcher To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. Photographs by Rana Faure, Mother Image.  ranafaure.com Screenshot from Thoughts of a Bohemian melchersystem.com Screenshot from kaptur.co b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 03/03/2016
We run a little long on this episode, but when you have guests of this caliber, it’s well worth the extra time. Today we welcome the legendary Associated Press Photo Editor Hal Buell and Time LightBox Photo Editor Olivier Laurent. Bringing distinctive cultural and generational perspectives to the table, our two guests discuss the idea of an iconic photograph. We start with an attempt to define an iconic photo and, along the way, we talk about the editing process, war photography, mobile technology, photo manipulation, important photos from 2015 and many, many of the greatest photos ever taken. For working professionals, photo historians and anyone interested in how photography impacts our life, this is an episode for you.    Guests: Hal Buell and Olivier Laurent To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. Hal Buell and AP staffer Jim Palmer work with Leafax transmitter at the Atlanta Democratic National Political Convention in 1988. It was the first time digital scanning was used on a major news story. Hal Buell edits film at the Los Angles 1984 Olympic games. Hal Buell, far left, poses with other judges at a World Press Photo session in Amsterdam in the early 1960s. Hal Buell, Allan Weitz, Olivier Laurent, and John Harris b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 01/06/2017
On today’s episode, we welcome Katrin Eismann and Peter Krogh to our studio and, with a chance to speak to the “Photoshop Diva” and the man who wrote The DAM Book, you count your lucky stars and soak up as much insight from these experts as possible. Peter Krogh is a photographer, writer, consultant, and a foremost authority on digital asset management and workflow. His clients include top-tier photographers and the Library of Congress; he has served on the ASMP Board of Directors. A recent collaboration with PhotoShelter produced its Libris cloud-based asset management system, and his latest book is Organizing Your Photos with Lightroom. Katrin Eismann is a member of the Photoshop Hall of Fame, an Adobe MAX Master, and a Sony Artisan. She is founder and Chair of the Masters in Digital Photography Program at the School of Visual Arts and the author or co-author of several books, including Photoshop Masking & Compositing, The Creative Digital Darkroom, Photoshop: Restoration and Retouching and Real World Digital Photography. Our guests walk us through their capture and post-process workflow and we talk best practices for image management and storage. The conversation gets theoretical before we bring it back to the pragmatic with specific questions about noise reduction, curves, levels, and general Lightroom and Photoshop applications. Guests:  Katrin Eismann and Peter Krogh Katrin Eismann       Peter Krogh Peter Krogh, Allan Weitz, and Katrin Eismann DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/12/2017
A simple twist of fate (OK, I clicked a link) introduced me to the wedding photography of Jide Alakija and I immediately knew he should be a guest on the podcast. His work falls into the category of documentary wedding photography, but the intimate connection he seems to make with his subjects, as well as his compositional skills, place his work above the popular trend of fly-on-the-wall work. He captures moments of humor, tenderness, and joy that many photographers would miss, but still fills a frame the way Grandma wants the photos on her mantel to look. We talk about his composition decisions and shooting techniques, but we also wanted him on the show because his work brings him to many different countries and cultures. With this in mind, we take on numerous aspects of traveling to shoot a wedding, whether that is a "destination" wedding or simply being invited to shoot a wedding far from home. Our conversation includes the practical side of travel—what gear to bring, who to hire as an assistant, how to budget—but we also discuss the intricacies of working in a locale where you are not familiar with the cultural traditions and may not even speak the language. Join us for a lively chat with our new friend, Jide Alakija. Guest: Jide Alakija Jide Alakija and Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next All Photographs by Jide Alakija DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/07/2017
We return to OPTIC 2017 this week for two wonderful conversations with photographers who ply their trade on the road. First, we speak with Jonathan Irish, who, along with his partner, Stefanie Payne, spent 2016 crisscrossing the country in an Airstream trailer on an epic quest to photograph all 59 U.S. National Parks. They succeeded, and have branded their adventure The Greatest American Roadtrip. Irish discusses the planning it took to reach all of the parks, dividing the workload, the sponsorship they received, and the photographic aspect of the journey, trying to capture the legendary landmarks, as well as the off-the-beaten-path locales of each park. Jillian Mann and Kyla Trethewey are Our Wild Abandon and they, too, cruise the country in a trailer, but their journey started four years ago and has no end point—yet. Like most great road trips, theirs started with a need to just get away (from their native Vancouver) and, as often goes, they suffered early setbacks, including a roll-over accident and visa complications. They persisted and not only have documented their experiences, but have developed successful photo careers along the way. Their journey was not initially a photographic exercise, but we speak with them about how their Instagram feed grew and became a method to raise funds, eventually including branded content, and how they made the transition to commissioned assignments and agency representation, while still living on the road. After a break, we continue with our serial, “Dispatch,” with Adriane Ohanesian. Ohanesian discusses her attempt to return to South Sudan, new approaches to fund long-terms stories that surpass “most horrific image competitions,” assignments in Nairobi and Congo, and an update on the plight of four-year-old Mohamed, who is stuck in Kenya, trying to reunite with his mother in the United States. Guests: Jonathan Irish, Jillian Mann, Kyla Trethewey and Adriane Ohanesian Click here if you missed Episode 2 of “Dispatch.” Badlands National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Death Valley National Park, Photograph by Stefanie Payne Saguaro National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Grand Canyon National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Grand Canyon National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Redwoods National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Glacier Bay National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Joshua Tree National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/08/2017
The title “The Falling Man” has been acknowledged as the name of the photograph of a man falling from the north tower of the World Trade Center during the attacks of September 11, 2001. The image depicts a lone figure falling headfirst against the backdrop of the vertical lines of the twin towers. As an image, it is a striking composition and the casual position of the man’s body bisecting the two towers, has even been described as graceful. These visual elements mask the horror of its immediate context and perhaps add to the upsetting response that often accompanies this image. Unlike other photographs from that day, this image does not explicitly depict carnage and destruction, but it is this image that has been often singled-out as too disturbing to view, too galling to publish. In fact, the image was published by many newspapers on the day following the attacks and was received with such recoil that editors were called to apologize for its inclusion and almost immediately, it fell under a shroud of obscurity, which in the sixteen years since 9/11, has been slowly lifted. On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome veteran Associated Press photojournalist Richard Drew who took this now iconic photograph. We talk with Drew about his experiences on September 11, 2001, about media self-censorship and about how this photo, which is simultaneously peaceful and deeply painful, had been received, rejected and perhaps now, accepted as part of the whole story and a symbol of all that was lost that day. Guest: Richard Drew Editor’s Note: We have decided to not use “The Falling Man” photograph in our blog post because of its painful depiction, but we feel the conversation we hold has educational, emotional and historical value, especially as we approach the sixteenth anniversary of 9/11. We produced it and present it with the utmost of respect for those whose lives has been affected by the attacks of September 11, 2001, particularly the survivors, the victims and their families, the first-responders and the journalists, who also risked their lives that horrible morning. Assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, Los Angeles, 1968. Photograph: Richard Drew Assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, Los Angeles, 1968. Photograph: Richard Drew Muhammad Ali watches as defending world champion George Foreman goes down to the canvas in the eighth round of their WBA/WBC championship match in Kinshasa, Zaire, on October 30, 1974. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Frank Sinatra escorts Jackie Onassis to the '21' Club on September 17, 1975 after she attended his concert at the Uris theater (AP Photo/Richard Drew) President Richard Nixon attends a baseball game at Yankee Stadium after his term in office (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Andy Warhol (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Texas billionaire Ross Perot laughs in response to reporters asking when he plans to formally enter the Presidential race. New York City, May 5, 1992 (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Britain’s Prince Charles, during a charity polo match in Mexico City’s Chapultepec Park. February 17, 1993 (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Cuban President Fidel Castro at a special commemorative meeting of the U.N. General Assembly, October 22, 1995. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Specialist Anthony Rinaldi is reflected in a screen at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, April 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Richard Drew at the B&H Photography Podcast. Photograph: John Harris Allan Weitz and Richard Drew. Photograph: John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/28/2017
If inspiration is what you are looking for, the story of how Eric Kruszewski became a photographer should supply you with plenty of it. Of course, it all starts with a personal desire but, planning, networking, hard work, and even a simple Google search like the eponymic one above, all go into the recipe for success. Photographs © Eric Kruszewski Taking up photography as a hobby in your thirties seems a commonplace occurrence, but deciding to change careers and become a working photographer is another story altogether. Join us as we speak with travel, editorial, and documentary photographer Eric Kruszewski about his journey from newbie to National Geographic. We talk about the value of workshops, mentors, cold calls, and persistence, and trace Eric’s career from its inauspicious beginnings through long-term personal projects, one-off jobs, artistic setbacks, learning new skills and, ultimately, a satisfying career—paying the bills by doing what he loves. Guest: Eric Kruszewski At India’s Jaisalmer Fort, a street performer walks a tightrope in a unique way—on her knees (with a metal plate) while pushing herself along only with her toes and balancing a vase of water on her head. Cowboys from across America gather at the Pendleton Roundup to prepare for its annual rodeo. From the series, “American Rodeo.” It is quite common that families travel together with the Davis Carnival. In camp, one woman observes her neighbors—a mother and daughter—through the window. From the series, “Behind the Ferris Wheel.” Richmond Shepard, a mime based in New York City, poses for a portrait in his studio. During the annual Military Tattoo in Edinburgh, Scotland, a motorcycle stunt driver takes off amongst fireworks. The performance is held for about three weeks, with the Edinburgh Castle as a backdrop. A woman walks through a mirror maze, part of the Camera Obscura and World of Illusions exhibits in Edinburgh's Old Town. Chris Turner poses for a portrait in his childhood neighborhood of Northeast Washington, D.C. Chris was one of several people accused of the murder of Catherine Fuller in 1984. He served 26 years in prison and maintains his innocence. At the Elephant Conservation Center in Laos, a mahout (elephant trainer) jumps between two elephants. He stuck the landing. Andreas Georgiou, a Greek economist, poses for a portrait in his United States home A young girl dons a costume inside the Angkor Wat Temple in Cambodia. She dresses in costume to pose for photos with visitors. Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/04/2017
Steve Simon is The Passionate Photographer, and in the short conversation we had with him at the 2017 OPTIC Conference, it became clear why. Not only does he exude a passion for photography (and for cameras) but his photographs are imbued with humanity, humor, a wonderful sense of composition, and his talent for capturing the decisive moment. Whether it is street photography, long-form documentary or his wonderful news coverage of presidential campaigns and conventions, his passion is on display. We talk with Simon about a range of subjects, including his first cameras, his popular workshops, and what motivates him to keep shooting. After a break, we return with the fifth installment of our series “Dispatch with Adriane Ohanesian.” In this segment, she recounts her harrowing story of coming under attack while photographing a story on illegal gold mining in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Ohanesian is an award-winning photojournalist, based in Kenya, who covers humanitarian crisis and conflict in South Sudan and Somalia. On this assignment, she had hiked deep into the Okapi Wildlife Reserve with rangers returning to a gold mine that had been cleared of illegal mining, only to be attacked by militia members looking to reclaim their site. Her incredible story involves hiding overnight in a mine pit within earshot of her attackers, fleeing barefoot through the jungle, only to get lost and returned to the mine she had hoped to escape. Join us for this bracing episode, which demonstrates what passionate photographers will do to tell a story worth telling.  Click here  if you missed Episode 4 of “Dispatch.” Guests: Steve Simon and Adriane Ohanesian Photojournalist Adriane Ohanesian at work in the Okapi Wildlife Reserve Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/23/2018
If you follow photography industry news, two words that may have caught your attention recently are “Kodak” and “cryptocurrency,” and the fact that they were in the same sentence might just have caused you to sit up and click. There was an outburst of opinion filling the blogosphere after the January announcement that KODAK and WENN Digital had entered into a brand-licensing agreement to launch KODAKOne, an image rights management platform, and KODAKCoin, a photo-centric cryptocurrency. The worlds of cryptocurrency and blockchain, the distributed ledger technology supporting many cryptocurrencies, are arcane, but merging one of the most recognized brands in photography with these new platforms and adding into the mix a potential fix for the image licensing business brought not only a lot of opinion, but a good deal of confusion. On this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we hope to clear the air and to do so we sit with the principals behind KodakOne and experts on both blockchain technology and image-rights licensing. We welcome Jan Denecke, the CEO of KODAKOne, and Volker Brendel, their CTO, to this discussion. We are also joined by attorney Andrew Hinkes, a professor at New York University and author of more than twenty articles on blockchain technologies and virtual currency, and Maria Kessler, the former president of Digital Media Licensing Association and an expert in stock photography and digital-image licensing. Join us for this rousing conversation in which we get firsthand information on KODAKOne’s business plans, insight on how the blockchain will affect photographer’s interests, and a general sense of what we can buy with a KODAKCoin. Guests: Jan Denecke, Volker Brendel, Andrew Hinkes, and Maria Kessler Jan Denecke, Volker Brendel, Maria Kessler, Philipp Kohn, Allan Weitz, Jason Tables John Harris DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/25/2018
What makes a photographer follow their moral compass and photograph the stories they feel need to be told, no matter what the personal costs? Furthermore, how do they do so without the support of a news outlet or even an agency to distribute that work? And then, what if they decide to shoot primarily with black-and-white film?! On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Greg Constantine, who made and continues to make these decisions. In this affable conversation, we find out what prompted Constantine to pick up a camera and how he made the subject of “statelessness” a recurring theme in his work. We also learn why he continued to shoot film, even after digital became the more affordable and accepted format, and why the more established route of assignments for news outlets was not the best path for his storytelling. We also discuss the financing of his work through a combination of grants, commissions, and out-of-pocket spending, the obstacles to exhibiting documentary photography and, ultimately, the satisfaction of seeing the positive impact his work has had. As mentioned, much of Constantine’s work documents oppressed communities, and he has lived and traveled extensively in Asia and, more recently in Europe, to follow stories of migration and persecution. Specifically, he has worked in Burma with the Rohingya people, with the Nubians in Kenya, and with communities around the world that live without the basic right of citizenship. His current project, Seven Doors, has brought him back to his home country to document stories on immigration detention. Constantine’s work ultimately did make it into well-recognized newspapers. He has published books and won awards, and his work has been exhibited in the halls of the U.S. Capitol Building, but he continues to press forward—guided not by credit lines, but by the desire to grow as a photographer, to be inspired by the people he photographs, and to tell the stories that demand to be told. Join us for this inspiring conversation. Guest: Greg Constantine Kenya, 2008, from “Nowhere People” © Greg Constantine Kuwait, 2011, from “Nowhere People” © Greg Constantine Italy, 2014, from “Nowhere People” © Greg Constantine Iraq, 2014, from “Nowhere People” © Greg Constantine Bangladesh, 2017, from “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” © Greg Constantine Bangladesh, 2017, from “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” © Greg Constantine Bangladesh, 2017, from “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” © Greg Constantine Bangladesh, 2017, from “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” © Greg Constantine United States, 2018, from “Seven Doors” © Greg Constantine United States, 2018, from “Seven Doors” © Greg Constantine United States, 2018, from “Seven Doors” © Greg Constantine Malaysia, 2017, from “Seven Doors” © Greg Constantine Greg Constantine on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Allan Weitz and Greg Constantine © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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