Don’t Miss an Episode Subscribe Now

Refine
Done
0 Plays
Posted 01/06/2016
My apologies for the personal question, but we all suffer from Gear Acquisition Syndrome in one form or another, and it’s good to talk about it, especially if it aids in recovery. With Gabe Biderman and Todd Vorenkamp, we will discuss camera cycles from the digital and analog eras, talk new technology and try to understand why there is so much camera stuff to buy nowadays. Who is to blame for G.A.S.? The camera manufacturers, the retailers, the blogs, China!? Or could it be that imaging technology has improved so much in the past few years to truly warrant this welcomed illness? Either way, our guests will commiserate with your suffering and even provide a few simple cures for what ails you. Join us for an enlightening and entertaining conversation. Co-hosts: Todd Vorenkamp and John Harris Guests: Gabriel Biderman To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. Todd Vorenkamp (left) and Gabriel Biderman b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
0 Plays
Posted 02/24/2016
In the past few weeks, Canon and Nikon have announced their latest flagship DSLR cameras, the Nikon D5 and the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II. Our expert guests, Levi Tenenbaum and Shawn Steiner, have had a chance to play with these new models, and join us to report on their findings. In general, we talk upgraded specs and what differentiates these cameras from their predecessors and from each other. We take time to talk about their video capabilities and get into the bigger issues of who will find these cameras appealing, are they worth the upgrade, and what the future may hold for the DSLR form factor. This is a straightforward and informative discussion about the best cameras available today. Guests: Levi Tenenbaum and Shawn Steiner To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS.         Nikon D5 Canon 1Dx Mark II   b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
0 Plays
Posted 06/03/2016
Today we talk gear! In this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we invite two respected members of the B&H team to tell us which one camera offers them all they would ever want from a camera. Well, not exactly, but Christina Smith and Andrea Ortado do provide us with much to consider when we go on this hypothetical journey to find your “desert island” camera. Would it be full frame, have interchangeable lenses (but which one lens), would it be rugged and waterproof, be blazing fast or ultra-high resolution? How about high ISO or touch screen or an optical view finder? These are some of the questions we ask as we move toward the conclusion of our episode, when we each reveal which one camera we would choose if we had only one camera to use. Guests: Christina Smith and Andrea Ortado Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play.  Some of the cameras discussed in the episode. Which would be your one camera?   b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
0 Plays
Posted 06/23/2016
With deference to Linda Richman, today’s podcast offers its version of the Coffee Talk skit from Saturday Night Live —Fujifilm is for Artists/Sony is for Pros… discuss! We realize, of course, that any camera—used well—can be for professionals and for artists and that artists can be pros and vice versa; we’re not so naïve as to think otherwise. Given the parameters of the topic, however, we take on this idea in an open conversation that touches upon the marketing for these high-end mirrorless cameras, the empirical evidence on who is using them, and most important, the feature sets, lenses, and system accessories for these cameras. Three of our most trusted in-house experts join us to discuss their experiences with the Sony a7 series and the Fujifilm X series cameras as we attempt to clarify the most appropriate applications for each camera line. Now, I’m getting verklempt … so talk amongst yourselves. Guests: Shawn Steiner, Justin Dise, Todd Vorenkamp   Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play. Todd Vorenkamp, Allan Weitz, Shawn Steiner and Justin Dise b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 10/06/2016
Photokina is the world’s largest trade fair for photography, and this year’s affair saw 983 exhibitors from 42 countries fill the Koelnmesse Exhibition Centre in Cologne, Germany, with an array of new gear for photography, video, and imaging, in all its forms. Today’s episode of the podcast will offer an overview of the notable cameras and photo equipment announced at this biennial event, held from September 20-25, with a special emphasis on new lenses. Our guests, podcast regulars Levi Tenenbaum and Andrea Ortado, highlight the features of new cameras from Fujifilm, Leica, Olympus, and others, and offer their opinions on a range of new gear. As mentioned, we take an extra moment to talk lenses and ask, “What can we expect from new lens technology in the coming years?” For gearheads, GASsers, and anyone interested in the latest photo equipment, this is an entertaining episode packed with practical information. Guests: Andrea Ortado and Levi Tenenbaum Andrea Ortado, Levi Tenenbaum, and Allan Weitz Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play         Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 12/22/2016
Join us as we talk with two of our most regular and reliable guests about new cameras that were announced in 2016. We hesitate to use the phrase “best” cameras of the year because there a few cameras that we’re not all that crazy about, and a few we can only judge based on their announced specs, but there is plenty to talk about. Shawn Steiner and Levi Tenenbaum test and review cameras for the B&H Explora blog, and bring to this conversation not only extensive product knowledge, but a practical sense of which camera is right for specific photographers and applications. We discuss the new mirrorless medium format cameras announced by Fujifilm and Hasselblad, as well as several new DSLRs and mirrorless cameras, some the first from their respective manufacturers. We also mention a few favorite cameras sent in by listeners (see if you can tell which one we made up), talk industry trends and wrap up the show with a grab bag of favorite accessories. Guests: Levi Tenenbaum and Shawn Steiner Levi Tenenbaum, Shawn Steiner, Allan Weitz   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 06/02/2017
It’s a short week here at the B&H Photography Podcast, so we thought we’d take care of some cleaning that we have put off all winter. Unless one is a full-time pro or serious enthusiast, most of one’s photography is done in the fairer months of spring and summer, whether that be on family vacations, at sporting events, weekend picnics, or just working out that macro lens in the garden. So, it’s time to pull the camera bag from the closet and give our gear a quick once-over to make sure everything is in working order. In this episode, we discuss little ways to maintain cameras and lenses, and things to do to prepare them for the shooting season. From firmware upgrades to mode settings to dust and grease removal, there is a lot you can do in a short time to better understand your camera and to keep it functioning smoothly. In the second half of the show, we continue our serial “Dispatch,” with Adriane Ohanesian. This ongoing segment takes an inside look at the life and work of a freelance photojournalist working in East Africa. In this episode, Ohanesian updates us on her coverage of the conflict in Somalia as she spends time embedded with African Union troops and travels north, to photograph the effects of the ongoing drought in Puntland. She discusses being contracted by the International Rescue Committee to document the refugees “flowing” from war-torn South Sudan to settlement camps in Uganda and, finally, analyzes the risks and expenses freelance photographers take on while working in conflict zones—and the often adverse objectives of news organizations and NGOs. Guests: Todd Vorenkamp and Adriane Ohanesian Click here if you missed Episode 1 of "Dispatch." Photographs © Adriane Ohanesian Mohamed Abdi Bare, age 4, stares at the line of people inside of the waiting area at the Department of Refugee Affairs office in Shauri Moyo, Nairobi, Kenya, January, 2017. Ugandan African Union armored personnel carriers at dusk along the Afgooye road outside of Mogadishu, Somalia, February, 2017. The Ugandan African Union Special Forces wait inside of an armored personnel carrier during a night patrol in Mogadishu, Somalia, February, 2017. The shelters of nearly 400 pastoralists families who have lost a majority of their livestock due to drought, have set up camp along the road in search of food and water in Uusgure, Puntland, Somalia, February, 2017. Severely malnourished, Farhiyah, age 2, lies on the floor of her family’s hut where she stays with her three siblings and mother who came to the area in search of food and water in Uusgure, Puntland, Somalia, February, 2017. The remains of dead goats lie next to the road in Puntland, Somalia, February, 2017. South Sudanese gather to collect their belongings that were transported to the Imvepi settlement for South Sudanese refugees who have fled to northern Uganda. March, 2017. Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 06/30/2017
Many photographers begin their careers wanting to “make a difference” with their photography, to bring some good to the world, or at least to the people they photograph. It’s one of the greatest aspects of the craft and its adherents, but can a photo really bring about long-term change? This is an increasingly relevant question, and one that dogs even the most experienced and socially conscious photographers. Despite this dilemma, many photographers forge ahead, shining a light on horrors and glories with the hope that their images have a positive influence and perhaps, because of this dilemma, some photographers have found ways to use their art, labor, contacts, experiences, and insight to raise money specifically for organizations that are “making a difference.” Salem Krieger is an experienced editorial and portrait photographer who had a seemingly simple realization in 2015: he could sell prints of his work and give a portion of the revenue to a non-profit organization of his choice. From this grew Art is Helping, his system for putting artists and art buyers together and letting the buyers determine how much they spend and which organization they support. In a short time, the roster of artists has grown, as has the varied list of non-profits that benefit from the transactions. Alison Wright is an accomplished documentary photographer and author whose work has taken her to every corner of the world. Her latest book,  Human Tribe,  is available through Amazon and Barnes & Noble. In 2000, a tragic, near-death accident on a jungle road in Laos and a remarkable story of heroism and recovery brought a heightened perspective to the strength and spirit that pushes people to help one another—even to risk their lives to help complete strangers. With the resolve and empathy born from suffering, Wright rebuilt her life and career and founded Faces of Hope, a fund that provides medical care and education, especially to women and children in crisis around the world. The first act of Faces of Hope was to return to the village in Laos—and the people who saved her life—with five doctors and $10,000 worth of medical supplies. We speak with these two photographers about their work and about the mechanisms they have created to bring assistance to those who need it, while continuing to do the photography they love. Guests: Alison Wright and Salem Krieger “Tibet Girl” 2005. Photograph by Alison Wright Malagan Ceremonial Mask, Papua New Guinea, 2010. Photograph by Alison Wright Cover of Alison Wright’s latest book, “Human Tribe” “NYC News Stand” by Salem Krieger, from Art is Helping “42nd St. Alien” by Antonio Mari, from Art is Helping “Shadows” by Cynthia Karalla, from Art is Helping “VSH #4” by Julie Gross, from Art is Helping “Beetle” by Jose Maximiliano Sinani Paredes Shezchez, from Art is Helping “Auto America: New Mexico” by Salem Krieger, from Art is Helping Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 08/04/2017
We tried something a little different with this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. We took three writers from our Explora blog along with us as we visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art to see the much praised photography retrospective, Irving Penn: Centennial. Upon our return we gathered to talk about the exhibit and the influential work of Irving Penn. If you love photography, the name Irving Penn should be familiar to you, but this retrospective places equal emphasis on work that falls outside the realm of his famed fashion and portraiture for Vogue Magazine and synthesizes his almost 70 years of photography, acquainting us with his still-life, documentary, nudes, and even street photography, as well as with his skills as a printer. Along with our guests Cory Rice, Jill Waterman, and Akeem Addy, we talk about the works on view in this retrospective-- what impressed us the most, what confused us, what surprised us, what we learned about the cohesive strength of composition, light, and gesture in Penn’s work, and just how influential he has been on all of our photography, whether we realize it or not. Guests: Jill Waterman, Cory Rice, Akeem Addy Rochas Mermaid Dress (Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn), Paris, 1950. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York © Condé Nast Pablo Picasso at La Californie, Cannes, 1957. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation Fishmonger, London, 1950. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © Condé Nast Cuzco Children, 1948. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © Condé Nast Cigarette No. 37, New York, 1972. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation After-Dinner Games, New York, 1947. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © Condé Nast Three Asaro Mud Men, New Guinea, 1970. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation Single Oriental Poppy, New York, 1968. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation Marlene Dietrich, New York, 1948. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation Tribesman with Nose Disc, New Guinea, 1970. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation Truman Capote, New York, 1948. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation Glove and Shoe, New York, 1947. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, © Condé Nast Irving Penn’s Rolleiflex camera on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photograph by John Harris Jill Waterman, Allan Weitz, Cory Rice, Akeem Addy. Photograph by John Harris Previous Pause Next All Photographs by Irving Penn, except where noted DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 09/01/2017
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we continue our exploration of photographic collaboration with photojournalists Ben Lowy and Marvi Lacar. In addition to sharing a vocation, they also share two children and a life together. Photojournalism is a decidedly independent, at times dangerous, career, certainly not one known for a routine home life, but when domestic responsibilities and children enter the picture, how does a couple balance craft and career with the need to earn a living and the time needed to nurture relationships? More so, when both people are working in the same field, how does bolstering one career cross the line into debilitating the other and how do the individuals comprising a creative couple find ways to support each other’s efforts? Lowy and Lacar bring an animated humor and a willingness to talk about the difficult moments from their lives and careers, and explain how they have come to recognize their best personal and professional attributes, bringing those strengths into a working relationship that continues to evolve. Guests: Marvi Lacar and Ben Lowy From the series "Melting Pot," Marvi Lacar From the series "Melting Pot," Marvi Lacar From the series "U.S. Bases," Marvi Lacar From the series "U.S. Bases," Marvi Lacar From “This Is a Love Story,” Marvi Lacar From “This Is a Love Story,” Marvi Lacar 2004 Democratic National Convention, Ben Lowy Protest at 2004 Republican National Convention, Ben Lowy Iraq Perspectives #1, Ben Lowy Iraq perspectives, #2, Ben Lowy Wounded soldier, Iraq, Ben Lowy Ski Jumper, Sochi, 2014, Ben Lowy Speed Skater, Sochi, 2014, Ben Lowy Great White Shark, 2016, Ben Lowy Seal, 2016, Ben Lowy Ben Lowy and Marvi Lacar at B&H Photography Podcast, John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
1 — 11 of 45 items

Pages

Close

Close

Close