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Posted 04/22/2021
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we focus on the work of photographer Todd Webb and, specifically, the series of images he created in Africa in 1958, while on assignment for the United Nations. We are joined by Betsy Evans Hunt, the Executive Director of the Todd Webb Archive, and by Aimée Bessire and Erin Hyde Nolan, coauthors of the new book, Todd Webb in Africa—Outside the Frame. With our guests, we discuss the photographic career of Todd Webb, including his work in New York and Paris in the 1940s and 1950s, and the founding and mission of the Todd Webb Archive. Our primary topic, however, is the rediscovery (in a steamer trunk) and eventual archiving and publishing of Webb’s photographs taken in several African nations over the course of a multi-month assignment organized by the United Nations. The images are notable not only for their fateful recovery but for their large and medium format color composition and intelligent eye; they tell a vibrant story of Africa at a moment between colonization and independence. With authors Bessire and Nolan, we discuss the making of their book, which is both a photography book of unique vision and a multifaceted study of the images themselves, with essays and interviews providing historical context and cultural and artistic analysis. Join us for this conversation on the work of an overlooked 20th-century master photographer and on a sweeping series of color photos that sat unseen for almost 60 years. Guests: Betsy Evans Hunt, Aimée Bessire, and Erin Hyde Nolan Photograph © Todd Webb Cover, “Todd Webb in Africa – Outside the Frame” © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 06/30/2020
This week on the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome two old friends of the podcast to talk about the latest gear from their respective companies. First up is Rudy Winston, Technical Advisor at Canon USA, and then we welcome Marc Farb, Technical Rep from Sigma. Both Winston and Farb are breaking records with this, their fifth visit to our show. With Rudy Winston, we discuss a few cameras that were released last year or earlier in 2020, such as the Canon EOS 6D Mark II DSLR and the EOS 1D X Mark III DSLR, to get a sense of how they are being received, and then we briefly discuss what may be the most-anticipated camera of 2020, the upcoming EOS R5 Mirrorless Digital Camera. In addition, we talk about the latest Rebel T8i DSLR, CF Express memory cards, and the incredible RF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens. After a short break, we start our conversation with Marc Farb, discussing the impressive Sigma fp Mirrorless Camera, which was announced almost a year ago but has become the latest big deal for those wanting a compact full frame camera that can be the basis of both a complete photo or cine system. From there, we talk lenses. Sigma continues to produce incredible lenses in all categories and for most major camera systems, including the 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Lens for the Sony E system and the just-announced 16mm f/1.4 DC DN and 30mm f/1.4 DC DN for L-mount systems. After a quick mention of Sigma’s adapters and its new UD-11 USB Dock for Leica L-mount lenses, Farb relates an all-time favorite lens of his that is ideal for sports, wedding, and concert photographers, among others: the Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports Lens. Join us for this informative and practical discussion of the most interesting new gear from Canon and Sigma. Guests: Rudy Winston and Marc Farb Canon EOS 6D Mark II DSLR Camera Body with Accessory Kit Canon EOS 1D X Mark III DSLR Camera Canon EOS Rebel T8i DSLR Camera Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens Sigma fp Mirrorless Digital Camera Sigma 16mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary Lens Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Contemporary Lens for Sony E-mount Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports Lens Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/19/2020
As an industry and as a hobby, the numbers indicate that drone flying and drone photography are still primarily the domain of men, but sustaining this disparity is ridiculous and it should and will change. Our two guests today are part of bringing about that change, and they do so by being good at their craft, by spreading the joy of flying, and teaching drone operation and photography to women and girls. Our first guest today is an Emmy Award-winning camerawoman for CBS News and F.A.A. licensed drone pilot Carmaine Means, who incorporates quadcopter footage into her news coverage and, of course, flies for fun. After a break, we are joined by Yasmin Tajik, a documentary photographer and F.A.A. licensed drone operator who is also the Brand Ambassador Director for the educational and advocacy group Women Who Drone. We get to know the work of each guest, asking Means how and when she decides to use aerial footage in a news segment, what her personal guidelines are for launching a drone, and what the planning stage is like with her producers. We also talk about the value of certain aerial shots in telling a story, about the equipment she uses, and handling the drones in various conditions. Currently, she flies with a DJI Phantom and an Inspire. With Yasmin Tajik, we mention the Federal Aviation Administration licensing process and she recommends the FAA Drone Zone as a good place to start. We also ask her about using drones in documentary work and some of the restrictions placed on flying in the U.S. and other countries. As a resident of Arizona, she discusses some of the advantages of flying in that state, as well as unique guidelines they have established. We also speak about how she learned to fly after initially being hesitant, the work done by Women Who Drone, and taking her Tello Quadcopter into schools and the interest it generates from the next generation of flyers. Tajik also points to the many industries and services that are incorporating drones and the growing opportunities available for licensed pilots, but we don’t forget to talk about the joy she gets by using her DJI Mavic 2 to provide a perspective on the world that our land-based cameras can never match. Join us for this enjoyable and inspirational conversation and if you are a female drone flyer, we’d love to hear your experiences and see your images. Guests: Carmaine Means and Yasmin Tajik Photograph © Yasmin Tajik​ © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik Courtesy Yasmin Tajik © Carmaine Means © Carmaine Means © Carmaine Means Courtesy Carmaine Means Carmaine Means © Phillip Dembinsky Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/11/2020
It’s easy to admire Sebastian Meyer, not simply because he’s a talented photographer who also co-founded the first photojournalism agency in Iraq, but because he is confident enough to speak of his shortcomings, his naiveté, and of tragedy. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome Meyer to discuss his “love at first sight” for photojournalism, the Metrography photo agency he opened in Iraqi Kurdistan, and how he lost a colleague and friend to the violence of the war against ISIS. We also laugh a bunch during this episode and talk about being an “arrogant white guy,” how research can create preconceived ideas, the tropes of war photography, a bit about gear, and about the conditional nature of journalistic standards and freedom of the press. After a short break, we learn of Meyer’s involvement in a prolonged hostage situation, his return to photojournalism, and how his new book, Under Every Yard of Sky, is not only a beautiful chronicle of modern Iraqi Kurdistan, in war and in peace, but is also a tribute to a friend taken too soon. Join us for this wonderful conversation that touches on so many important issues of the contemporary documentary and photojournalism. Guest: Sebastian Meyer Manchester, United Kingdom 2005. Photograph © Sebastian Meyer Manchester, United Kingdom 2005. Photograph © Sebastian Meyer cover of Under Every Yard of Sky by Sebastian Meyer, 2019 from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer Friends and family of Kamaran grieve after hearing the news of his death, 2014. Photograph © Sebastian Meyer Sebastian and Kamaran, Photograph courtesy Sebastian Meyer Allan Weitz and Sebastian Meyer, 2020. Photograph © John Harris Sebastian Meyer on the B&H Photography Podcast, 2020. Photograph © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/08/2020
During a little holiday trip, producer John Harris made a visit to the gallery and studio of photographer Clyde Butcher. For anyone who grew up in Florida, Butcher’s work should be very familiar; his photography is often found on the walls of local libraries, municipal buildings, and, as Miami native Jason Tables points out, “every doctor’s office I’ve ever been in.” Butcher’s images of the Florida landscapes, particularly of the Everglades, are legendary, and although he has a brisk print-sales business, many of the photos in libraries have the attached placard, “Donated by Clyde Butcher.” Although he is known primarily for his large format black-and-white photography of “the swamp,” Butcher’s photographic career extends back many decades and includes architectural photography, mountain and western landscapes, filmed documentaries, and decorative color photography. Interestingly, Butcher began his career selling prints at small art fairs and, in the 1970s, he had a thriving business selling thousands of prints through department stores such as Sears and Montgomery Ward. This episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is a casual conversation that glides through several topics, including Butcher’s work with large format cameras, his recent foray into Sony digital cameras paired with Canon tilt-shift lenses, the incredible set of vintage enlargers in his giant darkroom space, the business models he and his family employ to market his images, water conservation, and, of course, his relationship to the Florida landscape for which he will be forever linked. Join us for this conversation with a true master. Guest: Clyde Butcher Above photograph © Clyde Butcher Tamiani Trail © Clyde Butcher Cigar Orchid Pond © Clyde Butcher Ochopee © Clyde Butcher Big Cypress © Clyde Butcher Moonrise © Clyde Butcher Plaja-S’Arenella-with-Boat, from Salvador Dali series © Clyde Butcher Cadaques, from Salvador Dali series © Clyde Butcher Cap-de-Creus, from Salvador Dali series © Clyde Butcher Clocks by Clyde Butcher circa, 1970s © Clyde Butcher Clyde Butcher and John Harris © Niki Butcher Niki and Clyde Butcher © John Harris Clyde Butcher in his Venice, Florida office © John Harris Butcher workshop and darkroom, 2019 © John Harris Niki Butcher with enlarger, 2019 © John Harris Clyde Butcher in Movie Dome with 11 x 14" view camera © Clyde Butcher Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/07/2019
“A wiser feller than myself once said, ‘Sometimes you eat the bear, and sometimes the bear, well, he eats you.’” A few of our listeners may recognize this quote from a certain 1998 movie but, for others, well, it may just be a confusing adage. For today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, however, we did indeed “eat the bear” and are very fortunate to welcome actor, musician, and photographer Jeff Bridges to our show. In addition to being an Academy Award-winning actor, Bridges photographs the “behind-the-scenes” making of his movies with a Widelux swing-lens panoramic film camera, and over the years has collected those images in private editions, made for the cast and crew. In 2003, he published a book called, Jeff Bridges: Pictures, and in October 2019, is releasing the incredible Jeff Bridges: Pictures Volume 2, which “expands on Bridges' intimate vision of Hollywood behind-the-scenes. Included within are rare looks at the famed actors, top directors, talented costumers, and makeup artists, skilled and creative set and art decoration, and the rest of the passionate crews involved in such memorable movies as True Grit, Crazy Heart, The Giver, TRON: Legacy, and Hell or High Water. ” With Bridges, we discuss his affinity for the Widelux, and how he handles this camera—known for its idiosyncrasies. We relate the nuts-and-bolts aspects of his workflow, from using the viewfinder (or not) to measuring exposure with a Minolta spot meter, to how he composes a frame with a 140-degree angle of view. We also discuss other wide-format cameras, how Bridges works on set with other actors and crew members, the creation of his new book, and the scope of his photographic work, which has become a unique documentation of movie-making from the 1980s until today. Join us for this lively conversation and look for Jeff Bridges: Pictures Volume 2, published by powerHouse Books and distributed by Penguin Random House. All of Bridge’s proceeds from the sale of his book go to the Motion Picture & Television Fund, a nonprofit organization that offers charitable care and support to film-industry workers. When you visit his website, check the link for No Kid Hungry, an organization dedicated to ending childhood hunger and for which Bridges is the national spokesperson. Finally, if you are in the Los Angeles area on October 15, take the opportunity to have Jeff sign your copy of his book at the Book Soup event, on Sunset Blvd. Guest: Jeff Bridges Above photograph © Jeff Bridges George Clooney, Tragedia/Comedia, "The Men Who Stare at Goats," 2009 © Jeff Bridges Iron Man Suit, "Iron Man," 2008 © Jeff Bridges Stan Winston’s Workshop, "Iron Man," 2008 © Jeff Bridges Stephen Bruton, Songwriter, "Crazy Heart," 2009 © Jeff Bridges Jack Nation, "Crazy Heart," 2009 © Jeff Bridges Gary Ross, Director, and Tobey Maguire, "Seabiscuit," 2003 © Jeff Bridges Claudio Miranda and Olivia Wilde, "Tron: Legacy," 2010 © Jeff Bridges Loyd Catlett, "Seventh Son," 2014 © Jeff Bridges "Scenes of the Crime," 2001 © Jeff Bridges Jodelle Ferland, Tragedia/Comedia, "Tideland," 2005 © Jeff Bridges Jeff Bridges, "True Grit," 2010 © Jeff Bridges Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/24/2019
For this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we took our portable recorders to an elegant mansion along Central Park, which had been decked out by Sony as a series of stylized photography sets, complete with full lighting, backdrops, and models. They also happened to have on hand many brand-new Sony Alpha a7R IV Mirrorless Digital Cameras and hundreds of lenses for the guests to shoot with in these mini studios. Let’s not forget about the great music, delicious food, and open bar Sony provided. All in all, it was a wonderful event to celebrate the highest megapixel full-frame camera on the market. Sony invited many impressive photographers, writers, influencers, retailers, and… us. And we made our way through the many rooms, speaking with Sony representatives and photographers, getting their first impressions of this latest incarnation of the Alpha a7R series. Needless to say, people were impressed and, after seeing the specs and handling this new camera, so were we. Our first guest is Michael Bubolo, Senior National Manager from Sony PRO Support. We sat with Bubolo before the crowds arrived and were able to go over some of the upgrades and features and get his thoughts on what makes this camera stand out from previous models. Next, we welcome the one and only Ken Rockwell to ask his thoughts on the camera and anything else he wanted to talk about. After a short break, we speak with visual artist Lori Grinker about her potential uses for the a7R IV and, then, with landscape and travel photographer Jude Allen, who happened to be in town from San Francisco, about his first impressions after handling the camera. Finally, we sit down with Sony Artisans Andy Katz and Colby Brown, who both had had the opportunity to shoot the new camera for a couple of weeks and report back on the features they most appreciate for the specific work they do. Join us for this in-depth look at the latest Sony full-frame mirrorless camera, and let us know if you are ready to upgrade. Guests: Michael Bubolo, Ken Rockwell, Lori Grinker, Jude Allen, Andy Katz, and Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/19/2019
B&H recently hosted the OPTIC Outdoor, Photo/Video, Travel Imaging Conference, which gave us an opportunity to sit with many wonderful photographers including Ron Magill, Frans Lanting, and Erin Babnik, and we will be publishing these conversations over the next few weeks. Today we welcome representatives from Canon, Panasonic Lumix, and Sony to discuss their latest wares. First we speak with Ross Joseph from Canon about his company's  photo printer options, specifically the imagePROGRAF PRO-1000, a wonderful 17” desktop printer with professional features. Next we welcome Tom Curley from Panasonic to talk about the LUMIX camera line and the incredible new DC-S1H full-frame mirrorless camera and the L-mount consortium. Finally, we welcome Ben Manlove, Sr. Representative from Sony Digital Imaging PRO Support. Ben discusses new firmware updates and a range of Sony gear, including the gems of the E-mount system, new lenses from Sony and the waterproof/crushproof Cyber-shot DSC-RX0 II Digital Camera. Join us for this informative episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. Guests: Ross Joseph, Tom Curley, Ben Manlove Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-2000 24" Professional Photographic Large-Format Inkjet Printer Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-6000 60" Professional Photographic Large-Format Inkjet Printer Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 Mirrorless Digital Camera Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5S Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera Panasonic Lumix S PRO 70-200mm f/4 O.I.S. Lens Panasonic DMW-STC14 Lumix S 1.4x Teleconverter Sony Alpha a7 III Mirrorless Digital Camera Sony RX0 Ultra-Compact Waterproof/Shockproof Camera Sony FE 24mm f/1.4 GM Lens Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/22/2019
Adriane Ohanesian has been on the B&H Photography Podcast in the past and we are very excited to welcome her back to discuss her photojournalistic work in Africa. As many of our listeners will recall, Ohanesian contributed to our podcast throughout 2017 in a serial segment we called “ Dispatch,” in which she provided monthly reports on her freelance assignments covering conflict and climate change in Sudan and Somalia. She also narrated the story of a deadly attack she survived while covering a story on illegal mining in Congo. It was a harrowing and tragic account that demonstrates the lengths to which photojournalists will go to cover a story. On today’s episode, Ohanesian updates us on a few of the items we discussed in 2017, including the illegal mining story and her assignment on the last white male rhinoceros in existence, which has since died. She also talks about a recent assignment for National Geographic, covering illegal mining and deforestation in Madagascar, and her work back in Congo covering an Ebola outbreak. In addition, Ohanesian provides insight into her life as a freelance photojournalist, reflects on incorporating video and audio into her workflow to get important stories told, and offers tips on the gear she uses for her arduous and often very remote assignments. Adriane Ohanesian is a respected photojournalist living in Nairobi and covering news stories throughout East Africa. Her coverage of the civil war in South Sudan garnered her a 2016 World Press Photo Award and she is also the recipient of the 2016 Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award. Join us for this compelling and inspirational episode. Guest: Adriane Ohanesian Marcellina, (center), who survived the militia attack, stands at attention over the grave of her colleague, Antopo Selemani, during the funeral of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve rangers outside of the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 17, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian Okapi Wildlife Reserve park rangers help to lower the body of their young porter, Lokana Tingiti, into the ground during the funeral of the rangers outside of the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 17, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian A woman cries over the grave of Léopold Ngbekusa during the funeral of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve rangers, outside of the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 17, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian Two men who were caught with eight diamonds, and who were mining inside of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve, were arrested and held by park rangers at their headquarters, in the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 12, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian Men shovel and pump water at the Bemainty sapphire mining site, inside of the Ankeniheny- Zahamena Corridor (CAZ), a protected area in Madagascar. Beginning in 2015, when the sapphire rush was first underway, this section quickly became a threat to the rain forest’s flora and fauna, July 29, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Diego Salimoali, age 37, stands with a pet brown lemur as he watches men work in the largest sapphire mining site in Bemainty, July 29, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Laurence Asma, age 41, shows off sapphires that she, her husband, and team of about twenty workers found in the largest mining site in Bemainty, inside of the Ankeniheny- Zahamena Corridor (CAZ), a protected area in Madagascar, July 28, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Roki, a black-and-white ruffed lemur, and Bridola, a brown lemur, are kept as pets in the back of a restaurant and shop, in a community of artisanal gold and sapphire miners living in Ambodipaiso, inside of the Ankeniheny- Zahamena Corridor (CAZ), a protected area in Madagascar, July 29, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Healthcare workers pause for a photo as they finish dressing in their Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) at the beginning of the morning shift at the treatment center, in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic in North Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 5, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Ebola survivor and "Guardian of the Ill," Pamela Kiyangaliya, age 33, gets dressed in her Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) as she prepares to start her morning shift at the treatment center, in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic in North Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 5, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Ebola responders with an armed police escort run with one of two coffins to be buried at the cemetery, on a hill in Butembo, in North Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. The responders have been a frequent target in attacks by community members and militias, March 6, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal The cemetery where Pamela Kiyangaliya’s sister is buried with many others who died from Ebola, on a hill above Butembo, Democratic Republic of Congo. According to the World Health Organization, there have been 848 confirmed cases and 509 confirmed deaths in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, March 6, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/29/2018
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome photographer Rick McGinnis and curator Julie Grahame, to discuss blogging and archiving. While this is certainly a broad subject, we will focus on the work of our two guests while considering how best to keep a collection of photos vibrant and valuable. Rick McGinnis is a veteran portrait, editorial, and travel photographer based in Toronto. Most of his assignments and self-assignments had been for local newspapers and magazines and, when this professional landscape changed and motivation was lacking, he almost got out of the business entirely. With a little encouragement, he began to explore the many images he had shot over the previous twenty years—some he had never even viewed—despite being gorgeous portraits of well-known musicians, actors, and artists. The result of this deep dig was a blog he simply called someoldpicturesitook. The blog proved to be an avenue not only into his past, but to his future, because images never seen were now appreciated, discussed, shared, and ultimately, licensed. McGinnis is now on to a new travel blog  and a new chapter in his career, and we will hear what he has learned along the way. Curator, consultant, and writer  Julie Grahame is the publisher of aCurator.com, a full-screen photography magazine, and the associated aCurator blog. She directed the Retna photo agency for 16 years and currently represents the estate of Yousuf Karsh for image licensing and maintains the extensive karsh.org website. We speak with Grahame about the benefits of a blog compared to a website, Instagram, or in her case, a webzine, and we discuss her relationship with the Karsh archive and insights she has drawn from licensing his iconic portraits. Throughout the humorous conversation, we consider Google search tools, tagging, preferred blogging sites, and repurposing older work, but we also touch on the personal, professional, and historical importance of valuing and maintaining your photo collection. Guests: Julie Grahame and Rick McGinnis Fela Kuti, 1989 © Rick McGinnis John Waters, 1987 © Rick McGinnis Patti Smith, 1995 © Rick McGinnis Jay McInerney, 1998 © Rick McGinnis Bjork, 1997 © Rick McGinnis Anne Hathaway, 2004 © Rick McGinnis Rebecca Hall, 2016 © Rick McGinnis Kinky Friedman, 2016 © Rick McGinnis Dwight Eisenhower, 1946 © Yousuf Karsh Ernest Hemingway, 1957 © Yousuf Karsh Winston Churchill, 1941© Yousuf Karsh Ansel Adams and Yousuf Karsh, Courtesy Yousuf Karsh Archive Rick McGinnis © John Harris Rick McGinnis and Julie Grahame © John Harris Rick McGinnis, Allan Weitz, and Julie Grahame © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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