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Posted 05/13/2021
This week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is an old-fashioned hands-on review, but in this case, made with six hands. Allan, Jason, and I were pleased to be loaned the Leica Q2 Digital Camera and the Leica Q2 Monochrom Digital Camera, and we use our consideration of these 47MP cameras as a springboard to talk about camera grips, and point-and-shoot cameras, and value. We also talk about macro photography and cropping and about how to create black-and-white images from color files. We begin the conversation mentioning the specs and features of these two incredible cameras and each of us offers our pros and cons regarding the features we liked best and those we felt lacking. Autofocus, body design, focal length, and responsiveness are mentioned. Other Leica cameras, such as the Leica M10-P, get discussed, too, as do the practical differences between rangefinders with removable lenses and point-and-shoots. Join us for this casual chat about photography and about how each of us, with our different workflows, aesthetics, and goals, found these cameras to be versatile, yet also challenged us to create better images. Guests: Allan Weitz, Jason Tables, John Harris Photograph © John Harris © Jason Tables © Jason Tables © Jason Tables © John Harris © John Harris © John Harris Leica Q2 Monochrom Digital Camera © John Harris © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 01/15/2020
Imagine the privilege of being present at the creation of one of the “wonders of the world,” and then imagine being asked to document the magnitude—and the details—of that creation. Our guest on today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast has just that privilege and that responsibility and, as he puts it, this telescope may “change the way we understand our universe.” Chris Gunn has been a NASA contract photographer for almost twenty years but, for the past ten, he has dedicated himself to the James Webb Space Telescope and documenting the construction and eventual launch of this spacecraft, which will replace the Hubble as NASA’s most powerful telescope. We speak with Gunn about all aspects of his job and, specifically, about the gorgeous medium format images he creates that are made available to the public. Gunn is responsible for documenting the construction process, which includes portraits of scientists, as well as macro shots of screws, and he relates how he has “taken the extra step” to evolve as a photographer, incorporating medium format photography and detailed setups. Gunn must be prepared to shoot any style of photo and he discusses his daily responsibilities, how his gear has evolved over time, the lighting he chooses, and his interaction with the hundreds and technicians and scientists he works with regularly. We also discuss marketing yourself as a photographer and the specific challenges that make his job like no other, including working in giant “clean rooms,” accepting that your work is immediately in the public domain, and incorporating the aesthetics from science-fiction films. Sitting in on this recording is our own member of the B&H Space Force, writer Todd Vorenkamp. Join us for this fascinating episode in which we learn about this incredible spacecraft and the work that goes into documenting its creation and check out our 2016 episode, in which we speak with the imaging scientists from the  Hubble Telescope mission. Guest: Chris Gunn Above photograph © Chris Gunn Chamber A Door © Chris Gunn/NASA Blanket Inspection © Chris Gunn/NASA Wings Deployed © Chris Gunn/NASA Lights Out Inspection © Chris Gunn/NASA Container Doors © Chris Gunn/NASA Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/04/2019
We have been hosting the B&H Photography Podcast Panasonic LUMIX S1 Sweepstakes for the past several weeks and, today, we are excited to announce the winners of the LUMIX DC-S1 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 24-105mm lens and the LUMIX DC-G95 Mirrorless Camera with a 12-60mm lens. With that in mind, we’d like to thank all of our listeners who left ratings and reviews on Apple Podcasts, and particularly those who subscribed to the podcast and mentioned a favorite episode. This kind of feedback is well appreciated and helps us to develop the kind of episodes we hope you enjoy. Before we make that announcement, however, Allan, Jason, and I reflect on our “ photography New Year’s resolutions ” and discuss our personal photography projects from 2019 and the gear we have been using to make them happen. We start with Allan, who discusses his year-long process of culling his archive of images going back to 1969, including finding what he refers to as the very first “Allan Weitz photo.” He also explains how he uses his Sony Alpha a7R II Mirrorless Digital Camera as his “Franken-slide copier” and some of the gear that has impressed him this year, including the 7artisans Photoelectric 50mm f/1.1 lens and the Zeiss Batis 40mm f/2 CF lens, and his thoughts on the just-announced Leica M-E (Typ 240) Digital Rangefinder. John continues with a brief explanation of the resolutions on which he is procrastinating, and on his return to street photography and attempts to work with the FUJIFILM X100F Digital Camera, the Ricoh GR III, and the Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) Digital Rangefinder. Finally, Jason updates us on his telephoto cityscapes, his abstract portraiture, the Sony Clear Image Zoom function and whether or not he purchased the Sony FE 100-400mm f/4.5-56 GM OSS lens. Join us for this enjoyable chat and check out some of the previous episodes of the podcast which we mention during this conversation, including our talks with Jay Maisel and Stephen Wilkes, our discussion about hard drives, and our talk with landscape photographer Erin Babnik. © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz © Jason Tables © Jason Tables © Jason Tables © Jason Tables © John Harris © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/23/2018
We are delighted, at the B&H Photography Podcast, to present our chat with acclaimed portrait photographer Chris Buck. Buck is an in-demand celebrity and advertising photographer, but he also maintains ongoing personal projects, such as his current series, “Gentleman’s Club.” We speak with him on a range of topics, from concept development, shooting technique, and gear, to editing decisions and self-publishing. With a flexible yet unmistakable style that blends insight, a touch of dry, almost absurdist humor, and a pinch of the darkness within, Buck has photographed a host of luminaries from the worlds of film, music, and politics, including four of our last five Presidents. His most recent book, Uneasy, is a 30-year compendium of incredible portraits; we discuss the making of this book and, of course, some of his most recognized images. We also speak with Buck about process: his “three tiers of ideas,” thoughts on humor, his adjustment to digital photography, and DSLR versus medium format. In this wide-ranging conversation, Buck opines on his relationship with subjects, the nature of portraiture, his influences from pop culture and photography, and how “being relaxed and having fun are the enemies of a good Chris Buck photo.” Guest: Chris Buck Barack Obama, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Elvis Costello, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck George McGovern, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Leonard Cohen, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Philip Seymour Hoffman and John C. Reilly, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Steve Martin, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Steve Martin, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck William F. Buckley, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Jonathan Millet, from the "Gentleman’s Club" series © Chris Buck Vincent Rodriguez, from the "Gentleman’s Club" series © Chris Buck Chris Buck on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Allan Weitz and Chris Buck © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence
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Posted 07/21/2017
When you get a chance to speak with an expert, you take advantage. At this year’s OPTIC 2017 Conference, when Lance Keimig and Chris Nicholson passed by our mobile studio, we did just that. Keimig is an author, instructor, and above all, a photographer who specializes in night photography. Well before digital technology made photographing the Milky Way an easy endeavor, Keimig was experimenting with film stock and developing processes to create long-exposure images. He is currently an instructor at National Parks at Night and along with Nicholson, offers workshops in night photography at many US National Parks. On today’s episode, we speak with Keimig and Nicholson about the differences between creating night photography with film and with digital cameras. There are obviously many modes and functions on a digital camera that make night photography simpler, but at the heart of the enterprise, is the process the same? We ask this question and discuss techniques used with film and the advantages that accompany digital cameras. We also ask, “What is night photography?” and “What are the charms that keep these two photographers interested in this specific discipline?” Listen as Keimig provides insight into the history of night photography and Nicholson discusses his shooting methods and ideas on composition that he applies while working in national parks. Guests: Lance Keimig and Chris Nicholson Click here if you missed our episode,  Night Photography—Exploring the Creative Possibilities. Click here for Jill Waterman’s article on Lance Keimig’s switch from Canon to Nikon equipment. Film photograph, Lance Keimig Film photograph, Lance Keimig Film photograph, Lance Keimig Film photograph, Lance Keimig Film photograph, Lance Keimig Digital photograph, Lance Keimig Digital photograph, Lance Keimig Blue Ridge Parkway, Chris Nicholson Cape Cod National Seashore, Chris Nicholson Death Valley National Park, Chris Nicholson Joshua Tree National Park, Chris Nicholson Mount Rainier National Park, Chris Nicholson Olympic National Park, Chris Nicholson Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/10/2017
Today’s episode broadens our normal photographic sphere as we discuss ophthalmic photography and how the eye’s own optical system is used in conjunction with camera equipment—some techniques very common, some not so—to examine the interior of the eye and to diagnose illnesses that go far beyond problems with vision. We are joined by Mark Maio, clinical medical and ophthalmic photographer and developer of the first high-resolution digital imaging system in ophthalmology. We talk with Maio about his early interest in social justice photography, working as a “jack-of-all-trades” photographer for a hospital, and how his eventual concentration in ophthalmic photography led to early adoption of digital technology and the development of a tool that helped to transform the industry. Throughout this conversation, we learn about the use of analog and digital photography in the biomedical field and how fundus cameras and other specialized gear are used to diagnose optical and systemic maladies. When the pupil is dilated, they eye becomes a portal into the body, and with the proper tools, we can see inside our corporeal system without cutting. Maio is also an accomplished fine art and documentary photographer, and we will also discuss how these various disciplines have intersected throughout his career and resulted in the workshops he leads on ophthalmic imaging, documentary, and landscape photography on the beautiful Isle of Skye. Guest: Mark Maio From the series Saving Sight-- The Flying Eye Hospital From the series Against the Grain – Buffalo Grain Industry From the series, Isle of Skye Previous Pause Next All photographs by Mark Maio DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/03/2017
The B&H Photography Podcast team was invited to a special event hosted by DJI and the B&H Marketing team to introduce filmmakers and photographers to the Phantom 4 Pro and Inspire 2 drones. Not only did we get to fly these incredible machines, but we took the time to talk with several photographers and drone experts to get their impressions, not only on the latest DJI models, but on other drone platforms and aerial photography applications. We begin this episode with Adam Lisberg, U.S. spokesperson for DJI, and hear his thoughts on its most recent offerings. We then sit with a previous guest, Randy Scott Slavin, of Yeah Drones and the New York City Drone Film Festival. Slavin discusses the technical leaps that drones have made in the past year, and highlights his favorite platforms. Next, we talk with Andrew Scrivani, food photographer and stylist for the New York Times and other publications, on how he is incorporating drones into his work. After a pause, we turn to a lively chat with Sara Dietschy, Kraig Adams, and Ollie Ritchie, three social media influencers using drones in their content creation. Then we speak with Roberto Blake, a YouTube educator, who took advantage of this event to fly his first drone; he offers wonderful insight from the perspective of a newbie. We then welcome podcasters Chris Barrows and Amir Zonozi, from “ Why I Social,” for information on the P4 Pro and on flying in restricted areas, and we conclude with drone builder and pilot Parker Gyokeres, from Propellerheads Aerial Photography, to get his take on why he switched from homebuilding drones to DJI. Join us for this multifaceted episode on the latest in drone technology, and listen for a B&H Photography Podcast exclusive promo code to get free propellers and a discount on the extended protection plan for the Mavic Pro, from DJI. Guests: Adam Lisberg, Randy Scott Slavin, Andrew Scrivani, Sara Dietschy, Kraig Adams, Ollie Ritchie, Roberto Blake, Chris Barrows, Amir Zonozi, and Parker Gyokeres Photographs © John R Harris The DJI Inspire 2 Drone Flying the Phantom 4 Pro on the roof of the Bathhouse Studio Randy Scott Slavin and Allan Weitz Andrew Scrivani Kraig Adams, Ollie Ritchie, Allan Weitz and Sara Dietschy Parker Gyokeres with the Inspire 2 My first photo taken with a drone DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/29/2016
In celebration of Gail Buckland ’s wonderful new book, Who Shot Sports: A Photographic History, 1843 to the Present, and the accompanying exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, we take a look at sports photography from all angles. With Buckland, we discuss the making of her book and the role that sports photography has played in the history and technology of photography. Buckland breaks apart false distinctions by including photographers as diverse as Andy Warhol, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Stanley Kubrick with legendary sports photographers such as Walter Iooss and Charles Conlon. Her research on individual photos and overall perspective on sports photography opens up the genre to the wide world of art, and her insights are invaluable. Also joining us is photographer Andrew Bernstein, well known as the long-time photographer for the Los Angeles Lakers. He has served as official photographer for the L.A. Clippers, Kings, and Dodgers, and held the position of Senior Director of NBA Photos. Bernstein has photographed a wide variety of sports and has published several books, including Journey to the Ring, documenting the 2009-10 Lakers championship season. His awards and accolades run deep and he was instrumental in developing the multiple camera Flash Wizard II system, which revolutionized indoor sports action photography through the use of triggers and remotes with strobe lighting. Bernstein discusses his career development, gear setups and shooting techniques, as well as his relationship with athletes, specifically with Kobe Bryant, whose photo is included in the book and exhibit, Who Shot Sports. Photograph above courtesy Tim Clayton Guests: Gail Buckland and Andrew Bernstein Andrew Bernstein Photos © Andrew D. Bernstein / NHLI / Getty Images © Andrew D. Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images © Andrew D. Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images © Andrew D. Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images © Andrew D. Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images Photos from Who Shot Sports: A Photographic History, 1843 to the Present George Demany- Chronophotograph – Copyright INSEP IconothEque Hill and Adamson – Courtesy Scottish National Portrait Gallery Jeorg Mitter – Courtsy Jeorg Mitter/Limex Images John Dominis – Courtesy John Dominis/Getty Images Mark Leech – Courtesy Mark Leech and Offside Sports Photography Lucy Nicholson – Alzheimer’s Ping Pong Therapy- Courtesy Lucy Nicholson/Reuters Bob Martin- Courtesy Bob Martin/Sports Illustrated Krystle Wright- Base Jumpers- Collection of Krystle Wright Courtesy Tim Clayton Gail Buckland, Allan Weitz, and Andrew Bernstein Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play         Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/08/2016
Drones are definitely a hot-button topic and not only for photographers! Despite the controversy and legal conundrums, aerial photography is entering an incredible exciting era with the proliferation of drones. Director and photographer, Randy Slavin, founder of Yeah Drones and the New York City Drone Film Festival, provides his enthusiastic input, with product specialist Dan Campo, to a conversation about the use and misuse of drones. We talk about the legal and safety issues of flying drones, as well as the practical applications of drone shooting and, of course, highlight the best and latest in gear for the drone photographer. Randy, Dan, and our host, Allan, pepper our conversation with anecdotes from their experiences flying and filming with drones.  Guests: Randy Scott Slavin and Dan Campo Randy Scott Slavin   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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