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Posted 06/17/2021
Is the light in Chicago different than the light in New York? Can “street photography” set the subjects and control the scene? And just how long should you follow people carrying balloons to get a photograph? These are some of the questions we answer in this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. We welcome photographers Nina Welch Kling and Clarissa Bonet  to the program. Kling lives in New York and Bonet in Chicago, although both are from other places entirely. We talk a bit about the differences in each city’s visual makeup and what defines street photography, but we quickly turn toward the styles and workflow of our two guests. With Bonet we discuss how she constructs scenes using the language of street photography to tell internal stories. Her work is large scale, exacting, and utilizes the strong light, deep shadows, and geometries of the urban environment but, as we find out, she produces and casts her medium format photographs to get the exact image she wants, free of the disruption of the hustling crowd and uncooperative elements. We also ask about her incredible nightscape compositions called “Stray Light” and how they evolved to become large, collaged prints. After a break, we focus on the work of Nina Welch Kling and learn how she’s grown to understand the movement of light through the streets of New York. Kling also discusses positioning herself (“corralling”) and holding her camera to get the angles she needs, as well as to communicate her intention to potential subjects. In addition, we mention FUJIFILM cameras and the wide-angle lenses she prefers. We ask about her series “Duologue,” which pairs two photos together, and how that pairing can add or change meaning. We also dig into the classic themes of anonymity, isolation, and wonder in street photography and how quarantine redirected her practice a bit. Join us for this insightful and easygoing conversation. Guests: Clarissa Bonet and Nina Welch Kling Photograph © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling “Glimpse” 2019 © Clarissa Bonet “Gust” 2018 © Clarissa Bonet “Zipper Effect” 2018 © Clarissa Bonet “Curated Landscape” 2019 © Clarissa Bonet “Open” 2020 © Clarissa Bonet “NYC” 2016 © Clarissa Bonet “Miami” 2020 © Clarissa Bonet “Chicago” 2017 © Clarissa Bonet Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 06/10/2021
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we take a deep dive into the technical, legal, and even theoretical topics surrounding Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) and their growing place in the art and photography worlds. To take on this subject, we welcome cryptocurrency expert and past guest of the show, Drew Hinkes. Hinkes is an attorney and professor and, in 2017, was nominated as one of Coindesk’s Most Influential People in Blockchain. He is also co-founder and General Counsel of Athena Blockchain, a firm focused on tokenized investment products. We also welcome Derek Paul Jack Boyle and Mitra Saboury, who together make up the art collaborative Meatwreck. Meatwreck has recently minted and sold NFTs associated with its art and we ask Boyle and Saboury how the process worked and their general thoughts on NFTs in relation to community and their art work. In addition to clearing some of the murky waters surrounding NFTs, cryptocurrency, and smart contracts, this episode discusses the future of intellectual property and how the blockchain is changing the way we value, store, resell, and protect our copyrighted images. Join us for this in-depth and informative conversation. Guests: Drew Hinkes, Derek Paul Jack Boyle, Mitra Saboury Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 05/27/2021
Not quite three years old, the L-Mount Alliance has already proven successful for its signatory companies—Leica, Sigma, and Panasonic. Built upon the foundation of the Leica L lens mount, the three makers have released a total of nine cameras and a range of lenses, all compatible with each other. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome Marc Farb, Technical Rep from Sigma, John Kreidler, Product Specialist from Leica, and Sean Robinson, Marketing Specialist from Panasonic and host of LUMIX Live, to discuss the beginnings of the L-Mount Alliance, the benefits for each company and for photographers, and to mention some of the latest and favorite cameras and lenses from the partnership. Guests: Sean Robinson, Marc Farb, John Kreidler Leica SL2 Mirrorless Digital Camera Sigma fp L Mirrorless Digital Camera Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H Mirrorless Digital Camera Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG DN Art Lens for Leica L Panasonic Lumix S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 MACRO O.I.S. Lens Leica Vario-Elmarit-SL 24-70mm f/2.8 ASPH. Lens Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 04/08/2021
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome B&H Senior Sales Trainer Kevin Rickert back to the program to discuss the latest cameras and lenses released over the past few months. For today’s episode, we have the support of Audio-Technica and are using its BP40 Large Diaphragm Dynamic Broadcast Microphone. We start with Sony’s new flagship camera, the Alpha A1 Mirrorless Digital Camera, and discuss its impressive features, as well some of the new lenses Sony has introduced, including the Sony FE 50mm f/1.2 GM Lens. We also talk about the new FUJIFILM GFX 100S Medium Format Mirrorless Camera and the FUJIFILM X-E4 Mirrorless Camera. The rest of the episode is dedicated to lenses and a quick look back at some camera releases from late 2020. We mention the incredible new Leica M-mount 35mm f/2 lens and the 28mm f/2 SL lens, a trio of  Pentax  "Limited" lenses, including the tiny 43mm f/1.9 lens, a 15mm Sunstar lens from NiSi, and several others. Cameras from late last year that get a mention are the Nikon Z6 II, the Olympus OM-D E-M10 III, and the Canon PowerShot ZOOM. Join us for this informative chat and start thinking about your spring and summer photography plans! Guest: Kevin Rickert Editor’s Note: Since this podcast was recorded, both Pentax and Sigma have announced new cameras. Both are substantial updates to existing models: Pentax announced the new APS-C flagship Pentax K-3 Mark III DSLR and Sigma introduced the modular fp L Mirrorless Digital Camera. Sony Alpha 1 Mirrorless Digital Camera FUJIFILM GFX 100S Medium Format Mirrorless Camera FUJIFILM X-E4 Mirrorless Digital Camera Sigma fp L Mirrorless Digital Camera Leica APO-Summicron-M 35mm f/2 ASPH. Lens Pentax HD Pentax-FA 43mm f/1.9 Limited NiSi 15mm f/4 Sunstar ASPH Lens Sony FE 50mm f/1.2 GM Lens Sigma 28-70mm f/2.8 DG DN Contemporary Lens Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 12/17/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome photographer Matthew Franklin Carter to the program. Like many photographers, Matt Carter wears a lot of hats. In his case, literally and figuratively, but his photography work blends documentary, editorial, and portrait work and reflects the place he calls home—Greenville, South Carolina. He shoots for regional and specialty magazines and does corporate work and portraits for local artists and businesses. He also assists other photographers and, of course, he has his personal projects. Family, food, fishing, hunting, drag racing, and dirt cars are depicted with humility and grace and a touch of humor. With Carter we discuss a range of topics, but keep our conversation focused on how to work comfortably in varied settings and with different communities of folk. Carter may be at home on the rivers shooting fly fishing, but he also has produced wonderful series at local car-racing tracks, a world with which he is much less familiar. We talk about these two racing projects—“Dirt” and “Glory”—and how he mingles with the drivers and crowd, as well as the gear he uses, from FUJIFILM to Mamiya, to create portraits and documentary-style images. We also discuss photographing hunting and fishing and the portrait work he does, in studio and on location, and the lighting he uses for each situation. We close on the topic of “finding your voice,” and for Carter how his latest project on local food production unites his many passions. Join us for this easygoing and informative conversation. Guest: Matthew Franklin Carter Above photograph © Matthew Franklin Carter From the series “Glory” © Matthew Franklin Carter From the series “Glory” © Matthew Franklin Carter From the series “Glory” © Matthew Franklin Carter From the series “Glory” © Matthew Franklin Carter From the series “Dirt” © Matthew Franklin Carter From the series “Dirt” © Matthew Franklin Carter © Matthew Franklin Carter © Matthew Franklin Carter © Matthew Franklin Carter © Matthew Franklin Carter © Matthew Franklin Carter Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/08/2020
Our conversation on this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is with the fabulous and innovative Duane Michals. Of the many comments he made about his photography practice, a practice that has been commercially and artistically successful for almost sixty years, one that stood out was his aside that “photography has failed [him] as an art form.” The comment comes late in our conversation but refers to the idea that Michals' goal of pure expression is not accommodated by photography alone; he needs to turn to sequential narrative, to writing on photo prints, even to painting on photos to get to the expression that he wants to convey. For anyone looking for how-tos or technique tips, you’ve come to the wrong episode, but to light the path to a true artistic self-expression, Michals’ words hold much promise. We spoke with him about a range of subjects, from how a constant curiosity combined with good work habits fueled his work and success. We talk about his working-class upbringing, his youthful adventures to Texas and, later, to the U.S.S.R. during the Cold War, where he first took photos in earnest. About specific images, we asked about his “Death Comes to the Old Lady,” and he also related a story about photographing Warren Beatty in a New York hotel room. We even spoke about Canon cameras and the references he draws upon for his work, from Walt Whitman and William Blake to Pierre Bonnard and Robert Frank, but mostly we discuss his creative instincts and process, which seem to start and end with the idea, “If you already know what you’re going to do, then you’re not being creative.” Join us for this insightful conversation with a true photographic innovator. Guest: Duane Michals Duane Michals, Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York Death Comes to the Old Lady, 1969 © Duane Michals, Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York Death Comes to the Old Lady, 1969 © Duane Michals, Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York Death Comes to the Old Lady, 1969 © Duane Michals, Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York Death Comes to the Old Lady, 1969 © Duane Michals, Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York Death Comes to the Old Lady, 1969 © Duane Michals, Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York 2nd Prize Winner – B&H Photography Podcast Leica Photo Challenge – “Work & Dance from Home” © Ajay Raina, 2020 1st Prize Winner – B&H Photography Podcast Leica Photo Challenge – “Applause” © Karles Rives 2020 Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/30/2020
This week on the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome two old friends of the podcast to talk about the latest gear from their respective companies. First up is Rudy Winston, Technical Advisor at Canon USA, and then we welcome Marc Farb, Technical Rep from Sigma. Both Winston and Farb are breaking records with this, their fifth visit to our show. With Rudy Winston, we discuss a few cameras that were released last year or earlier in 2020, such as the Canon EOS 6D Mark II DSLR and the EOS 1D X Mark III DSLR, to get a sense of how they are being received, and then we briefly discuss what may be the most-anticipated camera of 2020, the upcoming EOS R5 Mirrorless Digital Camera. In addition, we talk about the latest Rebel T8i DSLR, CF Express memory cards, and the incredible RF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens. After a short break, we start our conversation with Marc Farb, discussing the impressive Sigma fp Mirrorless Camera, which was announced almost a year ago but has become the latest big deal for those wanting a compact full frame camera that can be the basis of both a complete photo or cine system. From there, we talk lenses. Sigma continues to produce incredible lenses in all categories and for most major camera systems, including the 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Lens for the Sony E system and the just-announced 16mm f/1.4 DC DN and 30mm f/1.4 DC DN for L-mount systems. After a quick mention of Sigma’s adapters and its new UD-11 USB Dock for Leica L-mount lenses, Farb relates an all-time favorite lens of his that is ideal for sports, wedding, and concert photographers, among others: the Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports Lens. Join us for this informative and practical discussion of the most interesting new gear from Canon and Sigma. Guests: Rudy Winston and Marc Farb Canon EOS 6D Mark II DSLR Camera Body with Accessory Kit Canon EOS 1D X Mark III DSLR Camera Canon EOS Rebel T8i DSLR Camera Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens Sigma fp Mirrorless Digital Camera Sigma 16mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary Lens Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Contemporary Lens for Sony E-mount Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports Lens Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/29/2020
I don’t know if we’ve ever had two photographers with such divergent styles on the same episode. It would make little sense to even have them on together, except that their individual work is exceptional, and they are married to each other. This week on the B&H Photography Podcast, we return to a format that has served us well in the past —speaking with a couple who both work in photography. We really hit the jackpot this time, with Sara Bennett and Joseph Holmes, not simply because they are interesting photographers and really nice folks but, between them, they embody a wide range of photo skills, from the technical and artistic, to the narrative and journalistic, from portraiture and art photography, to advocacy and social documentary. It’s quite an interesting situation and Holmes and Bennett, each in their own way, offer personal insight into their varied projects, and they also generously allow us a glimpse into how they work together as a couple, raising a family and supporting each other’s work. Sara Bennett’s photography, which has been published in the New York Times, Rolling Stone, and the PBS/News Hour, grew from her years working as a lawyer, primarily on cases related to battered women and the wrongly convicted. Her portraiture of women in prison and transitioning from incarceration humanizes as it advocates and educates. Her books, Life After Life in Prison, The Bedroom Project, and Looking Inside: Portraits of Women Serving Life Sentences, are beautiful and simple documents that serve a higher purpose, and we talk with Bennett about her intentions and the long process to find the right women to photograph and the complications and joys of photographing in prison. With Joseph Holmes, we start the conversation with New York City—and I don’t think we ever leave. Holmes could make a great image in a dark closet, but his work has such an understanding of our city and the subjects he has chosen to photograph—“ Cooks on Breaks,” “Urban Wilderness,” “Streit’s Matzoh Factory,” and “ Tracing the Underground,” are so New York, without ever touching the boiler plate. Blending portraiture, documentary, and street photography, Holmes’s dedication to the photo series and his technical aplomb represent the best of fine-art reportage. His work is represented by Jen Bekman Gallery, and pieces are included in the permanent collection of several museums, including the Lower East Side Tenement Museum and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Check out his photo annuals and enjoy this wonderful conversation as much as we did. Guests: Sara Bennett and Joseph Holmes Photograph © Joseph Holmes Karen, from “The Bedroom Project,” 2017 © Sara Bennett Traci, from “The Bedroom Project,” 2017 © Sara Bennett Jennifer, from “Looking Inside,” 2018 © Sara Bennett Sahiah, from “Looking Inside,” 2019 © Sara Bennett Patrice, from “Looking Inside,” 2018 © Sara Bennett Kat, from “Looking Inside,” 2019 © Sara Bennett from “Tracing the Underground,” 2017 © Joseph Holmes from “Tracing the Underground,” 2017 © Joseph Holmes from “Streit’s,” 2015 © Joseph Holmes from “Streit’s,” 2015 © Joseph Holmes Walter, from “Custom Machinery,” 2009 © Joseph Holmes Hugo, from “Custom Machinery,” 2009 © Joseph Holmes Bridgeport Vertical Milling Machine, 2009 © Joseph Holmes Van Norman Duplex Milling Machine, 2009 © Joseph Holmes Joseph O. Holmes and Sara Bennett © Allan Weitz Allan Weitz, Joseph O. Holmes, and Sara Bennett © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/26/2019
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome California-based advertising, sports, dance, and fashion photographer (and director), Alexis Cuarezma, who packs a considerable amount of practical and creative insight into our hour-long conversation. Ostensibly, Cuarezma was joining us to talk about his lighting techniques and, while he does dive deep into lighting schemes, we discuss so much more. Cuarezma is generous with is thoughts on production, composition, models, gear, self-promotion, and marketing really anything that he understands to help him in his burgeoning photo business. Just a glance at his work, and one will realize why Cuarezma is here to discuss lighting techniques, he has shot for Sports Illustrated (including six covers), Fortune magazine, Ring magazine, the New York Times, and his clients include Nike. Cuarezma emphasizes his belief that getting it right “in-camera” is the key to his success, not just for the sake of the final image, but for his creative process. Researching, planning, arriving early, being hands-on in every phase of the work, and understanding that your vision, when properly executed, will win over a client, is the other key to his success. With Cuarezma we discuss his decision-making process when creating a portrait; each of the small problems that needs to be solved to create the desired look that works best for his particular subject. While comfortable renting the needed gear to fulfill each project, he also discusses the gear he owns and uses, including Profoto B1 lights, Rosco Gels, and his Canon 5DS. Join us for this insightful and very educational episode. Guest: Alexis Cuarezma Photograph © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma Christine Shevchenko, American Ballet Theater © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma Hunter Strickland © Alexis Cuarezma Chris Paul © Alexis Cuarezma John Harris, Allan Weitz, Alexis Cuarezma, and Jason Tables © Jason Tawiah Previous Pause Next
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Posted 11/20/2019
Of course, there are several renowned photography book publishers, but if you know just one name in photo book publishing, it should be Aperture. Edward Weston, Diane Arbus, Stephen Shore, Sally Mann, Deana Lawson, and Martin Parr are just a few of the artists who have had at least one of their most significant books published by Aperture Publishing. Book publishing is just one of the ways that this non-profit organization, founded by Minor White and others, supports the art and craft of photography; they produce their quarterly magazine, host exhibitions, workshops, panel discussions, sponsor book and portfolio awards, and publish The PhotoBook Review and the Aperture blog. On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome Lesley Martin, Creative Director at Aperture and Publisher of The Photobook Review. Who better to speak about the process of photography-book publishing and, in general, the state of the photobook community today? With Martin, we discuss the important books from their 2019 catalog and how their editorial team decides which projects to publish each year, how large the runs will be and the costs associated with publishing in the US and abroad. We also examine what distinguishes Aperture—their non-profit status, the platform they create for artists, their collaborative philosophy, and the need to balance contemporary photo projects with compilation and themed photo books, classic editions and works about photography. We also ask about the impact of Amazon on their book trade and general questions on the current state of the photo-book business. In the second half of our show, we discuss the recently announced winners of the Paris Photo–Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards. This important award has three categories: Photography Catalogue of the Year, First PhotoBook of the Year, and Photobook of the Year. We ask about the criteria for judging in each category, about the subtle distinctions between a good photo series and a good photo book and clarify who can submit to the contest. Finally, we ask Martin about some of her personal dos and do nots when it comes creating your own photography book. This is a very enlightening conversation for those interested in creating a photobook and for anyone curious about what goes into running a successful editorial house. Guest: Lesley Martin “Brooklyn: The City Within” by Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb “Deana Lawson: An Aperture Monograph” by Deana Lawson, Essay by Zadie Smith “Immediate Family” by Sally Mann “Diane Arbus: An Aperture Monograph” Fortieth-anniversary edition by Diane Arbus “The New Black Vanguard: Photography between Art and Fashion” by Antwaun Sargent “Walter Chandoha: The Cat Photographer,” Interviews by David La Spina and Brittany Hudak “Border Cantos” by Richard Misrach Allan Weitz and Lesley Martin © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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