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Posted 11/05/2020
Our guest on this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is Sam Hurd. While he is primarily a wedding photographer, I have no doubt that he could photograph anything and make it look interesting. Hurd is also a portrait photographer, he dabbles in landscape work, and is a passionate photo educator. A few minutes listening to this episode and it becomes clear that he can articulate his process as well as he can execute it. He offers “deconstructions” of his images for his Patreon followers and teaches his style, technique, and gear, but today we focus on his “side hustles,” on the methods and platforms he uses to engage with clients and make extra money from the wedding photography he is already doing. We start by discussing his Patreon platform and how he uses his wedding photography images and insights to build a following of “patrons,” who pay monthly subscriptions to follow his tutorials. We then jump to Stocksy, and how his well-curated set of stock images, mostly taken at weddings, creates an additional revenue flow. He also speaks of DVLOP, which is a site that markets presets that he has created while processing his wedding work. Of course, each of these ancillary platforms flows into and out of each other not only to gain him clients but to improve his photography. He mentions several times how the challenge of producing interesting tutorials has forced him to be more inventive. Despite a very simple kit when shooting weddings, Hurd is also a self-described gearhead, and he and Allan bond over their love for vintage glass and discuss recent purchases, including the Hasselblad 907X 50C  and the Canon R6. Finally, we touch on Hurd’s first professional gig, as the staff photographer for the National Press Club, some of the famous faces he photographed, and the odd but practical practice techniques he developed to practice his portraiture. Join us for this very informative episode. Guest: Sam Hurd Photograph © Sam Hurd © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography George Clooney at the National Press Club © Sam Hurd Photography Mariska Hargitay at the National Press Club © Sam Hurd Photography Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/19/2020
This week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is a healthy set of conversations with gear representatives and camera experts from several of the major camera and lighting companies that we recorded at the 2020 Depth of Field Conference. First we speak with Steve Heiner, of Nikon, discussing that company’s new DSLRs, including the flagship D6 and the D780. We also ask about the mirrorless Z system cameras and new lenses for that system. Next up is Joe Edelman, of Olympus, to discuss his company’s new flagship, the OM-D E-M1 Mark III, and its incredible image stabilization system. Our next guest is Shar Taylor, from Profoto, and with her we discuss the A1 AirTTL Studio Light, the Air Remote TTL, as well as the popular Profoto B10 OCF Flash Head. After a short break, we welcome Casey Krugman, product develop from Luxli, to discuss the incredible LED light panels, including the new Taiko 2x1 RGBAW LED light. Our next guest is food photographer Chelsea Kyle, who joins us on behalf of Canon to discuss the gear she works with, including the Canon EOS 5DS DSLR. Canon has also just announced the new EOS R5 full-frame mirrorless camera and other lenses in development. It has also released the RF 24-105mm f/4-7.1 IS STM lens for its full-frame mirrorless system. Following our visit with Chelsea Kyle, we welcome Marc Farb, from Sigma, to update us on the latest news from the L-mount alliance and the Sigma fp Mirrorless Digital Camera. He also discusses new lenses, including the highly anticipated Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG DN Art lens for Sony E-mount cameras and the 14mm f/1.8 DG HSM Art lens from Leica L mount cameras. Our final guest is Jason Mantell, of Sony, who updates us on the latest from the Alpha mirrorless systems, including the Alpha a7R IV Mirrorless Digital Camera and the Alpha a9 II Mirrorless Digital Camera. Join us for this informative conversation. Guests: Steve Heiner, Joe Edelman, Shar Taylor, Casey Krugman, Chelsea Kyle, Marc Farb, and Jason Mantell Canon RF 24-105mm f/4-7.1 IS STM Lens Canon EOS Rebel T8i DSLR Camera Luxli Taiko 2x1 RGBAW LED Light Nikon D6 DSLR Camera Nikon D780 DSLR Camera Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III Mirrorless Digital Camera Profoto A1X AirTTL-C Studio Light Profoto Air Remote TTL-N Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG DN Art Lens for Sony E Sigma fp Mirrorless Digital Camera Sony Alpha a7R IV Mirrorless Digital Camera Sony Alpha a9 II Mirrorless Digital Camera Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/12/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome intellectual property attorney David Deal back to the program to discuss issues regarding copyright infringement, particularly as they involve three high-profile cases in which he is involved. Deal spoke with us last year about a case he had just litigated, Brammer vs Violent Hues Productions, in which he successfully argued to reverse a lower court’s decision, thus protecting his client’s photograph from copyright infringement. While it was a relatively small case, the decision carried positive ramifications for photographers and should stand as precedent going forward. Deal provides a summary of why that case is so important to photographers. He also brings us up to speed on a high-profile case in which he represents many possible heirs to the copyright of Vivian Maier’s photo catalogue. On the second half of our show, we will speak with Deal about the current case in which he is involved, regarding the estate of noted rural portrait photographer Mike Disfarmer  1884–1959). This conversation will serve as an introduction to a serial segment we will record with David Deal over the coming months about the Disfarmer images. Disfarmer’s work is well known and sought after in the art world, but the question remains as to who are the rightful heirs of his work and whether they have been properly compensated. Because his images have been reproduced and sold for many years by various vendors, the case is complicated, and Deal walks us through the issues surrounding this fascinating photographer and case, which involves heroes and villains from small-town Arkansas to big-city New York. Keep your eyes (and ears) open for the future segments of this series as Deal and his team work through the many layers of research and legal briefs, hopefully to sort out the legal entanglements and set the record straight. Guest: David Deal Photograph © Mike Disfarmer All photos in this carousel © Mike Disfarmer Previous Pause Next Mike Disfarmer Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/26/2019
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome California-based advertising, sports, dance, and fashion photographer (and director), Alexis Cuarezma, who packs a considerable amount of practical and creative insight into our hour-long conversation. Ostensibly, Cuarezma was joining us to talk about his lighting techniques and, while he does dive deep into lighting schemes, we discuss so much more. Cuarezma is generous with is thoughts on production, composition, models, gear, self-promotion, and marketing really anything that he understands to help him in his burgeoning photo business. Just a glance at his work, and one will realize why Cuarezma is here to discuss lighting techniques, he has shot for Sports Illustrated (including six covers), Fortune magazine, Ring magazine, the New York Times, and his clients include Nike. Cuarezma emphasizes his belief that getting it right “in-camera” is the key to his success, not just for the sake of the final image, but for his creative process. Researching, planning, arriving early, being hands-on in every phase of the work, and understanding that your vision, when properly executed, will win over a client, is the other key to his success. With Cuarezma we discuss his decision-making process when creating a portrait; each of the small problems that needs to be solved to create the desired look that works best for his particular subject. While comfortable renting the needed gear to fulfill each project, he also discusses the gear he owns and uses, including Profoto B1 lights, Rosco Gels, and his Canon 5DS. Join us for this insightful and very educational episode. Guest: Alexis Cuarezma Photograph © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma Christine Shevchenko, American Ballet Theater © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma Hunter Strickland © Alexis Cuarezma Chris Paul © Alexis Cuarezma John Harris, Allan Weitz, Alexis Cuarezma, and Jason Tables © Jason Tawiah Previous Pause Next
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Posted 08/21/2019
Shiv Verma is a Panasonic LUMIX Global Ambassador, so it’s no coincidence that he is joining us to discuss the LUMIX S1 Full-Frame Mirrorless Digital Camera —which is part of our current sweepstakes —and other cameras in the LUMIX line, but Verma is also a multi-talented photographer and educator who offers insight into the subtle aspects of light and narrative, as well as the technical know-how to achieve your desired photographic results. We start our conversation relating a William Faulkner quote that Verma uses on his website, and this leads us to speculate on the nature of photography and how images can tell stories and inspire emotion. From there, we dig into Verma’s body of work to understand more clearly the threads that connect his range of styles and abilities. What connects his wildlife and bird photography to his landscapes and the professional and technical product photography he creates? We also delve into the skill sets needed for macro photography and his specialty… time-lapse photography. In-camera time-lapse capabilities were what initially drew Verma to the LUMIX line, and we discuss how this function has evolved and, in addition to relating his experience shooting with the LUMIX S1 and S1R cameras, he provides insight into the best applications for the various LUMIX mirrorless cameras and lenses, including the GH5 and G9. Join us for this informative episode and enter our B&H Photography Podcast Panasonic LUMIX S1 Sweepstakes for a chance to win an S1 with 24-105mm lens or a DC-G95 Mirrorless Camera with a 12-60mm lens. Guest: Shiv Verma Above photograph © Shiv Verma Palouse Sunset © Shiv Verma Palouse Sunrise © Shiv Verma Notre Dame Cathedral © Shiv Verma Fire in the Mist © Shiv Verma Red-Shouldered Hawk © Shiv Verma Vietnamese Elder © Shiv Verma Light House Steps © Shiv Verma Allan Weitz and Shiv Verma © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/17/2019
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome photographer Ashok Sinha, who talks about his forthcoming book, Driver-full City: The Unique Architecture of Car Culture in Greater Los Angeles, and discusses the Cartwheel Initiative, a nonprofit that he founded, which works with displaced and refugee youth, using photography and multimedia tools to inspire these youth to find their voice through art and creative thinking. Above photograph © Ashok Sinha Before we get into our conversation with Sinha, however, we want to let you know about an opportunity we are offering our listeners. We will be giving away forty free tickets to a private screening of the film, Jay Myself, directed by photographer Stephen Wilkes, about the photographer Jay Maisel. Wilkes will be in attendance for a Q/A session after the screening. Many of you may remember when Maisel and Wilkes joined us to talk about the making of this movie, and we are excited to extend this offer to the first forty listeners who request a ticket. This screening will be in New York City, on August 4, so if you cannot be in New York on that date, please do not request a ticket, which are limited to two per person. If you would like to attend the screening and meet the filmmakers, send a request to podcast@bhphoto.com or join our B&H Photography Podcast Facebook Group and comment on the post regarding the free screening. Screening details are in the post and we look forward to meeting you. Ashok Sinha is a complete photographer and filmmaker, able to make a living from his architecture and interior design photography, but also adept at large-scale landscapes, human-interest editorial stories, and portraiture. His photographs have been widely published by editorial outlets such as The New York Times, TIME, Interior Design, and exhibited by The Museum of the City of New York, the International Center of Photography, and The Royal Photographic Society. And, as mentioned, Sinha has found a wonderful way to use photography to give back to the youth most in need of a helping hand. Join us for this inspiring episode and request your free tickets to Jay Myself. Guest: Ashok Sinha “Driver-full City” © Ashok Sinha “Driver-full City” © Ashok Sinha “Driver-full City” © Ashok Sinha “Driver-full City” © Ashok Sinha “Driver-full City” © Ashok Sinha Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/26/2019
Today’s conversations address the challenges photographers encounter when “real life”—children, family, economic changes, even personal tragedy—interrupt the work we would like to be doing, namely taking pictures, and how we find our way back to the form of creative expression we all desire. Above Photograph © @afueravida We welcome four photographers who have overcome challenges or who have found ways to incorporate their own life and lifestyle into their professional work. First, we speak with photographer Erin Babnik, who previously joined us to talk about the tech she uses in her landscape photography, but now tells of her recent brush with tragedy when her new home and studio was engulfed by the deadly 2018 Camp Wildfire, in Paradise, California. Next, we are joined by Sofia Aldinio and Colin Boyd, of AfueraVida.com, who have decided to take their business on the road, quite literally. Not wanting the typical white picket fence and two-car garage lifestyle, they are retrofitting an old fire department van and taking their two young children on an epic journey from Maine to Argentina, all along, photographing for clients who love their real-life family adventure content. After a break, we welcome National Geographic Explorer and Grantee Erika Skogg to discuss her project on Scandinavian-American culture. After years spent traveling the world with her camera, Skogg decided it was time to return to her Wisconsin hometown to live. It wasn’t long before she turned her documentarian’s eye to her own culture and heritage and created a beautiful series on the traditions she knows so well. Finally, we’ll be joined by Carissa Pelleteri, who has published two books on the people of Montauk, NY. “Car” is a Brooklyn native who, after years of vacationing in Montauk, began to notice the changes happening to her beloved getaway. Her books are visual records of the town’s transition from bucolic fishing village to an oft-crowded tourist destination at the eastern end of Long Island. Join us for this intriguing set of conversations, recorded at the 2019 OPTIC Photography Conference. Guests: Erin Babnik, Sofia Aldinio, Colin Boyd, Erika Skogg, and Car Pelleteri Arrow Dynamic © Erin Babnik Silver Lining © Erin Babnik Gold Rush © Erin Babnik High Sodium © Erin Babnik © Erika Skogg, project funded by the National Geographic Society © Erika Skogg, project funded by the National Geographic Society © Erika Skogg, project funded by the National Geographic Society © Erika Skogg, project funded by the National Geographic Society from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri © @afueravida © @afueravida © @afueravida © @afueravida Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/22/2019
Adriane Ohanesian has been on the B&H Photography Podcast in the past and we are very excited to welcome her back to discuss her photojournalistic work in Africa. As many of our listeners will recall, Ohanesian contributed to our podcast throughout 2017 in a serial segment we called “ Dispatch,” in which she provided monthly reports on her freelance assignments covering conflict and climate change in Sudan and Somalia. She also narrated the story of a deadly attack she survived while covering a story on illegal mining in Congo. It was a harrowing and tragic account that demonstrates the lengths to which photojournalists will go to cover a story. On today’s episode, Ohanesian updates us on a few of the items we discussed in 2017, including the illegal mining story and her assignment on the last white male rhinoceros in existence, which has since died. She also talks about a recent assignment for National Geographic, covering illegal mining and deforestation in Madagascar, and her work back in Congo covering an Ebola outbreak. In addition, Ohanesian provides insight into her life as a freelance photojournalist, reflects on incorporating video and audio into her workflow to get important stories told, and offers tips on the gear she uses for her arduous and often very remote assignments. Adriane Ohanesian is a respected photojournalist living in Nairobi and covering news stories throughout East Africa. Her coverage of the civil war in South Sudan garnered her a 2016 World Press Photo Award and she is also the recipient of the 2016 Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award. Join us for this compelling and inspirational episode. Guest: Adriane Ohanesian Marcellina, (center), who survived the militia attack, stands at attention over the grave of her colleague, Antopo Selemani, during the funeral of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve rangers outside of the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 17, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian Okapi Wildlife Reserve park rangers help to lower the body of their young porter, Lokana Tingiti, into the ground during the funeral of the rangers outside of the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 17, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian A woman cries over the grave of Léopold Ngbekusa during the funeral of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve rangers, outside of the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 17, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian Two men who were caught with eight diamonds, and who were mining inside of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve, were arrested and held by park rangers at their headquarters, in the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 12, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian Men shovel and pump water at the Bemainty sapphire mining site, inside of the Ankeniheny- Zahamena Corridor (CAZ), a protected area in Madagascar. Beginning in 2015, when the sapphire rush was first underway, this section quickly became a threat to the rain forest’s flora and fauna, July 29, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Diego Salimoali, age 37, stands with a pet brown lemur as he watches men work in the largest sapphire mining site in Bemainty, July 29, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Laurence Asma, age 41, shows off sapphires that she, her husband, and team of about twenty workers found in the largest mining site in Bemainty, inside of the Ankeniheny- Zahamena Corridor (CAZ), a protected area in Madagascar, July 28, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Roki, a black-and-white ruffed lemur, and Bridola, a brown lemur, are kept as pets in the back of a restaurant and shop, in a community of artisanal gold and sapphire miners living in Ambodipaiso, inside of the Ankeniheny- Zahamena Corridor (CAZ), a protected area in Madagascar, July 29, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Healthcare workers pause for a photo as they finish dressing in their Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) at the beginning of the morning shift at the treatment center, in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic in North Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 5, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Ebola survivor and "Guardian of the Ill," Pamela Kiyangaliya, age 33, gets dressed in her Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) as she prepares to start her morning shift at the treatment center, in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic in North Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 5, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Ebola responders with an armed police escort run with one of two coffins to be buried at the cemetery, on a hill in Butembo, in North Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. The responders have been a frequent target in attacks by community members and militias, March 6, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal The cemetery where Pamela Kiyangaliya’s sister is buried with many others who died from Ebola, on a hill above Butembo, Democratic Republic of Congo. According to the World Health Organization, there have been 848 confirmed cases and 509 confirmed deaths in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, March 6, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/28/2019
Is it necessary to be funny to create work with humor, what is the line between humor and discomfort, can art that is funny have a serious message? How does Instagram success translate to the real world? These are some of the questions we address in this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, and while “humor in art” is our starting point, the conversation takes its own life and we touch on a range of subjects, including the role of Instagram for artists, how to sustain a creative idea, the discrepancy between intent and reception, and how to scale work for both a small screen and a gallery. With these ideas on the table, I cannot think of two better guests with whom to have a conversation. Mitra Saboury and Ben Zank are both artists who explore very personal spheres with their photo and video work, and both incorporate humor and playfulness to express their worldview—and as a portal to explore thornier themes. Ben Zank’s deceptively simple, wonderfully composed images, often with himself as model, explore the body’s relationship with its found environment. Placing a model in a sewer, a pothole, a basketball hoop, or under the yellow lines of the highway, Zank creates an, at times awkward, at times harmonious exchange. The almost self-deprecating humor belies a confident control of purpose and a delicate view of the human form. The imaginative work of Mitra Saboury, whether alone or in collaboration with Meatwreck, explores the physical and psychological effects of our quotidian toils. Like Zank, there is much humor in her work, but a persistent challenging of norms and questioning of beliefs runs through her photography, video, performance, and installation art. Some pieces are discomforting, but strength through inquiry and vulnerability lay at their core. Her work has been exhibited throughout the world, most recently at the Spring Break Art Fair, in Los Angeles, but she also thrives on Instagram and encourages audience participation, whether in person or in the semi-anonymity of the Web. Join us for this interesting conversation, organized by Cory Rice, and check out his portrait of Ben Zank in our “What is Photography?” series. Guests: Mitra Saboury, Ben Zank, Cory Rice Snackbreak © Meatwreck Wavy © Meatwreck Cheescake © Meatwreck Nail Spa © Mitra Saboury Found Face © Mitra Saboury Soap Sink © Mitra Saboury 355 © Ben Zank Daily Commute © Ben Zank Bottleneck © Ben Zank Nuclear Witness © Ben Zank Ben Zank © John Harris Mitra Saboury © John Harris Mitra Saboury, Allan Weitz, Ben Zank, and Cory Rice © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/03/2019
As a companion to last week’s end-of-year review episode, and as a way of kicking off the new year, we will discuss our own photographic new year’s resolutions and gear wish lists on today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. As our most ardent listeners know, Allan, Jason, and I have wildly different photographic styles and our gear bags reflect those styles. We will start by talking about the photo-related goals that we each have for the coming year. Perhaps inspired by some of the guests we have had on the show this year, or our “What is Photography?” project, I have a couple of long-delayed projects to which I'd like to return, Jason is looking to continue his long-exposure work with urban cityscapes, and Allan is going to dig back into his film archive to digitize long-hidden gems. We will talk a bit about our current work and the techniques we want to improve this year and, after a short break, we will talk a bit about gear. Going around the table, we will discuss what we are currently shooting with and what new (or used) gear we may purchase to help us achieve our new year’s goals. Allan will start by describing the “Franken-slide copier” that he built with a Micro-NIKKOR 55mm lens, a Bolt Macro Light, and his trusty Sony a7R II. Jason is looking to experiment with long telephoto lenses, such as the Sony FE 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 GM OSS lens and a new 3 Legged Thing tripod, and I want to get back to my street photography roots with a fixed-lens camera such as the Fujifilm X100F or one of the Ricoh GR series cameras. While we do talk gear, this episode is mostly about our shared passions for photography and keeping creativity an important part of our 2019. What photography goals do you have for the coming year? Allan Weitz's "Franken-slide Copier" Beal's Island, Maine- 35mm slide image digitized by the "Franken-slide Copier" © Allan Weitz Beal's Island, Maine- 35mm slide image digitized by the "Franken-slide Copier" © Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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