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Posted 09/09/2021
What do the films Goodfellas, The Devil Wears Prada, Creed, Ocean’s 8, and Die Hard with a Vengeance have in common? The poster art, publicity, and behind-the-scenes photography for these and about one hundred other feature films were made by photographer Barry Wetcher, and we welcome Wetcher to this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. On-set still photography or, simply, “still photography” is one of the more unique jobs found under the big tent that is photography. The skills needed to excel in this work incorporate abilities from many photographic genres. Portraiture, documentary, news, action, and still life talents are all called upon to create the images needed for varied purposes, but perhaps the most important skill is the ability to understand the many moving parts and dynamic personalities of a film shoot and to find a way to be everywhere but nowhere at the same time. With Wetcher, we talk about the specific demands of the craft, about the evolution of gear from film to DSLR and, ultimately, to mirrorless (Nikon and FUJIFILM, in Wetcher’s case), and mostly about how to best navigate the world of producers, directors, cinematographers, and actors to create the seemingly ephemeral but truly indelible images of movie history. We also find time to ask Wetcher about some of the legendary actors and directors he has photographed over the years. Join us for this enjoyable and informative chat with Wetcher and, as it turns out, his “Brooklyn Brother,” host Allan Weitz. Guest: Barry Wetcher Photograph © Barry Wetcher Chadwick Boseman in “Marshall,” 2017 © Barry Wetcher/Open Road Films Human Green Screen from “I Am Legend,” 2007 © Barry Wetcher/Warner Bros. Pictures James Gandolfini in “Not Fade Away,” 2012 © Barry Wetcher/Paramount Vantage Joe Pesci in “GoodFellas,” 1990 © Barry Wetcher/ Warner Bros. Pictures Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 02/11/2021
When we started the B&H Photography Podcast more than six years ago, the concept was “watercooler conversations” with photographers, about gear. Well, honestly, it hasn’t always turned out that way, but this episode with famed photojournalist David Burnett comes as close to that idea as any we have done; there’s barely an edit in the whole episode. Burnett joins us, and we just talk. We begin with his coverage of the recent presidential inauguration and his decision to use a 1930 Graflex 4 x 5 camera in addition to his Sony mirrorless with an FE 100-400mm lens. Burnett reflects on the reasons he incorporates vintage cameras and lenses into his workflow and the need to challenge your own point of view as a photographer. We discuss the motivations that bring a particular camera to his eye and his sense of “obligation to all that has come before.” In the second half of the show, we talk about using legacy glass on mirrorless cameras and the relentless (and at times “goofy”) experimentation that both Burnett (and Allan) enjoy. From aerial reconnaissance lenses to old Kodak cine lenses, there is nothing that can’t be adapted, and we go into the weeds to discuss some of the many, many lenses Burnett has not just tried, but used successfully for his professional assignments. We also ask about the new Sony Alpha 1, the benefits of customizable functions, and his preference for the Sony a9 II and a6600 cameras. Join us for this easy-going conversation. Guest: David Burnett Photograph © David Burnett A soldier with a letter from home, Lang Vei, Vietnam, 1971 © 2020 David Burnett/Contact Press Images Bob Marley, 1976 © 2020 David Burnett/Contact Press Images Al Gore on the presidential campaign trail, 2001 © David Burnett/ Contact Press Images John Kerry in the last days of the presidential campaign, Manchester, New Hampshire, 2004 © David Burnett /Contact Press Images Daniel Céspedes arrested by the Chilean military, 1973 © 2020 David Burnett/Contact Press Images Ayatollah Khomeini, spiritual leader of the Iran Revolution, 1979 © 2020 David Burnett/Contact Press Images Mary Decker looks on in pain after colliding with Zola Budd and falling during the 3000-meter race at the 1984 Olympics, in Los Angeles © 2020 David Burnett/Contact Press Images Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/08/2020
During a little holiday trip, producer John Harris made a visit to the gallery and studio of photographer Clyde Butcher. For anyone who grew up in Florida, Butcher’s work should be very familiar; his photography is often found on the walls of local libraries, municipal buildings, and, as Miami native Jason Tables points out, “every doctor’s office I’ve ever been in.” Butcher’s images of the Florida landscapes, particularly of the Everglades, are legendary, and although he has a brisk print-sales business, many of the photos in libraries have the attached placard, “Donated by Clyde Butcher.” Although he is known primarily for his large format black-and-white photography of “the swamp,” Butcher’s photographic career extends back many decades and includes architectural photography, mountain and western landscapes, filmed documentaries, and decorative color photography. Interestingly, Butcher began his career selling prints at small art fairs and, in the 1970s, he had a thriving business selling thousands of prints through department stores such as Sears and Montgomery Ward. This episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is a casual conversation that glides through several topics, including Butcher’s work with large format cameras, his recent foray into Sony digital cameras paired with Canon tilt-shift lenses, the incredible set of vintage enlargers in his giant darkroom space, the business models he and his family employ to market his images, water conservation, and, of course, his relationship to the Florida landscape for which he will be forever linked. Join us for this conversation with a true master. Guest: Clyde Butcher Above photograph © Clyde Butcher Tamiani Trail © Clyde Butcher Cigar Orchid Pond © Clyde Butcher Ochopee © Clyde Butcher Big Cypress © Clyde Butcher Moonrise © Clyde Butcher Plaja-S’Arenella-with-Boat, from Salvador Dali series © Clyde Butcher Cadaques, from Salvador Dali series © Clyde Butcher Cap-de-Creus, from Salvador Dali series © Clyde Butcher Clocks by Clyde Butcher circa, 1970s © Clyde Butcher Clyde Butcher and John Harris © Niki Butcher Niki and Clyde Butcher © John Harris Clyde Butcher in his Venice, Florida office © John Harris Butcher workshop and darkroom, 2019 © John Harris Niki Butcher with enlarger, 2019 © John Harris Clyde Butcher in Movie Dome with 11 x 14" view camera © Clyde Butcher Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/07/2019
At the B&H Depth of Field Wedding and Portrait Conference, being held this week in New York, we were fortunate to sit down with a straight-up legend— Albert Watson. It would be hard to overstate his accomplishments as a photographer, and his ability to master a range of photographic genres—from fashion and advertising to still life, fine art, and reportage—is uncanny. He has shot more than 100 Vogue covers, 40 covers for Rolling Stone, and created iconic images of Steve Jobs, Mick Jagger, Alfred Hitchcock, David Bowie, a nude Kate Moss, and a properly clothed Queen Elizabeth, who later bestowed upon Watson an Order of the British Empire (OBE) for “services to photography.” On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we present our conversation with Watson, which also serves as an intro to future episodes, which will present a sampling of conversations we held with other wedding and portrait photographers at the Depth of Field Conference. Join us for this inspiring conversation and subscribe on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Overcast, and Stitcher for all upcoming episodes.  Guest: Albert Watson Albert Watson on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Albert Watson on the B&H Photography Podcast at the 2019 Depth of Field Conference © John Harris Allan Weitz and Albert Watson © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/19/2018
In less than an hour, this podcast will teach you everything you need to know about night photography. Seriously. While our show is not a tutorial, the conversation is so broad and so deep; it touches upon every aspect of the craft. Guests Gabriel Biderman and Todd Vorenkamp blanket this subject with an engaging and humorous tone—from the psychological predisposition common to night shooters and the science of rods and cones to cameras, gear, apps and a recipe for creating images of star trails. This is truly an episode for all levels of shutterbugs seeking to explore or master image making at night. Well done guys! Guests: Gabriel Biderman and Todd Vorenkamp To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. Thank you for joining our journey into night photography! For more Visualizing the Night content, please click here: Visualizing The Night and share your enthusiasm for the art below in the comments section or reach out to us on social media using #visualizethenight. Thanks for reading!       Photos by Todd Vorenkamp www.trvphoto.com    Photos by Gabriel Biderman www.ruinism.com b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/23/2018
We are delighted, at the B&H Photography Podcast, to present our chat with acclaimed portrait photographer Chris Buck. Buck is an in-demand celebrity and advertising photographer, but he also maintains ongoing personal projects, such as his current series, “Gentleman’s Club.” We speak with him on a range of topics, from concept development, shooting technique, and gear, to editing decisions and self-publishing. With a flexible yet unmistakable style that blends insight, a touch of dry, almost absurdist humor, and a pinch of the darkness within, Buck has photographed a host of luminaries from the worlds of film, music, and politics, including four of our last five Presidents. His most recent book, Uneasy, is a 30-year compendium of incredible portraits; we discuss the making of this book and, of course, some of his most recognized images. We also speak with Buck about process: his “three tiers of ideas,” thoughts on humor, his adjustment to digital photography, and DSLR versus medium format. In this wide-ranging conversation, Buck opines on his relationship with subjects, the nature of portraiture, his influences from pop culture and photography, and how “being relaxed and having fun are the enemies of a good Chris Buck photo.” Guest: Chris Buck Barack Obama, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Elvis Costello, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck George McGovern, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Leonard Cohen, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Philip Seymour Hoffman and John C. Reilly, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Steve Martin, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Steve Martin, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck William F. Buckley, from the book, "Uneasy" © Chris Buck Jonathan Millet, from the "Gentleman’s Club" series © Chris Buck Vincent Rodriguez, from the "Gentleman’s Club" series © Chris Buck Chris Buck on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Allan Weitz and Chris Buck © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence
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Posted 09/15/2017
Canon has recently announced the addition of three new tilt-shift lenses to its lineup, a relatively big deal for a type of lens often considered merely a tool for architecture photography. The truth is that tilt-shift lenses are used in many photographic applications, from landscape to portraiture, and their creative possibilities are limitless. Also, with this release, Canon has expanded the format to include a TS-E 135mm lens, pushing the boundaries of what can be achieved with perspective-control optics. Using this news as the keystone, we have built an episode of the B&H Photography Podcast around tilt-shift and perspective-control lenses. We discuss the history and general principles of these types of lenses, as well as their common (and not so common) applications. We explain the difference between tilt and shift and address the fact that perspective corrections can now be made in post-production and, despite that, the value that in-camera control offers. We wrap up with an inventory of the many tilt-shift lenses available from B&H, including those from Nikon, Canon, Schneider and Rokinon, as well as those available in the used market and those for medium format cameras. Join us for this informative discussion and let us know about your most valued tilt-shift lens and what you photograph with it, in the Comments section, below. Guest: Todd Vorenkamp DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/17/2017
For this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we replace the camera in our hand with a game controller, but if artistic interpretation of your surroundings is the goal, is there any difference between the two? Today, we talk gaming and photography and, specifically, the practice of in-game or virtual photography. While grabbing a screenshot of your high score is nothing new, using a gaming system’s increasingly advanced photo tools to capture images of the gaming world in which you are immersed is becoming a discipline unto itself. For sure, some gamers are still looking to show off their accomplishments and share them with fellow gamers, but others approach it as a landscape photographer, documentarian or combat photographer might, utilizing light and exposure controls to create dramatic images that showcase or even surpass those created by the game itself. We are joined today by our in-house gaming expert, Akeem Addy, as well as Tobias Andersson, Senior Producer of the Hunter: Call of the Wild, by Avalanche Studios, and two gamers who have explored in-game photography from distinctive perspectives, photographer Leo Sang and artist Eron Rauch. We also take time to talk a bit about the history of in-game photography and suggest games with some of the strongest photo tools. The debate about whether this is “real” photography will rage on. However, our guests are over that, not only creating beautiful and interesting photos, but elevating the dialogue to create images that question the relationship between the virtual and the “work-a-day” world. Join us for this multi-faceted episode and let us know your thoughts on gaming and photography—and even share with us your best images on Twitter @BHPhotoVideo with #BhPhotoPodcast. Guests: Akeem Addy, Tobias Andersson, Leo Sang, and Eron Rauch © Battlefield 1 Image by Leo Sang © Battlefield 1 Image by Leo Sang © Ghost Recon: Wildlands Image by Leo Sang © Grand Theft Auto V Image by Leo Sang Made with NVIDIA Ansel Image by Leo Sang From the series A Land to Die In by Eron Rauch From the Series A Land to Die In by Eron Rauch From the series A Land to Die In by Eron Rauch From the series Arcana by Eron Rauch From the series Valhalla Nocturnes by Eron Rauch © theHunter: Call of the Wild, courtesy Avalanche Studios © theHunter: Call of the Wild, courtesy Avalanche Studios © theHunter: Call of the Wild, courtesy Avalanche Studios © theHunter: Call of the Wild, courtesy Avalanche Studios Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/14/2016
Are dance and photography natural enemies? Well, of course not, but one art form is about the still, captured moment, and the other about choreographed movement and fluidity. However, anyone who truly understands photography knows the importance of timing, grace, and harmony, and a dancer must also recognize the relevance of rest and static. Sculpture, or gesture perhaps, is their common bond and our two guests know well the significance of gesture and the conflicting and compatible characteristics of dance and photography. They join us to talk about their distinct work and shooting styles. Lois Greenfield is one of the recognized masters of the craft, having developed a singular style sought by the world’s most renowned dance companies, and Omar Z Robles, an official Fujifilm X-Photographer, brings a fresh take, blending aspects of documentary and street photography. Enjoy this episode as we discuss improvisation, inspiration, dodging taxis and, of course, lighting systems and camera and lens choices. Guests: Lois Greenfield and Omar Z. Robles   Photographs by ©  Lois Greenfield Photographs by ©  Omar Z. Robles   Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play           Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/16/2016
The OPTIC 2016 Imaging Conference provided numerous opportunities to talk with some of the most respected nature and landscape photographers working today, but the highlights of our two days at OPTIC had to be our chat with Michael Kenna, the event’s keynote presenter, and our conversation with Paul and John Paul Caponigro. It is unnecessary to summarize the work of these three photographers in any quick description but, suffice it to say, each is a master of his craft. While their work is distinctive and unique, it was wonderful to hear of their common vision, approach—and yes, spirituality—and for this reason, we present their conversations together. With Kenna we spoke of process, why he sticks with medium format film photography and what motivates and inspires his work. With the Caponigros, we touched upon the spirit of art, how to communicate with nature and, with Father’s Day in mind, how to let a child discover his or her own path to artistic expression. Join us for these two inspirational conversations. Photographs © Paul Caponigro (left) and John Paul Caponigro  Guests:  Michael Kenna (1:30-30:05), Paul and John Paul Caponigro (31:00-57:10)   Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play. Michael Kenna, Jason Tables, Allan Weitz John Harris Paul Caponigro, John Paul Caponigro, Jason Tables, Allan Weitz, John Harris Dana Glidden b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Lawrence Neves
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