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Posted 04/22/2021
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we focus on the work of photographer Todd Webb and, specifically, the series of images he created in Africa in 1958, while on assignment for the United Nations. We are joined by Betsy Evans Hunt, the Executive Director of the Todd Webb Archive, and by Aimée Bessire and Erin Hyde Nolan, coauthors of the new book, Todd Webb in Africa—Outside the Frame. With our guests, we discuss the photographic career of Todd Webb, including his work in New York and Paris in the 1940s and 1950s, and the founding and mission of the Todd Webb Archive. Our primary topic, however, is the rediscovery (in a steamer trunk) and eventual archiving and publishing of Webb’s photographs taken in several African nations over the course of a multi-month assignment organized by the United Nations. The images are notable not only for their fateful recovery but for their large and medium format color composition and intelligent eye; they tell a vibrant story of Africa at a moment between colonization and independence. With authors Bessire and Nolan, we discuss the making of their book, which is both a photography book of unique vision and a multifaceted study of the images themselves, with essays and interviews providing historical context and cultural and artistic analysis. Join us for this conversation on the work of an overlooked 20th-century master photographer and on a sweeping series of color photos that sat unseen for almost 60 years. Guests: Betsy Evans Hunt, Aimée Bessire, and Erin Hyde Nolan Photograph © Todd Webb Cover, “Todd Webb in Africa – Outside the Frame” © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 03/25/2021
What is street photography? Is it an urban exercise? Is it black-and-white or color? Is it collaborative or solitary? Can it be an intimate portrait or a long-term project? These are some of the questions we ask of our guest on today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. And Gulnara Samoilova does not take the bait. Samoilova is interested in expanding street photography, not limiting it with a definition. To her, and as is represented beautifully by the new book she edited, street photography is all of the above—it can happen anywhere, and it is simply “unplanned photos taken in public places.” In addition to be being an editor and curator and the founder of the @womenstreetphotographers Instagram feed, Samoilova is an accomplished photographer herself, and we spend the first half of the show talking street photo practices and how she uses verbal and nonverbal communication to interact with subjects, how she holds the camera, and how a location may affect the style of a photo. She also mentions that she has been a FUJIFILM X  shooter for some time. In the second half of the show, we focus on Women Street Photographers, the new book edited by Samoilova, which profiles one hundred street photographers from around the world, and we find out how this book was edited and produced and about some of the photographers included. Join us for this insightful discussion. Guest: Gulnara Samoilova Photograph © Gulnara Samoilova Myanmar © Gulnara Samoilova New York City © Gulnara Samoilova Ufa, Bashkiria © Gulnara Samoilova © Gulnara Samoilova Cover, Women Street Photographers edited by Gulnara Samoilova © Prestel Verlag, Munich London New York, 2020. “Untitled”; From Women Street Photographers, © Nina Welch-King, 2018 “A Dance of Joy”; From Women Street Photographers, © Regula Tschumi, 2019 “Tokyo Smokers”; From Women Street Photographers, © Hazel Hankin, 2007 “A Night Bus in Kolkota, India”; © Emily Garthwaite, 2017 “The Serpentine”; From Women Street Photographers, © Efrat Sela, 2007 “Sleeping Beauty”; From Women Street Photographers, © Elena Alexandra, 2019 “Materic Water #1”; From Women Street Photographers, © Bruna Rotunno, 2011 Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 01/14/2021
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, photographer Matt Price describes skate photography as the “perfect blend between studio and sports photography” and, from our engaging conversation, this idea will be made clear. Price knows of what he speaks—in addition to an acclaimed freelance career, he has been a staff photographer and editor for The Skateboard Mag and is currently Brand Director at CCS Skateshop and creates the magazine, Golden Hours Skateboarding. Price has lost more than one lens to the rigors of his craft, and we talk with him about getting close to skateboarders with a fish-eye lens, as well as other shooting and lighting techniques. We also discuss how he fell in love with skating and, at a very young age, began to submit his work to forums and, ultimately, to editors. He admits to taking his lumps from online critics for his early work, but his passion for skating and desire to improve his photo craft provided the courage and commitment to keep going and, eventually, his “energy-based” photo style caught the eye of editors and brands who sent him around the world to cover the skate scene. We discuss many topics in this easygoing conversation, from skating techniques to the business of skateboard photography to the differences between the various skate publications. We also get into the relationship between skater and photographer and how such a niche photo style has grown to influence a range of disciplines. Finally, we talk about gear choices and what has worked for Price. Starting with a Canon Rebel that he purchased with money his grandmother helped him secure, Price has worked with Hasselblad and Sony systems, but is currently back where he started, shooting with a Canon EOS 5D Mark IV and the Canon EF 8-15mm f/4L lens. Guest: Matt Price Photographs © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price © Matt Price Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/24/2020
I think most photographers have tried to document their experience during the COVID-19 shutdown, but none have done it quite like Neil Kramer. Kramer is riding out the pandemic in a two-bedroom apartment in Queens, New York, with his 86-year-old mother and his ex-wife. Did I mention that this is the apartment in which he grew up…and that he is living with his mother and his ex-wife? Kramer has become the star of his own drama and aptly describes the process of creating this series as “part art, part desperation.” Perfectly fitting. Kramer is primarily a street and portrait photographer with a healthy Instagram following and editorial or assignment gigs, but when the streets emptied in early March, he turned to his unlikely living situation for inspiration. Initially, there was humor and novelty in his images; he enlisted his “roommates” as players, and eventually as collaborators, in these one-shot dramas. As the weeks and months passed, his diaristic Instagram feed went from funny shots of faux-fights and crowded bathrooms to more introspective and isolated posts, complete with tender and insightful commentary. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Kramer about developing this project, about “learning to take a photo when I’m not behind the camera,” about tethering, lighting, and bribing his “cast and crew” with doughnuts. Join us for this Seinfeldian chat, which might just help us keep our humor and creative spirit alive during the most difficult of situations. Guest: Neil Kramer Photograph © Neil Kramer Quarantine in Queens, Day 11. © Neil Kramer Quarantine in Queens, Day 12. © Neil Kramer Quarantine in Queens, Day 26. © Neil Kramer Quarantine in Queens, Day 49. © Neil Kramer Quarantine in Queens, Day 70. © Neil Kramer Quarantine in Queens, Day 85. © Neil Kramer Quarantine in Queens, Day 133. © Neil Kramer Quarantine in Queens, Day 158. © Neil Kramer Quarantine in Queens, Day 222. © Neil Kramer Quarantine in Queens, Day 263. © Neil Kramer Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/22/2020
In the 1970s, under the aegis of the Great Society’s Model Cities Program, photographer Earlie Hudnall, Jr. began to document the predominantly African-American neighborhoods of Houston’s 3rd, 4th, and 5th wards, and for more than forty years he has continued to create an indelible portrait of life in these neighborhoods. To be sure, Hudnall has photographed all around the world, and worked for years as the photographer for Texas Southern University, but it is his images of the people of Houston that we discuss today, and that are included in his current exhibition at the Photographs Do Not Bend Gallery in Dallas, running through October 31, 2020. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we talk with Hudnall about the relationship between the stories he tells with his images and those he grew up with in his native Mississippi; how the tradition, culture, and community of his youth reveal themselves in the faces and facades of modern Houston. We also talk about his organic approach to photography and how respect for his subjects informs his process, and how eye contact and body language are tools to connect with people on the street. Hudnall is old school—he works with digital cameras when needed—but his Hasselblad and Nikon film cameras are his primary tools and he discusses why he chooses one over the other to make a particular image. Hudnall also prints his photographs, so we talk about sourcing supplies, Ilford paper, and darkroom techniques. And while we do get into camera talk and a “sweet, sweet, sweet, soft Rolleiflex,” much of our conversation with Hudnall focuses on how memory and inspiration react in a moment to create a powerful image and how staying sensitive to your surroundings will serve your imaging. It is a joy to listen to Hudnall; please join us for this conversation. Guest: Earlie Hudnall, Jr. Photograph © Earlie Hudnall, Jr. Mr. Shine, 3rd Ward, Houston, 1988 © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, TX Girl with Flag, 3rd Ward, Houston, 1991 © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, TX Hip Hop, Galveston, TX, 1993 © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, TX Looking Out, 3rd Ward, Houston, TX, 1991 © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, TX Feeling the Spirit, 3rd Ward, Houston, TX, 1987 © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, TX Boy Eastern Star, 3rd Ward, Houston, TX, 1984, © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, T Roots, 1997 © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, TX Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/29/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we present a conversation with two photographers. We start with Aaron Turner, who is also a scholar, an archivist, and the host of the podcast “Photographers of Color.” Turner stays with us as we speak later with Laylah Amatullah Barrayn about her street portraiture during the COVID-19 outbreak in New York and  the recent uprising in Minneapolis. With Turner, we talk about the genesis of The Center for Photographers of Color, which is currently located at the School of Arts at the University of Arkansas, and how it grew from a Twitter feed as an attempt to recognize and connect the many African-American photographers both currently working and of historical significance and influence. We discuss the Center and its research, exhibition, archiving goals, and overall mission to develop and maintain a community of photographers. We also chat with Turner about his personal photography and how that has evolved over the years from photojournalism to documentary to a more conceptual form integrating personal and cultural histories. After a break, we welcome Laylah Amatullah Barrayn and jump right into a conversation about her decision to return to her Brownsville, Brooklyn, neighborhood to photograph the residents during the early uncertain days of the COVID-19 outbreak. In addition to an assignment on funeral directors, she created a wonderful series on the fashion and cultural statements of wearing a mask. We also speak about her work in Minneapolis during the June uprising there, and how she focused on portraiture of the residents, as opposed to the protests themselves. We also discuss technique with a FUJIFILM mirrorless system and a 35mm lens, the need to bear witness, the value of working with a community of photographers, and the “power of the archive.” Join us for this wide-ranging and passionate conversation about the importance of recognizing tradition, supporting your fellow photographers, and pushing for necessary changes within the photography sphere and the culture at large. Guests: Aaron Turner and Laylah Amatullah Barrayn Photograph © Aaron Turner Looking at Drue King, from The Black Alchemy, Vol 2 series, 2018 © Aaron Turner Untitled, from The Black Alchemy, Vol. 1 series, 2015 © Aaron Turner Great Uncle Sammie's Funeral, Marion, Arkansas, 2014 © Aaron Turner Bethel A.M.E. Church, Lansing, Arkansas, 2015 © Aaron Turner Terrence D., Dumas, Arkansas, 2015 © Aaron Turner Lougè Delcy, also known as Dapper Lou, wears a custom-designed mask near the entrance of Prospect Park, May, 2020 © Laylah Amatullah Barrayn Aïssatou, from Conakry, Guinea, waits for the shuttle train at the Prospect Park station, Brooklyn, May 2020 © Laylah Amatullah Barrayn Minneapolis, June, 2020 © Laylah Amatullah Barrayn Minneapolis, June, 2020 © Laylah Amatullah Barrayn Mutual aid networks, distributing food and supplies in north Minneapolis, June 2020 © Laylah Amatullah Barrayn Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/17/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome Margit Erb and Michael Parillo, of the Saul Leiter Foundation, to discuss Saul Leiter’s career and their work preserving the art and the legacy of this pioneer of color photography. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Leiter veered from the traditional religious path his parents desired for him and moved to New York City to follow his own calling. Met with early success in the 1950s—Leiter’s photography was included in exhibits at MoMA and he built a steady career as a fashion photographer for Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar —by the 1980s, he was forced to give up his studio and struggled financially, but late in life his huge archive of color street photography, much of which was unseen beyond a few curators and colleagues, became a treasure chest of fine art photography. A painter and photographer, he left behind a tremendous amount of work, including hundreds of rolls of unprocessed film, that has been entrusted to Erb and the Leiter Foundation. We talk with Erb and Parillo about Leiter’s early life, his growth as a photographer, his shooting style, his work in fashion, and even how he turned down an invitation to be included in the legendary “Family of Man” exhibition at MoMA. After a break, we discuss the nuts and bolts of organizing and maintaining an archive that is at once massive and unwieldy and a never-ending source of inspiration. Join us for this fascinating conversation about a photographer whose complete body of work is yet to be fully appreciated. Guests: Margit Erb and Michael Parillo Photograph © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery Sunday Morning at the Cloisters, 1947 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Five and Dime, 1950 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery From Harper’s Bazaar, February, 1959 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Mirrors, 1962 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Red Curtain, 1956 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Red Umbrella, 1955 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Haircut, 1956 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Snow, 1970 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Untitled, 1950s © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Self-portrait, 1950s © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/11/2020
It’s easy to admire Sebastian Meyer, not simply because he’s a talented photographer who also co-founded the first photojournalism agency in Iraq, but because he is confident enough to speak of his shortcomings, his naiveté, and of tragedy. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome Meyer to discuss his “love at first sight” for photojournalism, the Metrography photo agency he opened in Iraqi Kurdistan, and how he lost a colleague and friend to the violence of the war against ISIS. We also laugh a bunch during this episode and talk about being an “arrogant white guy,” how research can create preconceived ideas, the tropes of war photography, a bit about gear, and about the conditional nature of journalistic standards and freedom of the press. After a short break, we learn of Meyer’s involvement in a prolonged hostage situation, his return to photojournalism, and how his new book, Under Every Yard of Sky, is not only a beautiful chronicle of modern Iraqi Kurdistan, in war and in peace, but is also a tribute to a friend taken too soon. Join us for this wonderful conversation that touches on so many important issues of the contemporary documentary and photojournalism. Guest: Sebastian Meyer Manchester, United Kingdom 2005. Photograph © Sebastian Meyer Manchester, United Kingdom 2005. Photograph © Sebastian Meyer cover of Under Every Yard of Sky by Sebastian Meyer, 2019 from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer Friends and family of Kamaran grieve after hearing the news of his death, 2014. Photograph © Sebastian Meyer Sebastian and Kamaran, Photograph courtesy Sebastian Meyer Allan Weitz and Sebastian Meyer, 2020. Photograph © John Harris Sebastian Meyer on the B&H Photography Podcast, 2020. Photograph © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/08/2020
During a little holiday trip, producer John Harris made a visit to the gallery and studio of photographer Clyde Butcher. For anyone who grew up in Florida, Butcher’s work should be very familiar; his photography is often found on the walls of local libraries, municipal buildings, and, as Miami native Jason Tables points out, “every doctor’s office I’ve ever been in.” Butcher’s images of the Florida landscapes, particularly of the Everglades, are legendary, and although he has a brisk print-sales business, many of the photos in libraries have the attached placard, “Donated by Clyde Butcher.” Although he is known primarily for his large format black-and-white photography of “the swamp,” Butcher’s photographic career extends back many decades and includes architectural photography, mountain and western landscapes, filmed documentaries, and decorative color photography. Interestingly, Butcher began his career selling prints at small art fairs and, in the 1970s, he had a thriving business selling thousands of prints through department stores such as Sears and Montgomery Ward. This episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is a casual conversation that glides through several topics, including Butcher’s work with large format cameras, his recent foray into Sony digital cameras paired with Canon tilt-shift lenses, the incredible set of vintage enlargers in his giant darkroom space, the business models he and his family employ to market his images, water conservation, and, of course, his relationship to the Florida landscape for which he will be forever linked. Join us for this conversation with a true master. Guest: Clyde Butcher Above photograph © Clyde Butcher Tamiani Trail © Clyde Butcher Cigar Orchid Pond © Clyde Butcher Ochopee © Clyde Butcher Big Cypress © Clyde Butcher Moonrise © Clyde Butcher Plaja-S’Arenella-with-Boat, from Salvador Dali series © Clyde Butcher Cadaques, from Salvador Dali series © Clyde Butcher Cap-de-Creus, from Salvador Dali series © Clyde Butcher Clocks by Clyde Butcher circa, 1970s © Clyde Butcher Clyde Butcher and John Harris © Niki Butcher Niki and Clyde Butcher © John Harris Clyde Butcher in his Venice, Florida office © John Harris Butcher workshop and darkroom, 2019 © John Harris Niki Butcher with enlarger, 2019 © John Harris Clyde Butcher in Movie Dome with 11 x 14" view camera © Clyde Butcher Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/24/2019
For this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we took our portable recorders to an elegant mansion along Central Park, which had been decked out by Sony as a series of stylized photography sets, complete with full lighting, backdrops, and models. They also happened to have on hand many brand-new Sony Alpha a7R IV Mirrorless Digital Cameras and hundreds of lenses for the guests to shoot with in these mini studios. Let’s not forget about the great music, delicious food, and open bar Sony provided. All in all, it was a wonderful event to celebrate the highest megapixel full-frame camera on the market. Sony invited many impressive photographers, writers, influencers, retailers, and… us. And we made our way through the many rooms, speaking with Sony representatives and photographers, getting their first impressions of this latest incarnation of the Alpha a7R series. Needless to say, people were impressed and, after seeing the specs and handling this new camera, so were we. Our first guest is Michael Bubolo, Senior National Manager from Sony PRO Support. We sat with Bubolo before the crowds arrived and were able to go over some of the upgrades and features and get his thoughts on what makes this camera stand out from previous models. Next, we welcome the one and only Ken Rockwell to ask his thoughts on the camera and anything else he wanted to talk about. After a short break, we speak with visual artist Lori Grinker about her potential uses for the a7R IV and, then, with landscape and travel photographer Jude Allen, who happened to be in town from San Francisco, about his first impressions after handling the camera. Finally, we sit down with Sony Artisans Andy Katz and Colby Brown, who both had had the opportunity to shoot the new camera for a couple of weeks and report back on the features they most appreciate for the specific work they do. Join us for this in-depth look at the latest Sony full-frame mirrorless camera, and let us know if you are ready to upgrade. Guests: Michael Bubolo, Ken Rockwell, Lori Grinker, Jude Allen, Andy Katz, and Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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