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Posted 03/11/2021
This is the second episode of the B&H Photography Podcast produced with the collaboration of Leica Camera, and we are pleased to welcome photographer Stella Johnson to the show. It is the “in-between moments of life” that Johnson describes as the subject of her work, work that includes books and documentary series made in Cameroon, Greece, Nicaragua, and Mexico. In this easygoing conversation, we discuss the nature of her long-term projects, and the motivations that return her to the same places year after year. We also talk about composing with rangefinder cameras, being at the eye level of your subject, and the weeks that go by without making pictures and the verbal and nonverbal communication necessary when you are invited as a photographer into a community or home, as Johnson has been. For her personal documentary work, Johnson has relied on Leica M cameras and a 35mm focal length lens. We discuss this focal distance in terms of a personal comfort zone and one that even felt safer during pandemic time. Johnson keeps her settings simple and concentrates on composition and the moment; she tends to find light and locations that she likes and waits for the images. Because Johnson’s compositions are so strong in black-and-white and her color work is minimal and adroit, we ask for her thoughts on how to work with both formats and if a fluidity between them is easy. Finally, in searching for a definition of documentary photography, we mulled over the effect of time, of returning to locations and subjects, of its distinction from photojournalism, as seeing “what life is like” and the stories of “just daily life.” Guest: Stella Johnson Photograph © Stella Johnson From “Al Sol” © Stella Johnson From “Al Sol” © Stella Johnson From “Al Sol” © Stella Johnson From “Al Sol” © Stella Johnson From “ZOI” © Stella Johnson From “ZOI” © Stella Johnson From “ZOI” © Stella Johnson From “ZOI” © Stella Johnson From “ZOI” © Stella Johnson From “RE-CREATIONS” © Stella Johnson Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C. Steiner
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Posted 10/22/2020
In the 1970s, under the aegis of the Great Society’s Model Cities Program, photographer Earlie Hudnall, Jr. began to document the predominantly African-American neighborhoods of Houston’s 3rd, 4th, and 5th wards, and for more than forty years he has continued to create an indelible portrait of life in these neighborhoods. To be sure, Hudnall has photographed all around the world, and worked for years as the photographer for Texas Southern University, but it is his images of the people of Houston that we discuss today, and that are included in his current exhibition at the Photographs Do Not Bend Gallery in Dallas, running through October 31, 2020. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we talk with Hudnall about the relationship between the stories he tells with his images and those he grew up with in his native Mississippi; how the tradition, culture, and community of his youth reveal themselves in the faces and facades of modern Houston. We also talk about his organic approach to photography and how respect for his subjects informs his process, and how eye contact and body language are tools to connect with people on the street. Hudnall is old school—he works with digital cameras when needed—but his Hasselblad and Nikon film cameras are his primary tools and he discusses why he chooses one over the other to make a particular image. Hudnall also prints his photographs, so we talk about sourcing supplies, Ilford paper, and darkroom techniques. And while we do get into camera talk and a “sweet, sweet, sweet, soft Rolleiflex,” much of our conversation with Hudnall focuses on how memory and inspiration react in a moment to create a powerful image and how staying sensitive to your surroundings will serve your imaging. It is a joy to listen to Hudnall; please join us for this conversation. Guest: Earlie Hudnall, Jr. Photograph © Earlie Hudnall, Jr. Mr. Shine, 3rd Ward, Houston, 1988 © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, TX Girl with Flag, 3rd Ward, Houston, 1991 © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, TX Hip Hop, Galveston, TX, 1993 © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, TX Looking Out, 3rd Ward, Houston, TX, 1991 © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, TX Feeling the Spirit, 3rd Ward, Houston, TX, 1987 © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, TX Boy Eastern Star, 3rd Ward, Houston, TX, 1984, © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, T Roots, 1997 © Earlie Hudnall, Jr., courtesy PDNB Gallery, Dallas, TX Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/14/2020
Recognized as a premier headshot and portrait photographer, Peter Hurley has quite the tale to tell. His work is known for the genuine expressions he captures, and he has expanded his business into an international organization. He is also an in-demand speaker and photo educator, but Hurley has an interesting “origin story” when it comes to photography, and we will discuss how he went from being a competitive sailor to a model to a photographer and how sailing remains an integral part of his creative life. This week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is a casual but insightful conversation about life’s twists and turns taking you to a place you never expected and how being open to challenges and to advice can motivate creativity. Sometimes “failing” is the best way to find your success, and Hurley tells us about competing for the U.S. Sailing Team and how accepting opportunities that seemed far from his initial goal led him to photography. We also talk about how he turned his headshot business into the “ Headshot Crew ” and now coaches and disperses work to a network of photographers around the world. Throughout the conversation, we touch on tips to improve your own portrait and headshot game, and Hurley mentions the lighting kit he has created with Westcott. We also discuss the “10,000 Headshot” project, for which he helped to organize his network of photographers to aid folks left unemployed by the COVID-19 pandemic. With the support of Canon and others, members of the Headshot Crew have photographed thousands of people, creating free headshots for anyone out of work. And as we discuss, a quality headshot is increasingly important in the “work from home” era. Join us for this enjoyable conversation. Guest: Peter Hurley Photograph © Peter Hurley Alfredo Plessman III © Peter Hurley Ben Yannette © Peter Hurley Carina Goldbach © Peter Hurley Deborah Robinson © Peter Hurley Fernando Romero © Peter Hurley Jan McCay © Peter Hurley Nancy Randall © Peter Hurley March Palou © Peter Hurley Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/09/2018
Are the 1990s history? Well, for today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we look back to that decade when a new aesthetic in fashion photography was born in England, and later spread to the United States and the world; a transformative style whose influence is apparent almost thirty years after its birth. First appearing in small but influential magazines such as The Face, i-D, and Blitz, and growing from a reactionary youth culture, this raw style reflected a new aesthetic, one that rejected the glam, the supermodel, and the highly stylized photos of the 1980s in favor of eclectic clothing, waifish models, a low-tech, "straight-up" photo style, and a lot of “frickin’ attitude.” For this episode, we welcome fashion photographer Michael Sanders, who is a regular contributor to Italian Elle and who shot for many of the ’90s “style bibles” mentioned above. Sanders came of age in this era and discusses the social and economic factors that lead to this new aesthetic, the cyclical nature of fashion, and the overly simplistic idea of heroin-chic. He also provides a sense of the technologies that made this movement a reality, the gear most commonly used, and the assignment process and shooting-styles embraced. Finally, Sanders offers firsthand insight into the community of photographers, stylists, and models who are associated with this movement, including David Sims, Corinne Day, Kate Moss, Melanie Ward, and the important photographer and bridge figure, Nick Knight. Join us for this interesting look back to the birth of a style and photographic movement that is still reverberating. Guest: Michael Sanders Photograph © Corinne Day, model: Kate Moss, The 3rd Summer of Love cover from “The Face.” 1990 Photograph © Michael Sanders from “Blood Simple”, “The Face.” 1997 Photograph © Michael Sanders from “Blood Simple”, “The Face.” 1997 Photograph © Michael Sanders from “Blood Simple”, “The Face.” 1997 Photograph © Michael Sanders from “Blood Simple”, “The Face.” 1997 Photograph © Michael Sanders from “Blood Simple”, “The Face.” 1997 Photograph © Michael Sanders from “Blood Simple”, “The Face.” 1997 Photograph © Michael Sanders, 2018 from “Italian Elle”, March 2018 Photograph © Michael Sanders, 2018 from “Italian Elle”, March 2018 Photograph © Michael Sanders, 2018 from “Italian Elle”, March 2018 Photograph © Michael Sanders, courtesy “Italian Elle” Allan Weitz and Michael Sanders, Photograph © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/20/2017
This week, we took our mics and questions to Photoville, the free nine-day photography festival held in in the shadow of the beautiful Brooklyn Bridge. With exhibitions held in re-purposed shipping containers and on fences throughout the DUMBO neighborhood of Brooklyn, not only does Photoville offer a variety of incredible photography series, but it integrates seamlessly into its urban home. In its sixth year, Photoville Brooklyn has grown to include evening programming, lectures, panels, and workshops. Photoville, founded and run by United Photo Industries, has expanded to seven cities with plans for three more in 2018. The wealth of visual storytelling at Photoville is impressive—in our afternoon visit we saw exhibitions from every corner of the world, touching on the important issues of our day, and passing through all photographic genres. While there, we spoke with several photographers and curators about their work, as well as Photoville co-founder Laura Roumanos. Join our conversations with Daniella Zalcman of Women Photograph on their exhibition “Insider/Outsider,” with Sergeant John Martinez of the United States Marine Corps, about the series “ Battles Won,” and with the Director of Photography of The Player’s Tribune, Nate Gordon. We also speak with Rachel Dennis and Julie Winokur, of Talking Eyes Media, about their multimedia exhibit “Newest Americans,” organized in coordination with the Center for Migration and the Global City at Rutgers University, Newark, and the VII Photo Agency. Photography festivals and workshops are a gift to photographers and non-photographers alike. Join us as we find inspiration and motivation from the incredible image-makers found at Photovilleand, if you are in New York, check out all the exhibitions and activities yourself, from September 21-24, 2017. Guests: Laura Roumanos, Daniella Zalcman, Nate Gordon, Sgt. John Martinez, and Rachel Dennis Photoville Brooklyn, with Brooklyn Bridge and downtown New York across the East River All available space at Photoville is used to exhibit photography. Interior of container exhibit, “The Blood and the Rain,” by Yael Martinez and Orlando Velazquez Allan Weitz at Photoville; photographs in background by Lynn Johnson Allan Weitz, Laura Roumanos (Co-founder and Executive Producer of Photoville), and Jason Tables Container exhibit, “Battles Won,” from United States Marine Corps Sgt. John Martinez presents his photography in the exhibit, “Battles Won.” Container exhibit, “Battles Won,” from United States Marine Corps School children visit the exhibit, “Facing Change: Documenting Detroit.” From the exhibit, “Insider/Outsider,” photograph by Yagazie Emezi From the exhibit “Insider/Outsider,” photograph by Griselda San Martin From the exhibit, “Insider/Outsider,” photograph by Annie Tritt from her project, “Transcending Self” Nate Gordon (Director of Photography, “The Player’s Tribune”) with Allan Weitz and Jason Tables New York Liberty players, photograph by Annie Flanagan/The Players' Tribune Pop Warner Football, photograph by Walter Iooss Jr./The Players' Tribune Markelle Fultz pumping gas, photograph by Sam Maller/The Players' Tribune Ricardo Lockette, photograph by Taylor Baucom/The Players Tribune “The Family Imprint,” a photo series by Nancy Borowick, is displayed on a fence in the Brooklyn neighborhood of DUMBO, near Photoville. Allan Weitz and Jason Tables at Photoville Brooklyn Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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