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Posted 08/21/2020
We present a fun and insightful conversation on this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, perhaps due to the Midwestern charm of photographer Julie Blackmon and the enjoyable discussion of her wonderful tableaux vivants of family life in middle America. We also welcome back to the show gallery owner Robert Mann, who is currently hosting an exhibit of Blackmon’s photographs titled Talent Show. Mann was a guest on our show, in 2018, when we spoke about the work of Australian photographer Murray Fredericks. The medium format compositions of Julie Blackmon infuse innocent playtime with a creeping sense of danger to create works with a wonderful dark humor. There is also a welcome DIY spirit to her work, and we talk about the creation of her photos and the involvement of her own family and friends in the images; even photos that have up to twenty-five subjects are produced and organized with her sisters and fellow parents.  She is hands-on in all aspects of the work, including making the large prints herself. We also talk about her use of the Hasselblad H system and how she combines wide angle and normal perspectives in her detailed final prints. After a break, Robert Mann takes the lion’s share of the questions as we discuss the many challenges faced by photography galleries. In addition to the expense of a brick and mortar gallery and the proliferation of online viewing and sales, the COVID-19 pandemic has forever changed the idea of a public art gallery.  Mann relates the decision to close his Chelsea gallery and receive collectors on a by-appointment basis, as well as his thoughts on creating editions and limiting prints and the general state of the fine art photo market. Join us for this enlightening four-way conversation as we gain insight from the perspective of the artist and the gallerist. Guests: Julie Blackmon and Robert Mann Photograph © Julie Blackmon River, 2020 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Baby Toss, 2009 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Stock Tank, 2012 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Talent Show, 2019 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Outing, 2019 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Spray Paint, 2020 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/16/2018
As Allan Weitz says in the introduction, when you see a Jeffrey Milstein photo, you know it. He has a distinctive style, which is not an easy accomplishment for an aerial photographer. But, of course, not all his images are taken from high above—he also has an incredible series shot from underneath airplanes. All kidding aside, Milstein’s work—aerial or otherwise—is infused with the complexity of observation and with the fascination of how similar forms repeat themselves in distinctive ways. On this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Jeff Milstein about his photography, with an emphasis on his aerial photography and the process, gear, and technique he uses to capture these stunning images. We discuss his previous career as an architect and the influence that carries into his work, the medium format and 35mm format digital camera he prefers, and his lens choices. Along with Weitz, who also has much aerial photography experience, we discuss using a gyro stabilizer and the advancements made in in-camera stabilization systems. We also chat about communication with pilots and how to plan a helicopter aerial shoot. Milstein also discusses the post-production techniques used to create his geometric compositions and the large format prints he makes, many of which are currently on exhibit at the Benrubi Gallery, in New York. Guest: Jeffrey Milstein Boeing 757-200, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Airbus A340-300, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Boeing 737-700, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Boeing 747-400, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Caribbean Princess, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Carnival Sensation, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Carnival Victory at Night, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein 5th Ave. Midtown, New York, NY, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Park La Brea, Los Angeles, CA, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Stuyvesant Town, New York, NY, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Coney Island, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Disneyland, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Gatwick Airport, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein LAX Airport, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Jeffrey Milstein, Photograph © John Harris Jeffrey Milstein and Allan Weitz, Photograph © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/14/2016
Are dance and photography natural enemies? Well, of course not, but one art form is about the still, captured moment, and the other about choreographed movement and fluidity. However, anyone who truly understands photography knows the importance of timing, grace, and harmony, and a dancer must also recognize the relevance of rest and static. Sculpture, or gesture perhaps, is their common bond and our two guests know well the significance of gesture and the conflicting and compatible characteristics of dance and photography. They join us to talk about their distinct work and shooting styles. Lois Greenfield is one of the recognized masters of the craft, having developed a singular style sought by the world’s most renowned dance companies, and Omar Z Robles, an official Fujifilm X-Photographer, brings a fresh take, blending aspects of documentary and street photography. Enjoy this episode as we discuss improvisation, inspiration, dodging taxis and, of course, lighting systems and camera and lens choices. Guests: Lois Greenfield and Omar Z. Robles   Photographs by ©  Lois Greenfield Photographs by ©  Omar Z. Robles   Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play           Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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