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Posted 12/22/2016
Join us as we talk with two of our most regular and reliable guests about new cameras that were announced in 2016. We hesitate to use the phrase “best” cameras of the year because there a few cameras that we’re not all that crazy about, and a few we can only judge based on their announced specs, but there is plenty to talk about. Shawn Steiner and Levi Tenenbaum test and review cameras for the B&H Explora blog, and bring to this conversation not only extensive product knowledge, but a practical sense of which camera is right for specific photographers and applications. We discuss the new mirrorless medium format cameras announced by Fujifilm and Hasselblad, as well as several new DSLRs and mirrorless cameras, some the first from their respective manufacturers. We also mention a few favorite cameras sent in by listeners (see if you can tell which one we made up), talk industry trends and wrap up the show with a grab bag of favorite accessories. Guests: Levi Tenenbaum and Shawn Steiner Levi Tenenbaum, Shawn Steiner, Allan Weitz   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/02/2016
On this week’s episode, we return to our roots—and not just our photographic roots—but we return to our podcast’s original design of chatting about photography among B&H photographers and writers. We welcome back an original co-host of the podcast, Todd Vorenkamp, as we discuss the basics of photography—the control of light through aperture, shutter speed, and ISO sensitivity. Yes, this episode could be considered a Photo 101 course, and for those who are new to photography (or new to manual control of your imaging) this episode should be very helpful. We walk through the core concepts of how to expose your images to get the look you want and try to clarify the sometimes confusing nomenclature and camera settings. We talk depth of field, diffraction, motion blur, digital noise, “Sunny 16,” and the necessary balance between aperture, shutter speed, and ISO that is required for proper exposure. Photo veterans should tune in, too, because our conversation is by photographers for photographers, and will provide insights and anecdotes that may even improve your skills. Guest: Todd Vorenkamp Shallow depth of field can be created by opening up your lens to its maximum aperture.         John Harris High ISO settings enable sharp imaging in low light but can also produce “noise,” apparent in the sky. John Harris Even a shutter speed of less than 1 second can create blur or, in this case, a short light trail.     John Harris Utilizing a 30 second exposure with tripod, low ISO and a small (f/22) aperture, long light trails and intentional blur are created. An auto white balance setting facilitates the proper rendition of the many different color temperatures in this frame. Jason Tables   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/03/2016
The B&H Photography Podcast was very fortunate to be invited to the 29th Eddie Adams Workshop this year. The annual workshop, officially sponsored by Nikon, with support from B&H, is a unique and inspiring event, bringing together 100 young photographers with some of the world’s most recognized photojournalists and editors, including thirteen Pulitzer Prize winners, for four intense days of photographic presentation and collaboration. Tim Rasmussen, Director of Digital and Print Photography at ESPN, joined us for a chat in our improvised studio in the fabled barn on the Eddie Adams farm. Prior to ESPN, Rasmussen was the Assistant Managing Editor of Photography and Multimedia at the Denver Post and under his lead, their photo department earned three Pulitzer Prizes. Tim is also a member of the Board of Directors at the Eddie Adams Workshop and, in addition to having been a team leader, producer and editor at the workshop, he was a student in its very first year—1988. Our conversation with Rasmussen revolves around the workshop—how he came to attend the first-ever workshop, why it has become a breeding ground and “sanctuary” for two generations of talented photojournalists and, of course, around Eddie Adams himself. We also talk with Rasmussen about his own career, transition from photographer to editor, and how he ended up at ESPN. Within this relaxed conversation there is much to learn—about the threads of life and the nature of commitment, about the practice of photojournalism and, particularly for young photographers, about what an editor looks for when hiring a photographer. Photograph above © Tim Rasmussen Guest: Tim Rasmussen Eddie Adams. Photograph by ©Tim Rasmussen The Board of Directors of the Eddie Adams Workshop, 1992. Photo Courtesy Tim Rasmussen The first Black Team at the workshop recreates Joe Rosenthal’s famous Iwo Jima image with Rosenthal in attendance. Photo Courtesy Tim Rasmussen Gregory Heisler at the first ever Eddie Adams Workshop, 1988. Photo courtesy Tim Rasmussen From the 2016 Eddie Adams Workshop Photographer Carol Guzy preparing for her talk at the barn Photographer Adrees Latif with student at 11:30 Club portfolio review Tim Rasmussen editing student’s work Photographer Marco Grob during his talk in the barn Editor Jim Colton offers advice to a student Photographer Nick Ut running for “president” at the 2016 Eddie Adams Workshop Students check out each other’s work at 11:30 Club   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/18/2016
While digital camera manufacturers are constantly looking for ways to improve and increase resolution, dynamic range, frame rate, ISO, and…everything, a very strong counter trend has emerged that is turning back to analog, mechanical, and film techniques.  Standing out amongst these “throwback” technologies is the rising popularity of instant film and instant film cameras. Fujifilm Instax has seen their sales soar but more interesting is the Impossible Project, who, in just a few years has become the go-to source for a wide variety of instant film and, recently, instant cameras, such as the new  I-1 Instant Film Camera. On todays’ episode we talk with Patrick Tobin from Impossible and photographer George Weiss, who incorporates instant film into his portrait and wedding work. We discuss how Impossible began by purchasing the last remaining Polaroid film factory, how they refurbish cameras for re-sale and how they continue to tweak their instant film chemistry.  Join us for an enlightening discussion on the intricacies of an upstart company that is finding success marketing “old” technology to new customers. Guests: Patrick Tobin and George Weiss         Photographs by George Weiss Impossible I-1 Instant Film Camera Impossible Instant Lab Universal Impossible Polaroid SX-70 Original Instant Film Camera Impossible Polaroid 600 Square Instant Camera   Patrick Tobin, Allan Weitz, and George Weiss Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play         Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/29/2016
Digital video is a huge a part of “photography” now. There are almost no digital cameras introduced without some kind of video capability and, in some cases, “still” cameras are the go-to choice for professional videographers. Recently, we have seen 4K video top 1080 as the standard, and many camera lines, from DSLR to smartphone, are now providing 4K capability, but is this level of quality really warranted or even effective in a point-and-shoot camera? Today’s episode of the podcast will take on this question and, in so doing, we will discuss the particulars of 4K, including what camera models offer this high-definition quality, how do sensor size and form factor affect image quality, what peripherals are needed to make videos of a quality that merit 4K, and what’s the point of recording 4K if you can’t screen 4K? Join us as two B&H experts help clear the air regarding 4K video in still cameras.   Shawn Steiner, Allan Weitz, and Josh Pomponio Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play       b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/30/2016
The oft-quoted line paraphrased for our headline, and notably used in reference to Oskar Schindler and Chiune Sugihara, can also be applied to industrialist and Leica camera manufacturer Ernst Leitz II, who used his influence to help many Jews and other subjugated people avoid persecution, maintain their jobs, or even escape Germany during the 1930s and 1940s. Like any story drawn from a terrible era of oppression, heroes are painted with shades of gray, and humanitarianism can be found in small gestures, but historian Frank Dabba Smith creates a narrative derived from primary source research. Our other guest, photographer Jill Enfield, recounts her family’s direct relationship with this chapter of Jewish, German, American, and photographic history. Join us for this engaging conversation. Guests: Frank Dabba Smith and Jill Enfield To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. Frank Dabba Smith From the book, Ernst Leitz II- Ich entscheide hiermit: Es wird riskiert Jill Enfield, Frank Dabba Smith, and Allan Weitz Photos by Jill Enfield b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 11/11/2015
Five years ago, you could buy a quality 35mm film camera for the song playing in your head. Used medium format film cameras collected dust on store shelves. Today, if a Mamiya, Hasselblad, or Rolleiflex become available, they don’t last long before being snatched up by a zealous photographer. And those who regularly shoot digital SLRs know that buying older models does not diminish the quality of your work, and it can save you hundreds of dollars, especially if you use them as roughly as some professionals do. Whether film or digital, the used camera market is alive and well and we will talk with photographer and camera collector Jason Wallace, and member of the B&H Used Department, Chris Koentje on what is new in used gear. From the cameras that are hot in Argentina, to what to inspect when buying a used lens, and to just how important trust is between buyer and seller, we will touch on all aspects of the used camera market in this spirited conversation between industry veterans. Guests: Jason Wallace and Chris Koentje To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. Jason Wallace Chris Koentje   Items from B&H Used Department Camera Museum b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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