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Posted 05/06/2021
This is one of the most enjoyable chats on photography we’ve had in a while, and our subject is the history of amateur and popular photography as understood through photography how-to books and manuals. Joining us on the B&H Photography Podcast is Dr. Kim Beil, professor at Stanford University and author of Good Pictures: The History of Popular Photography, and with Professor Beil we not only speak about what is and has been considered a “good photo,” we specifically talk about her collection of photography how-to books and camera manuals, which act as a guide to this “good photography” over the years. A sense of the collection can be found on her Instagram page, and we discuss examples from various decades, as well as those aimed at certain disciplines and those written by popular instructors and well-known photographers, such as Ansel Adams and Gordon Parks. We also talk with Beil about certain trends in popular photography, including ideas as simple as cropping and the many techniques born of technical and artistic innovation. The role that Kodak played in the early years of amateur photography is touched upon, as is that of Polaroid instant photos of the 1970s. Beil has her favorite type of instructional book and we discuss authors who insisted on a prescriptive style of photography rules and those that were more “amateur to amateur.” We find out how she acquires books and also how YouTube tutorials are affecting the genre. Finally, we talk about digital photography trends and what she considers a good photo. Join us for this wide-ranging conversation sure to please any lover of amateur photography. Guest: Kim Beil Photograph © Kim Beil © Kim Beil © Kim Beil © Kim Beil © Kim Beil © Kim Beil © Kim Beil Cover of “Good Pictures: The History of Popular Photography” © Kim Beil From “Good Pictures: The History of Popular Photography” © Kim Beil From “Good Pictures: The History of Popular Photography” © Kim Beil Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 11/05/2020
Our guest on this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is Sam Hurd. While he is primarily a wedding photographer, I have no doubt that he could photograph anything and make it look interesting. Hurd is also a portrait photographer, he dabbles in landscape work, and is a passionate photo educator. A few minutes listening to this episode and it becomes clear that he can articulate his process as well as he can execute it. He offers “deconstructions” of his images for his Patreon followers and teaches his style, technique, and gear, but today we focus on his “side hustles,” on the methods and platforms he uses to engage with clients and make extra money from the wedding photography he is already doing. We start by discussing his Patreon platform and how he uses his wedding photography images and insights to build a following of “patrons,” who pay monthly subscriptions to follow his tutorials. We then jump to Stocksy, and how his well-curated set of stock images, mostly taken at weddings, creates an additional revenue flow. He also speaks of DVLOP, which is a site that markets presets that he has created while processing his wedding work. Of course, each of these ancillary platforms flows into and out of each other not only to gain him clients but to improve his photography. He mentions several times how the challenge of producing interesting tutorials has forced him to be more inventive. Despite a very simple kit when shooting weddings, Hurd is also a self-described gearhead, and he and Allan bond over their love for vintage glass and discuss recent purchases, including the Hasselblad 907X 50C  and the Canon R6. Finally, we touch on Hurd’s first professional gig, as the staff photographer for the National Press Club, some of the famous faces he photographed, and the odd but practical practice techniques he developed to practice his portraiture. Join us for this very informative episode. Guest: Sam Hurd Photograph © Sam Hurd © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography George Clooney at the National Press Club © Sam Hurd Photography Mariska Hargitay at the National Press Club © Sam Hurd Photography Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/17/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome Margit Erb and Michael Parillo, of the Saul Leiter Foundation, to discuss Saul Leiter’s career and their work preserving the art and the legacy of this pioneer of color photography. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Leiter veered from the traditional religious path his parents desired for him and moved to New York City to follow his own calling. Met with early success in the 1950s—Leiter’s photography was included in exhibits at MoMA and he built a steady career as a fashion photographer for Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar —by the 1980s, he was forced to give up his studio and struggled financially, but late in life his huge archive of color street photography, much of which was unseen beyond a few curators and colleagues, became a treasure chest of fine art photography. A painter and photographer, he left behind a tremendous amount of work, including hundreds of rolls of unprocessed film, that has been entrusted to Erb and the Leiter Foundation. We talk with Erb and Parillo about Leiter’s early life, his growth as a photographer, his shooting style, his work in fashion, and even how he turned down an invitation to be included in the legendary “Family of Man” exhibition at MoMA. After a break, we discuss the nuts and bolts of organizing and maintaining an archive that is at once massive and unwieldy and a never-ending source of inspiration. Join us for this fascinating conversation about a photographer whose complete body of work is yet to be fully appreciated. Guests: Margit Erb and Michael Parillo Photograph © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery Sunday Morning at the Cloisters, 1947 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Five and Dime, 1950 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery From Harper’s Bazaar, February, 1959 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Mirrors, 1962 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Red Curtain, 1956 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Red Umbrella, 1955 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Haircut, 1956 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Snow, 1970 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Untitled, 1950s © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Self-portrait, 1950s © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/12/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome intellectual property attorney David Deal back to the program to discuss issues regarding copyright infringement, particularly as they involve three high-profile cases in which he is involved. Deal spoke with us last year about a case he had just litigated, Brammer vs Violent Hues Productions, in which he successfully argued to reverse a lower court’s decision, thus protecting his client’s photograph from copyright infringement. While it was a relatively small case, the decision carried positive ramifications for photographers and should stand as precedent going forward. Deal provides a summary of why that case is so important to photographers. He also brings us up to speed on a high-profile case in which he represents many possible heirs to the copyright of Vivian Maier’s photo catalogue. On the second half of our show, we will speak with Deal about the current case in which he is involved, regarding the estate of noted rural portrait photographer Mike Disfarmer  1884–1959). This conversation will serve as an introduction to a serial segment we will record with David Deal over the coming months about the Disfarmer images. Disfarmer’s work is well known and sought after in the art world, but the question remains as to who are the rightful heirs of his work and whether they have been properly compensated. Because his images have been reproduced and sold for many years by various vendors, the case is complicated, and Deal walks us through the issues surrounding this fascinating photographer and case, which involves heroes and villains from small-town Arkansas to big-city New York. Keep your eyes (and ears) open for the future segments of this series as Deal and his team work through the many layers of research and legal briefs, hopefully to sort out the legal entanglements and set the record straight. Guest: David Deal Photograph © Mike Disfarmer All photos in this carousel © Mike Disfarmer Previous Pause Next Mike Disfarmer Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/22/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome editorial, fashion, art, and music photographer Olivia Bee. That’s a lot of tags and she’s earned them all in a relatively short time span. Her “origin story” is well-documented in photo circles, so we won’t go into that much, but in a career now a decade old, we discuss where those early successes have brought her, what she enjoys about photography, and what she is working on now. With clients that include Hermes, Nike, L’Oreal, Sony, and editorial assignments from Vice, Elle, the New York Times, and Complex Magazine, Bee has created a comprehensive body of commercial work while continuing to evolve the personal aesthetic that got her noticed in the first place. She is also now directing music and other videos and beginning a narrative film effort. We speak with Bee from her bucolic Oregon acreage and discuss a wide range of topics, from the evolution of her gear, including her current use of view cameras, to her self-portraiture techniques, to publishing her first book, Kids in Love, with Aperture. We also spend some time discussing her work with musicians, the different approaches to an editorial assignment with a musician, and working on album art or a portrait. Finally, Bee lets us in on her dream assignment and Allan promises to make that dream come true. Join us for this pleasant and informative conversation. Guest: Olivia Bee Lovers, 2013; from “Kids in Love” © Olivia Bee Baller, 2011; from “Kids in Love” © Olivia Bee Purple Haze, 2011; from “Enveloped in a Dream” © Olivia Bee from “Viva Las Vegas,” 2015 © Olivia Bee from “Viva Las Vegas,” 2015 © Olivia Bee Migos for Billboard, 2017 © Olivia Bee Kesha for Billboard, 2017 © Olivia Bee Larsen Thompson, 2016 © Olivia Bee Birdy for REDValentino SS16 Campaign © Olivia Bee Schiaparelli Couture © Olivia Bee Max and Opal (Barely Seventeen), 2016 © Olivia Bee Portrait of the American West, 2017 © Olivia Bee Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/26/2019
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome California-based advertising, sports, dance, and fashion photographer (and director), Alexis Cuarezma, who packs a considerable amount of practical and creative insight into our hour-long conversation. Ostensibly, Cuarezma was joining us to talk about his lighting techniques and, while he does dive deep into lighting schemes, we discuss so much more. Cuarezma is generous with is thoughts on production, composition, models, gear, self-promotion, and marketing really anything that he understands to help him in his burgeoning photo business. Just a glance at his work, and one will realize why Cuarezma is here to discuss lighting techniques, he has shot for Sports Illustrated (including six covers), Fortune magazine, Ring magazine, the New York Times, and his clients include Nike. Cuarezma emphasizes his belief that getting it right “in-camera” is the key to his success, not just for the sake of the final image, but for his creative process. Researching, planning, arriving early, being hands-on in every phase of the work, and understanding that your vision, when properly executed, will win over a client, is the other key to his success. With Cuarezma we discuss his decision-making process when creating a portrait; each of the small problems that needs to be solved to create the desired look that works best for his particular subject. While comfortable renting the needed gear to fulfill each project, he also discusses the gear he owns and uses, including Profoto B1 lights, Rosco Gels, and his Canon 5DS. Join us for this insightful and very educational episode. Guest: Alexis Cuarezma Photograph © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma Christine Shevchenko, American Ballet Theater © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma © Alexis Cuarezma Hunter Strickland © Alexis Cuarezma Chris Paul © Alexis Cuarezma John Harris, Allan Weitz, Alexis Cuarezma, and Jason Tables © Jason Tawiah Previous Pause Next
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Posted 07/17/2019
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome photographer Ashok Sinha, who talks about his forthcoming book, Driver-full City: The Unique Architecture of Car Culture in Greater Los Angeles, and discusses the Cartwheel Initiative, a nonprofit that he founded, which works with displaced and refugee youth, using photography and multimedia tools to inspire these youth to find their voice through art and creative thinking. Above photograph © Ashok Sinha Before we get into our conversation with Sinha, however, we want to let you know about an opportunity we are offering our listeners. We will be giving away forty free tickets to a private screening of the film, Jay Myself, directed by photographer Stephen Wilkes, about the photographer Jay Maisel. Wilkes will be in attendance for a Q/A session after the screening. Many of you may remember when Maisel and Wilkes joined us to talk about the making of this movie, and we are excited to extend this offer to the first forty listeners who request a ticket. This screening will be in New York City, on August 4, so if you cannot be in New York on that date, please do not request a ticket, which are limited to two per person. If you would like to attend the screening and meet the filmmakers, send a request to podcast@bhphoto.com or join our B&H Photography Podcast Facebook Group and comment on the post regarding the free screening. Screening details are in the post and we look forward to meeting you. Ashok Sinha is a complete photographer and filmmaker, able to make a living from his architecture and interior design photography, but also adept at large-scale landscapes, human-interest editorial stories, and portraiture. His photographs have been widely published by editorial outlets such as The New York Times, TIME, Interior Design, and exhibited by The Museum of the City of New York, the International Center of Photography, and The Royal Photographic Society. And, as mentioned, Sinha has found a wonderful way to use photography to give back to the youth most in need of a helping hand. Join us for this inspiring episode and request your free tickets to Jay Myself. Guest: Ashok Sinha “Driver-full City” © Ashok Sinha “Driver-full City” © Ashok Sinha “Driver-full City” © Ashok Sinha “Driver-full City” © Ashok Sinha “Driver-full City” © Ashok Sinha Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/03/2019
This is a conversation we wanted to last another hour. Talking with intellectual property attorney (and accomplished photographer) David Deal about copyright protection and “fair use” in the Instagram era was such an easy education and pleasant conversation. We already ran long on this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, just scratching the surface of these topics, and we had to edit out a side conversation we had with Deal about his fascinating work regarding the estate of photographer Vivian Maier. We plan to release that insightful interview in the very near future, but our show today focuses specifically on Deal’s work in the Brammer v. Violent Hues Productions Case and, in general, on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, rampant copyright infringement, and the value of photography in our sharing and social media-centric culture. Above photograph © Russell Brammer We begin our conversation with an overview on the Brammer case, involving an image by photographer Russell Brammer, which had been found on Flickr, and used without his authorization and without financial compensation. After attempts to resolve the matter without litigation, Deal advanced their suit against the offending party who themselves lawyered up, setting the stage for a Federal District Court judgment and subsequent reversal by a Federal Appeals Court. Deal walks us through the twists and turns of the “fair use” arguments and hints at how this small infringement case may turn out to be a very big victory for photographers. After a break, we take up broad questions of intellectual property protection, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, the roles and responsibilities of social media platforms, and how we might right the ship, in terms of photographs being valued for the effort involved in their creation and photographers being rightly compensated. Deal also offers a few pieces of welcomed advice for photographers interested in protecting the value of their work. Join us for this very informative episode. Guest: David Deal Alan Greenspan © David Deal John Lewis © David Deal © David Deal © David Deal © David Deal © David Deal from the series “Prospects” © David Deal from the series “Prospects” © David Deal from the series “Prospects” © David Deal © David Deal © Russell Brammer Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/26/2019
Today’s conversations address the challenges photographers encounter when “real life”—children, family, economic changes, even personal tragedy—interrupt the work we would like to be doing, namely taking pictures, and how we find our way back to the form of creative expression we all desire. Above Photograph © @afueravida We welcome four photographers who have overcome challenges or who have found ways to incorporate their own life and lifestyle into their professional work. First, we speak with photographer Erin Babnik, who previously joined us to talk about the tech she uses in her landscape photography, but now tells of her recent brush with tragedy when her new home and studio was engulfed by the deadly 2018 Camp Wildfire, in Paradise, California. Next, we are joined by Sofia Aldinio and Colin Boyd, of AfueraVida.com, who have decided to take their business on the road, quite literally. Not wanting the typical white picket fence and two-car garage lifestyle, they are retrofitting an old fire department van and taking their two young children on an epic journey from Maine to Argentina, all along, photographing for clients who love their real-life family adventure content. After a break, we welcome National Geographic Explorer and Grantee Erika Skogg to discuss her project on Scandinavian-American culture. After years spent traveling the world with her camera, Skogg decided it was time to return to her Wisconsin hometown to live. It wasn’t long before she turned her documentarian’s eye to her own culture and heritage and created a beautiful series on the traditions she knows so well. Finally, we’ll be joined by Carissa Pelleteri, who has published two books on the people of Montauk, NY. “Car” is a Brooklyn native who, after years of vacationing in Montauk, began to notice the changes happening to her beloved getaway. Her books are visual records of the town’s transition from bucolic fishing village to an oft-crowded tourist destination at the eastern end of Long Island. Join us for this intriguing set of conversations, recorded at the 2019 OPTIC Photography Conference. Guests: Erin Babnik, Sofia Aldinio, Colin Boyd, Erika Skogg, and Car Pelleteri Arrow Dynamic © Erin Babnik Silver Lining © Erin Babnik Gold Rush © Erin Babnik High Sodium © Erin Babnik © Erika Skogg, project funded by the National Geographic Society © Erika Skogg, project funded by the National Geographic Society © Erika Skogg, project funded by the National Geographic Society © Erika Skogg, project funded by the National Geographic Society from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri from “Montauk 11954” © Carissa Pelleteri © @afueravida © @afueravida © @afueravida © @afueravida Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/05/2019
Do you have undeveloped rolls of film that have been sitting around forever? Maybe you don't even realize that you have unprocessed rolls from the "good ol' days of analog" in an old camera bag or a dresser drawer. Now is the time to look into this matter and have the chance to explore and share your memories, perhaps even rediscover events and people that memory has left behind. On this week's episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome the directors of Lost Rolls America, Ron Haviv and Lauren Walsh. Inspired by Haviv's own The Lost Rolls book, they have initiated this project to create a national archive of lost, yet now found, images "to form a collective memory that prioritizes the role of photos in constructing our personal and shared pasts. In revisiting the past, this project also encourages contemplation of how the present and future will be remembered." The idea is simple, but one look at the growing archive and the memories shared, and it becomes clear how powerful this project can be. With Haviv and Walsh, we recount the genesis of the project, how PhotoShelter, PhotoWings, and FUJIFILM came onboard as partners, and they offer insight on the future plans for the project. They also discuss a few of the more interesting images and recollections submitted, how the submission process works and, of course, they encourage our listeners to submit lost rolls. Above Photograph © Mette Lampcov/Lost Rolls America Lost Rolls America: What kind of memories does this photo bring back? Valentina Zavarin: I was leaving alone to America. Time for adventure away from my mother and siblings. I remember how excited I was for this new life ahead after World War II. Everyone is smiling but I remember they were in a shock that they were left behind. Valentina Zavarin/Lost Rolls America, 1950 Lost Rolls America: Does this photo bring back any memories? Debra Miller: Yes. Sadness, horror, shock. Debra Miller/ Lost Rolls America, 2001 Lost Rolls America: Is this what you expected to see? Elizabeth Kamir: No. The old roll of Tri-X that had taken up residence in my drawer for nearly 30 years always dared me to imagine. I never planned to develop it. I assumed if there was anything on the roll, it would either be something innocuous, like pictures of my grandmother or something embarrassing, like theatrical, nude self-portraits. I might have taken pictures like that back then. Elizabeth Kamir/Lost Rolls America, 1990 Lost Rolls America: What kind of memories does this photo bring back? Mette Lampcov: It makes me think of how much I used to laugh my head off with her (Tracy). It makes me miss London and old friends, especially people who have a wicked sense of humor- and seeing her head float in the back garden is a perfect reminder of her beautiful funny madness. Mette Lampcov/Lost Rolls America, 2002 Lost Rolls America: How does this old photo make you feel? Michael Starensic: I feel a sense of accomplishment that I was able to capture the times and emotions as the country swayed from crisis to crisis. This was the last interlude- "coming up for air" I called it- between the major tumult of the Kosovo War two months earlier and the start of renewed opposition that month. We soon headed back to the capital and events were intense for the next 14 months. Nevena and I married 2 months later in Belgrade in the midst of mounting protest and turmoil. Michael Starensic/Lost Rolls America, 1999 Lost Rolls America: How does this old photo make you feel? Bruce Lampcov: Very nostalgic. I miss the days when my children were young and together we discovered new places, new cultures. Bruce Lampcov/Lost Rolls America, 2004 Lost Rolls America: What kind of memories does this photo bring back? Tamika Jancewicz: Just how huge I was when I was pregnant! I think I felt that way when I took the picture as well. Tamika Jancewicz/Lost Rolls America, 2007 Lost Rolls America: What are we looking at here? Russell Gontar: This is my friend, Linda. We spent an afternoon taking pictures at the beach and old amusement park. I asked her to close her eyes in an attempt to be "arty". Russell Gontar/Lost Rolls America, 1977 Lost Rolls America: How does this old photo make you feel? Jennifer Mitchell: As all the kiddos in the picture are my nieces and nephew, it makes me feel amazingly proud. One is in the Air Force Academy, one is a wedding planner in a Colorado Rocky Mountain resort, and one just got accepted into a PhD program for Astrophysics. I bet my sister (who is reading to them) thinks that she might have had a little something to do with it.:) When I showed her the picture, she sighed and said, "Oh, that was always one of my favorite things to do with those kids!" Jennifer Mitchell/Lost Rolls America, 2004 Lost Rolls America: How does this old photo make you feel? Keith Munger: Like One Of The Miraculous Few That Loves His Wife As Much Now As In 1969. I Am A Very Lucky Guy! Keith Munger/Lost Rolls America, 1969 Guests: Lauren K. Walsh and Ron Haviv Ron Haviv is a is an Emmy nominated, award-winning photojournalist and co-founder of the photo agency VII, dedicated to documenting conflict and raising awareness about human rights issues around the globe. He has worked in more than one hundred countries and published four critically acclaimed collections of photography. His work has been featured in numerous museums and galleries, including the Louvre, the United Nations, and the Council on Foreign Relations. Lauren Walsh is a professor and writer who teaches at The New School and NYU, where she is the Director of NYU Gallatin's Photojournalism Lab. She is editor of Macondo, a photo book documenting the long-term conflict in Colombia, and coeditor of the collection, The Future of Text and Image, as well as the Millennium Villages Project, a photography book about efforts to relieve extreme poverty in sub-Saharan Africa. She has appeared on CNN as a scholar of photography and digital culture, as well as in the documentary 9/11: Ten Years Later. Ron Haviv, Allan Weitz, and Lauren Walsh John Harris   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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