Don’t Miss an Episode Subscribe Now

Refine
Done
0 Plays
Posted 08/26/2021
Even if you are not currently on your beach vacation, let’s take a little trip to Hawaii’s shores for today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. Joining us is photographer Zak Noyle, who was born and raised in Hawaii and began publishing his surf photography while still in high school. Noyle has photographed the sport’s top surfers and events, has been published in Sports Illustrated and National Geographic, and has traveled the world for brands such as Billabong, Stussy, and Chanel. He also contracts commercial and editorial work (note our chat about photographing Michael Phelps) and has recently opened the Eleven17 Creative Agency. With Noyle we discuss how he started photographing simply to share his love for the ocean and surfing, but we learn that his father is a successful commercial photographer and we chat about the influence and support of family and friends. We also learn that Noyle was a state champion swimmer and how staying in top physical and mental shape is key to working in waves up to sixty feet high. We also discuss the techniques and gear he uses to work below and at the water’s surface, including the signature camera housing that he developed with Aquatech. In this pleasant and wide-ranging conversation, we get to understand how keeping a healthy balance between work and play can spark creativity and how preparation and experience lead to opportunity. Join us in “paradise.” Guest: Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
0 Plays
Posted 08/05/2021
The photos of David Rothenberg are some of the most exciting that we have seen in a while―condensed and entangled compositions of airplanes over urban housing and portraits of travelers, through plane windows, or bathed in a holy light at a train station. His work is provocative, playful, and compassionate and asks us to look at compositions and subjects carefully, addressing issues of isolation and hope. On this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we ask how a fine-art photographer works his way through the neighborhoods and transportation hubs of Queens, NY, making such insightful images. Rothenberg’s books, Landing Lights Park and Roosevelt Station, are wonderful series and, with him, we discuss the evolution of these projects, the gear and locations he chooses, how he interacts with subjects, and the editing and sequencing of the books. Guest: David Rothenberg Photograph (detail) © David Rothenberg From “Roosevelt Station” © David Rothenberg From “Roosevelt Station” © David Rothenberg From “Roosevelt Station” © David Rothenberg From “Roosevelt Station” © David Rothenberg From “Roosevelt Station” © David Rothenberg From “Landing Lights Park” © David Rothenberg From “Landing Lights Park” © David Rothenberg From “Landing Lights Park” © David Rothenberg From “Landing Lights Park” © David Rothenberg From “Landing Lights Park” © David Rothenberg Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
0 Plays
Posted 07/01/2021
Beginning with an iPhone and an “a-ha moment” in the beautiful San Francisco City Hall, photographer Arthur Drooker began a project that would last five years and take him across the United States to photograph the most impressive and interesting city halls in the nation. The project culminated with his wonderful book, City Hall: Masterpieces of American Civic Architecture, from Schiffer Publishing, and it brings him to the B&H Photography Podcast to discuss photographing architecture, civic pride, research and interviews, book publishing, zoom and tilt-shift lenses, and a host of other subjects related to his photography. Join us for this practical and insightful episode. “To me, the best city halls are not just office buildings to administer services, they also use architecture and design to express something about civic pride, civic virtue, and democratic engagement.” —Arthur Drooker Guest: Arthur Drooker Photograph © Arthur Drooker San Francisco City Hall rotunda © Arthur Drooker Buffalo City Hall council chamber © Arthur Drooker Cincinnati City Hall © Arthur Drooker Philadelphia City Hall © Arthur Drooker Detail of William Penn statue atop Philadelphia City Hall © Arthur Drooker San Jose City Hall interior reflections © Arthur Drooker “City Hall” book cover © Arthur Drooker “American Ruins” book cover © Arthur Drooker “Conventional Wisdom” book cover © Arthur Drooker “Pie Town Revisited” book cover © Arthur Drooker Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
0 Plays
Posted 06/30/2021
In support of the 2021 OPTIC Outdoor, Photo/Video, Travel Imaging Conference, to be held online July 11-12, 2021, the B&H Photography Podcast team conducted our own photo walk, much like they do as part of the OPTIC Conference events. For this episode we took our cameras and microphones to the beautiful Elizabeth Park Rose Garden, in West Hartford, Connecticut, and, with Allan as the group’s leader and Jason and I as participants, we completed several photo challenges and practiced our photography and storytelling techniques. Since this is a virtual and audio photo walk, we encourage our listeners to participate on your own time and in convenient locations, such as a local park or even your backyard. The episode is designed so that you can pause the recording after the challenge has been assigned and complete it on your own. You can also just listen as we work through our assigned shots with Allan fielding our questions. The gear we use is our own, nothing fancy, and the various challenges can be completed with almost any camera-and-lens combination. For my part, I am using a full-frame Nikon DSLR with a 24-70mm f/2.8 lens and a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens and Jason is using a full-frame Sony Alpha mirrorless camera with a Sony wide-angle lens and the Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 lens. Assigned shots incorporate wide-angle and telephoto perspectives and utilize basic photo techniques, controlling aperture and shutter speed for varied affects, and applying ideas on composition, shadow, detail, and narrative. There is even a macro photography bonus challenge at the end of the episode, so bring that lens, too, if you have it. We look forward to “hanging out” with you in this virtual setting, as we do to soon returning to “IRL” photo walks with old and new friends. With that in mind, check out the OPTIC Conference events page with two days of online presentations, and register for the free conference hosted by B&H Photo and sponsored by Canon, Nikon, Sony, Sigma, Godox, and many others. Photograph © Jason Tables Photograph © Jason Tables Photograph © Jason Tables Photograph © Jason Tables Photograph © Jason Tables Photograph © Jason Tables Photograph © John Harris Photograph © John Harris Photograph © John Harris Photograph © John Harris Photograph © John Harris Photograph © Allan Weitz Photograph © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
0 Plays
Posted 09/23/2020
For the headline of this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we lifted a line from our guest’s own Instagram bio. It would have been too easy to call a show with Walter Iooss Jr. “Sports Photography Legend” or some such, but that pigeonholes Iooss too easily, and does not recognize the scope of his engagement with photography and with the creative process. Yes, Walter Iooss Jr. is sports photography. He has more than 300 Sports Illustrated covers to his name, his first professional gig was at age 17, and for six decades he has photographed several Hall of Fames’s worth of athletes, including names like Arnold, Mary Lou, Muhammad, and Tiger, and his work with Michael Jordan is unparalleled. Also—every Super Bowl. But he has also photographed rock stars, models, fashion and commercial assignments, portraits, and documentary series. And he tells us of his love for music and that if not for a twist of fate, he might have been a musician. The man is a creator for life, a photographer for life. With Iooss, our conversation takes a leisurely approach, touching on a few of his more memorable photos and some of the interesting lesser knowns; the breadth of his work alone could keep us talking for hours. Along the way, we learn a little about his upbringing, the love for music, his mentors, and the time he shot for Atlantic Records. We discuss how he builds a composition, whether it be an action shot during a game or a complicated portrait setup. We also talk about using a giant Polaroid camera, the coming of autofocus, and Canon DSLRs. Join us for this pleasant conversation that is sure to interest not only fans of sports, but fans of photography. Guest: Walter Iooss Jr. Photograph © Walter Iooss Jr. Andy Samberg, 2011 © Walter Iooss Jr. Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier, 2003 © Walter Iooss Jr. Emmet Ashford, 1968 © Walter Iooss Jr. Tony Scott and Gary Templeton, 1979 © Walter Iooss Jr. Greg Louganis, 1984 © Walter Iooss Jr. Dave Parker and Grant Jackson, 1980 © Walter Iooss Jr. Jack Nicklaus, 1967 © Walter Iooss Jr. The Blue Dunk, Michael Jordan, 1987 © Walter Iooss Jr. The Corner, Havana, Cuba, 1999 © Walter Iooss Jr. Leipzig, East Germany, 1976 © Walter Iooss Jr. Lee Trevino, 1991 © Walter Iooss Jr. Willis Reed, 1973 © Walter Iooss Jr. Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 09/02/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome editor, educator, and photographer Joan Liftin, and Michelle Dunn Marsh, founder and publisher of Minor Matters Books. In the first half of the show, we speak with Liftin about her latest book, Water for Tears, and then we focus on Minor Matters and the unique business model this publishing house utilizes. We also discuss the person who brought them together, the late photographer Charles Harbutt. Liftin was married to Harbutt and was his collaborator, and Marsh has recently published a book of Harbutt’s work and words, titled The Unconcerned Photographer. With Liftin we discuss the genesis of Water for Tears, which is a sort of photo memoir—images from travel and family and fleeting impressions that tie together a lifetime. We discuss editing, sequencing, collaboration, and the subtle difference between narrative and story. We also talk about editing Harbutt’s work and, along with Marsh, about the creation of The Unconcerned Photographer. After a break, Marsh elaborates on the publishing model they employ at Minor Matters—a hybrid of crowdfunding, support membership, and a direct, organic connection between artist, publisher, and consumer. Have a look at their catalog, which presents work from established photographers and new voices in the medium. Join us for this compelling discussion. Guests: Joan Liftin and Michelle Dunn Marsh Photograph © Joan Liftin From "Water for Tears" © Joan Liftin From "Water for Tears" © Joan Liftin From "Water for Tears" © Joan Liftin From "Water for Tears" © Joan Liftin From "Water for Tears" © Joan Liftin From "Water for Tears" © Joan Liftin From "Water for Tears" © Joan Liftin From "Water for Tears" © Joan Liftin Cover of "The Unconcerned Photographer," published by Minor Matters Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 11/06/2019
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome photojournalist and sports photographer Nick Didlick to our show. Didlick has been a freelance shooter, a staff photographer, an agency photographer for Reuters and UPI and, while covering the world news, was nominated for two Pulitzer Prizes. He also is an accomplished videographer, editor, and producer, and has served as Photo Chief for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics and as Director of Photography at the Vancouver Sun, where he oversaw the staff change from film to digital photography. As a photographer, Didlick has always been ahead of the technological curve, willing to try new cameras and transmission systems and push existing technology to its limits. He joins us to discuss his technical evolution as a sports photographer and the features that he considers important to balance technological advances with age-old experience of craft. We ask Didlick to look back on his career and discuss important steps in the evolution of his kit, including autofocus features, compact lenses, telephoto extenders, remote control, wireless transmission and, of course, the development of digital photography. We also look ahead to improvements in metadata and artificial intelligence and his overarching philosophy that all advances should be embraced if they are needed to improve your workflow. Throughout the episode, Didlick pokes fun at my “old” DSLR technology in favor of his Sony Alpha a9 II Mirrorless camera but, in doing so, he underscores his point, that as photographers, the hardest part of advancing your skill set is “un-learning” what you considered fundamental and embrace the changes that can improve your photography. Join us for this rollicking and enjoyable episode. Guest: Nick Didlick Above Photograph © Nick Didlick Wayne Gretzky © Nick Didlick Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev © Nick Didlick Remnants of Pan Am Flight 103, Lockerbie, Scotland © Nick Didlick Tiger Woods © Nick Didlick 2019 NCAA Final Four © Nick Didlick Lindsey Vonn © Nick Didlick Rodeo © Nick Didlick Usain Bolt stumbles and falls during race © Nick Didlick IAAF World Athletics Championship, 2019 © Nick Didlick Venus Williams © Nick Didlick Sloane Stephens with U.S. Open trophy, 2018 ©Nick Didlick Aibo dogs from Sony © Nick Didlick Nick Didlick and Allan Weitz © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 01/26/2018
We welcome back Chris Williams, of Lens Therapy Live, and photographer David Speiser, of lilibirds.com, to the B&H Photography Podcast for a discussion on the applications, techniques, and specific features of super-telephoto lenses. Super-telephoto lenses are most often used by sports and wildlife photographers—however, photojournalists, law-enforcement, and even landscape photographers are known to use them, as well. They offer the build quality to withstand tough conditions and the optical quality to capture distant subjects clearly. For this conversation, we define “super telephoto” as a lens with a six-degree angle of view, which, on a full-frame sensor, corresponds to a 400mm lens. On APS-C format DSLRs you can get an even longer reach with your super telephotos and, while Fujifilm, Olympus, and Panasonic offer a few super teles for their mirrorless cameras, the ultra-long lenses are still the domain of the professional DSLR. There are high-quality super-telephoto zooms from Sigma and Tamron, but our conversation concentrates on the fast-aperture, prime lenses made by Nikon and Canon. We discuss their unique features, image stabilization systems, filters, methods of support, and the techniques used to handle them effectively. Join us for this very informative episode and, while you are at it, subscribe to our show and check out the B&H Photography Podcast: Canon 5D Mark IV Sweepstakes for your chance to win a Canon 5D Mark IV DSLR or a Canon 80D DSLR! Guests: David Speiser and Chris Williams Hermit Thrush Nelson’s Sparrow Northern Hawk Owl Peregrine Falcon Scissor Tailed Flycatcher Gyrfalcon David Speiser, Allan Weitz, and Chris Williams Previous Pause Next David Speiser DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 06/09/2017
Underwater photography does not have to include sharks, whales, or seals and, for that matter, does not even have to utilize scuba equipment or be near the ocean. Our second episode on underwater photography profiles two photographers who have found their niche shooting wedding, portrait, fashion, and dance themes beneath the surface. Jenna Martin walked away from a career in psychiatry, built her own underwater housing and began using friends and models local to her home in Billings, Montana, to shoot portrait and fine art images. Surprisingly, Martin doesn’t use scuba gear or a wetsuit when shooting in pools, lakes, and oceans—she often utilizes props and, most notably, the texture and flow of fabric to create her sensuous and imaginative photos. Jenna Martin Adolfo Maciocco started as a dive instructor and eventually turned to underwater photography while working in the Red Sea and Thailand. Upon his return to his native Sardinia, Italy, he began to combine his day job as a wedding photographer with his passion for the water, and specializes in underwater wedding photography. He has also collaborated with ballet dancers and free divers in a series of images shot undersea, then flipped upside down to create a wonderful, disorienting effect. from the series, Liquid Dreams Adolfo Maciocco We speak with these two photographers about their technique and gear, and focus on their DIY approach, as well as on issues regarding safety, working with non-professional divers, and the differences between shooting in a pool and in open water. Be sure to chcek out our previous podcast on underwater photography, Black and White and Blue—Fine Art Underwater Photography. Guests: Jenna Martin and Adolfo Maciocco Jenna Martin Adolfo Maciocco DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
0 Plays
Posted 05/26/2017
Today we welcome two photographers from two distant parts of the globe, but both share a sense of a serene underwater world that they envision mostly in black-and-white. Perhaps, surprisingly, Hengki Koentjoro and Christian Vizl claim Ansel Adams as a prime influence on their work, and we talk with them about not only about their artistic influences but about their choice of gear, shooting styles, post-process techniques and safety concerns. We start our episode with Hengki Koentjoro, who is based in Indonesia, and whose work on land and sea is simply stunning. His black-and-white compositions of sea creatures and the interplay between sun and water are more still life than wildlife, as they explore the textures, lines, and shapes found in the waters of his native archipelago. Koentjoro speaks with us about the simple set of tools with which he captures his images and his uncomplicated approach to exploring the waters he knows so well. Hengki Koentjoro Christian Vizl brings a similar perspective to his relationship with the sea, although the creatures he normally photographs tend to be much bigger and faster-moving, and the waters he explores extend across the planet. A life-long diver, Vizl has recently received well-deserved attention for his black-and-white images of rays, sharks, and whales, including a 2017 Sony World Photography Award. His approach places experience before image and his respect for the sea and its animals is evident in all he does and says. Christian Vizl Stay tuned to the end of this show, when we announce a promo code for a 10% discount on all Ikelite camera housings, and, specifically for this episode, we encourage you to visit our podcast landing page to see examples of the images created by these two supremely talented photographers. Guests: Hengki Koentjoro and Christian Vizl Photograph by Hengki Koentjoro Photograph by Hengki Koentjoro Photograph by Christian Vizl Photograph by Christian Vizl Photograph by Christian Vizl DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
1 — 11 of 11 items

Pages

Close

Close

Close