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Posted 09/09/2021
What do the films Goodfellas, The Devil Wears Prada, Creed, Ocean’s 8, and Die Hard with a Vengeance have in common? The poster art, publicity, and behind-the-scenes photography for these and about one hundred other feature films were made by photographer Barry Wetcher, and we welcome Wetcher to this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. On-set still photography or, simply, “still photography” is one of the more unique jobs found under the big tent that is photography. The skills needed to excel in this work incorporate abilities from many photographic genres. Portraiture, documentary, news, action, and still life talents are all called upon to create the images needed for varied purposes, but perhaps the most important skill is the ability to understand the many moving parts and dynamic personalities of a film shoot and to find a way to be everywhere but nowhere at the same time. With Wetcher, we talk about the specific demands of the craft, about the evolution of gear from film to DSLR and, ultimately, to mirrorless (Nikon and FUJIFILM, in Wetcher’s case), and mostly about how to best navigate the world of producers, directors, cinematographers, and actors to create the seemingly ephemeral but truly indelible images of movie history. We also find time to ask Wetcher about some of the legendary actors and directors he has photographed over the years. Join us for this enjoyable and informative chat with Wetcher and, as it turns out, his “Brooklyn Brother,” host Allan Weitz. Guest: Barry Wetcher Photograph © Barry Wetcher Chadwick Boseman in “Marshall,” 2017 © Barry Wetcher/Open Road Films Human Green Screen from “I Am Legend,” 2007 © Barry Wetcher/Warner Bros. Pictures James Gandolfini in “Not Fade Away,” 2012 © Barry Wetcher/Paramount Vantage Joe Pesci in “GoodFellas,” 1990 © Barry Wetcher/ Warner Bros. Pictures Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 08/05/2021
The photos of David Rothenberg are some of the most exciting that we have seen in a while―condensed and entangled compositions of airplanes over urban housing and portraits of travelers, through plane windows, or bathed in a holy light at a train station. His work is provocative, playful, and compassionate and asks us to look at compositions and subjects carefully, addressing issues of isolation and hope. On this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we ask how a fine-art photographer works his way through the neighborhoods and transportation hubs of Queens, NY, making such insightful images. Rothenberg’s books, Landing Lights Park and Roosevelt Station, are wonderful series and, with him, we discuss the evolution of these projects, the gear and locations he chooses, how he interacts with subjects, and the editing and sequencing of the books. Guest: David Rothenberg Photograph (detail) © David Rothenberg From “Roosevelt Station” © David Rothenberg From “Roosevelt Station” © David Rothenberg From “Roosevelt Station” © David Rothenberg From “Roosevelt Station” © David Rothenberg From “Roosevelt Station” © David Rothenberg From “Landing Lights Park” © David Rothenberg From “Landing Lights Park” © David Rothenberg From “Landing Lights Park” © David Rothenberg From “Landing Lights Park” © David Rothenberg From “Landing Lights Park” © David Rothenberg Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 03/18/2021
Eye-catching and grotesque are words not often placed together, but those accurate descriptors are part of the charm and beauty in the still life and food photography of Emma Ressel. Ressel joins us on this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast to talk about her work, which takes inspiration from, among other things, Dutch Master paintings and her own upbringing in Maine. We discuss with Ressel the evolution of her work and how she attempts to balance the genres of food photography and still life. Many of her images contain aspects of decay and death, and in her personal fine art photography, food is one way to address these topics. She also is a commercial photographer of food, wine, and still life work commissioned by New York Magazine, Refinery29, and other publications and clients. Ressel works with both a 4 x 5" Toya medium format film camera and with a Nikon DSLR, and we find out how and why she chooses which system to utilize. We also talk about her varied lighting choices and how she came to food photography not knowing much about professional workflows and food stylists and how that may have helped her define her look. She is very hands-on with her work, and we discuss sourcing items as diverse as coral snakes and pig’s heads. We also consider issues of waste and overconsumption and how her work attempts to deal with those ideas within an industry that uses food for purposes not directly related to human sustenance. Ressel also tells us about an inspiring artists residency in which she tackled the subject of a decaying whale carcass. This is a very well-rounded conversation, at ease discussing the technical issues of using a view camera as easily as literary inspiration, and how to walk the fine line between working as a commercial food photographer and pushing the genre to uncomfortable new places. Join us for a listen and have a look at Ressel’s Artfare page to see her larger prints. Guest: Emma Ressel Photograph © Emma Ressel From “Trouble in the Garden” © Emma Ressel From “Trouble in the Garden” © Emma Ressel From “Trouble in the Garden” © Emma Ressel From “Olives in the Street” © Emma Ressel From “Olives in the Street” © Emma Ressel From “Olives in the Street” © Emma Ressel From “Insatiable Hunger and the Peacock’s Plume” © Emma Ressel Commission for New York Magazine © Emma Ressel Commission for Wines of Sicily/Refinery29 © Emma Ressel © Emma Ressel Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 11/01/2018
When you think of an image from your favorite movie, what comes to mind? Is it a well-edited sequence, a dramatic crescendo, or perhaps simply a static photo, maybe even the poster art itself? If it is a static image, chances are it’s a photo taken by an on-set “still” photographer. On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we discuss this craft with two photographers who make their living  as still photographers, working on location and in-studio on television and film productions alongside the camera assistants, boom operators, grips, DPs and myriad crew members, who make the movie magic. Joining us are  JoJo Whilden, a fine art and still photographer who has worked on numerous films, including Silver Linings Playbook and The Fighter and television series such as Orange Is the New Black, and Homeland. Her clients include HBO, Netflix, CBS, Sony, and Killer Films. She is the 2018 recipient of The Society of Camera Operators Lifetime Achievement Award in Still Photography. Also joining us in the studio is David Giesbrecht, an editorial and still photographer with credits on The House of Cards, The Blacklist, Mr. Robot, Jessica Jones, and many other programs and films. We speak with Giesbrecht and Whilden about the specific photography skills required on-set, the working relationship within a film crew, their gear setup, and the changes that the profession has seen with the onset of digital streaming, cell phones, mirrorless cameras, social media, and the growth of the episodic television series. This is a very informative episode about a craft that is often overlooked and misunderstood. Guests: JoJo Whilden and David Giesbrecht  From “Orange is the New Black”, Photograph Courtesy JoJo Whilden From “Boardwalk Empire”, Photograph Courtesy JoJo Whilden From “Olive Kitteridge”, Photograph Courtesy JoJo Whilden From “A Late Quartet”, Photograph Courtesy JoJo Whilden From “The Fighter”, Photograph Courtesy JoJo Whilden John Turturro directing “Fading Gigolo”, Photograph Courtesy JoJo Whilden From “Jessica Jones”, Photograph Courtesy David Giesbrecht From “Jessica Jones”, Photograph Courtesy David Giesbrecht From “Luke Cage”, Photograph Courtesy David Giesbrecht From “House of Cards”, Photograph Courtesy David Giesbrecht Box art from “The Tick”, Photograph Courtesy David Giesbrecht JoJo Whilden and David Giesbrecht hamming it up in the podcast studio Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/25/2018
Can you imagine a better perspective? On today's episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome two shooting buddies who, perhaps not so coincidentally, happen to be talented and inspirational landscape photographers. Ryan Dyar and Miles Morgan are both well recognized for their gorgeous "land-based" landscape photography and post-production skills, but over the past few years, both have incorporated drone photography into their workflow. Our show today is a discussion of their aesthetic approach, and of the techniques and gear Dyar and Morgan use to make their stylized landscape images using drones. The topics we discuss are the differences between aerial photography and drone photography (Morgan is also a pilot) and, of course, composing from a tripod as opposed to a monitor image relayed from a few hundred feet in the air. We also talk about camera settings, long-exposure photography, drone choices, flying techniques, how to handle inclement weather, scouting locations, and the legal restrictions on drone operation. It is quite an informative episode, but, what also becomes clear is the camaraderie between Dyar and Morgan and how their friendship not only informs when and where they photograph but also how they work, how they view photography as a practice and, certainly, the influence each has upon the other in terms of their shooting styles. Join us for this enjoyable conversation. Guests: Miles Morgan and Ryan Dyar Photograph © Miles Morgan © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/06/2018
The spot where still photography, video, animation, and drawing on your shoes meet is where you can find Sam Cannon and Matthias Brown. They may not always be together at that spot, but they’re sure to be within shouting distance. On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we discuss the role that still photography plays in their work and how they see the distinctions between still and moving images, as well as between old and new technologies. Matthias Brown is also TraceLoops, an “animation experiment centered around hand-drawn, physical animations that experiments with the creation and perception of movement.” He specializes in hand-drawn, stop-motion, black-and-white animation and his work has been commissioned by Converse, MTV, Purina, Warby Parker, and others, and his fine art work has been displayed at the Tate Modern. Sam Cannon is an artist and director who works between still photography and video and focuses on the “manipulation of time, space, and the female form.” Whichever format the final image takes—still, video, GIF—her works asks us to explore the “never-ending” moment. She has produced commercial assignments for Nike, Samsung, and H&M, editorial and fashion pieces, and her fine art work has been exhibited extensively, including at MANA Contemporary, in Jersey City. True multi-disciplinarians, Cannon and Brown are comfortable with a variety of techniques and art forms; we discuss rotoscopes and oscilloscopes, After Effects and Dragonframe, projection pieces and soap sculptures. We also talk briefly on camera gear, self-portraiture, William Kentridge and, once and for all, we resolve the pronunciation of GIF. Join us for this enjoyable conversation. Guests: Sam Cannon and Matthias Brown Animation © Sam Cannon Animation © Sam Cannon Animation © Sam Cannon Animation © Sam Cannon Photo © Sam Cannon Photo © Sam Cannon Animation © Matthias Brown Animation © Matthias Brown Animation © Matthias Brown Animation © Matthias Brown Photo © Matthias Brown Photo © Matthias Brown Previous Pause Next NOTE: Please click to view animated images. Sam Cannon & Matthias Brown provided four animated images, and two still photos. DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/16/2018
As Allan Weitz says in the introduction, when you see a Jeffrey Milstein photo, you know it. He has a distinctive style, which is not an easy accomplishment for an aerial photographer. But, of course, not all his images are taken from high above—he also has an incredible series shot from underneath airplanes. All kidding aside, Milstein’s work—aerial or otherwise—is infused with the complexity of observation and with the fascination of how similar forms repeat themselves in distinctive ways. On this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Jeff Milstein about his photography, with an emphasis on his aerial photography and the process, gear, and technique he uses to capture these stunning images. We discuss his previous career as an architect and the influence that carries into his work, the medium format and 35mm format digital camera he prefers, and his lens choices. Along with Weitz, who also has much aerial photography experience, we discuss using a gyro stabilizer and the advancements made in in-camera stabilization systems. We also chat about communication with pilots and how to plan a helicopter aerial shoot. Milstein also discusses the post-production techniques used to create his geometric compositions and the large format prints he makes, many of which are currently on exhibit at the Benrubi Gallery, in New York. Guest: Jeffrey Milstein Boeing 757-200, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Airbus A340-300, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Boeing 737-700, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Boeing 747-400, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Caribbean Princess, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Carnival Sensation, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Carnival Victory at Night, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein 5th Ave. Midtown, New York, NY, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Park La Brea, Los Angeles, CA, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Stuyvesant Town, New York, NY, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Coney Island, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Disneyland, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Gatwick Airport, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein LAX Airport, Photograph © Jeffrey Milstein Jeffrey Milstein, Photograph © John Harris Jeffrey Milstein and Allan Weitz, Photograph © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/12/2017
A simple twist of fate (OK, I clicked a link) introduced me to the wedding photography of Jide Alakija and I immediately knew he should be a guest on the podcast. His work falls into the category of documentary wedding photography, but the intimate connection he seems to make with his subjects, as well as his compositional skills, place his work above the popular trend of fly-on-the-wall work. He captures moments of humor, tenderness, and joy that many photographers would miss, but still fills a frame the way Grandma wants the photos on her mantel to look. We talk about his composition decisions and shooting techniques, but we also wanted him on the show because his work brings him to many different countries and cultures. With this in mind, we take on numerous aspects of traveling to shoot a wedding, whether that is a "destination" wedding or simply being invited to shoot a wedding far from home. Our conversation includes the practical side of travel—what gear to bring, who to hire as an assistant, how to budget—but we also discuss the intricacies of working in a locale where you are not familiar with the cultural traditions and may not even speak the language. Join us for a lively chat with our new friend, Jide Alakija. Guest: Jide Alakija Jide Alakija and Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next All Photographs by Jide Alakija DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/03/2017
The B&H Photography Podcast team was invited to a special event hosted by DJI and the B&H Marketing team to introduce filmmakers and photographers to the Phantom 4 Pro and Inspire 2 drones. Not only did we get to fly these incredible machines, but we took the time to talk with several photographers and drone experts to get their impressions, not only on the latest DJI models, but on other drone platforms and aerial photography applications. We begin this episode with Adam Lisberg, U.S. spokesperson for DJI, and hear his thoughts on its most recent offerings. We then sit with a previous guest, Randy Scott Slavin, of Yeah Drones and the New York City Drone Film Festival. Slavin discusses the technical leaps that drones have made in the past year, and highlights his favorite platforms. Next, we talk with Andrew Scrivani, food photographer and stylist for the New York Times and other publications, on how he is incorporating drones into his work. After a pause, we turn to a lively chat with Sara Dietschy, Kraig Adams, and Ollie Ritchie, three social media influencers using drones in their content creation. Then we speak with Roberto Blake, a YouTube educator, who took advantage of this event to fly his first drone; he offers wonderful insight from the perspective of a newbie. We then welcome podcasters Chris Barrows and Amir Zonozi, from “ Why I Social,” for information on the P4 Pro and on flying in restricted areas, and we conclude with drone builder and pilot Parker Gyokeres, from Propellerheads Aerial Photography, to get his take on why he switched from homebuilding drones to DJI. Join us for this multifaceted episode on the latest in drone technology, and listen for a B&H Photography Podcast exclusive promo code to get free propellers and a discount on the extended protection plan for the Mavic Pro, from DJI. Guests: Adam Lisberg, Randy Scott Slavin, Andrew Scrivani, Sara Dietschy, Kraig Adams, Ollie Ritchie, Roberto Blake, Chris Barrows, Amir Zonozi, and Parker Gyokeres Photographs © John R Harris The DJI Inspire 2 Drone Flying the Phantom 4 Pro on the roof of the Bathhouse Studio Randy Scott Slavin and Allan Weitz Andrew Scrivani Kraig Adams, Ollie Ritchie, Allan Weitz and Sara Dietschy Parker Gyokeres with the Inspire 2 My first photo taken with a drone DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/08/2016
Drones are definitely a hot-button topic and not only for photographers! Despite the controversy and legal conundrums, aerial photography is entering an incredible exciting era with the proliferation of drones. Director and photographer, Randy Slavin, founder of Yeah Drones and the New York City Drone Film Festival, provides his enthusiastic input, with product specialist Dan Campo, to a conversation about the use and misuse of drones. We talk about the legal and safety issues of flying drones, as well as the practical applications of drone shooting and, of course, highlight the best and latest in gear for the drone photographer. Randy, Dan, and our host, Allan, pepper our conversation with anecdotes from their experiences flying and filming with drones.  Guests: Randy Scott Slavin and Dan Campo Randy Scott Slavin   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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