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Posted 06/10/2021
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we take a deep dive into the technical, legal, and even theoretical topics surrounding Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) and their growing place in the art and photography worlds. To take on this subject, we welcome cryptocurrency expert and past guest of the show, Drew Hinkes. Hinkes is an attorney and professor and, in 2017, was nominated as one of Coindesk’s Most Influential People in Blockchain. He is also co-founder and General Counsel of Athena Blockchain, a firm focused on tokenized investment products. We also welcome Derek Paul Jack Boyle and Mitra Saboury, who together make up the art collaborative Meatwreck. Meatwreck has recently minted and sold NFTs associated with its art and we ask Boyle and Saboury how the process worked and their general thoughts on NFTs in relation to community and their art work. In addition to clearing some of the murky waters surrounding NFTs, cryptocurrency, and smart contracts, this episode discusses the future of intellectual property and how the blockchain is changing the way we value, store, resell, and protect our copyrighted images. Join us for this in-depth and informative conversation. Guests: Drew Hinkes, Derek Paul Jack Boyle, Mitra Saboury Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 04/22/2021
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we focus on the work of photographer Todd Webb and, specifically, the series of images he created in Africa in 1958, while on assignment for the United Nations. We are joined by Betsy Evans Hunt, the Executive Director of the Todd Webb Archive, and by Aimée Bessire and Erin Hyde Nolan, coauthors of the new book, Todd Webb in Africa—Outside the Frame. With our guests, we discuss the photographic career of Todd Webb, including his work in New York and Paris in the 1940s and 1950s, and the founding and mission of the Todd Webb Archive. Our primary topic, however, is the rediscovery (in a steamer trunk) and eventual archiving and publishing of Webb’s photographs taken in several African nations over the course of a multi-month assignment organized by the United Nations. The images are notable not only for their fateful recovery but for their large and medium format color composition and intelligent eye; they tell a vibrant story of Africa at a moment between colonization and independence. With authors Bessire and Nolan, we discuss the making of their book, which is both a photography book of unique vision and a multifaceted study of the images themselves, with essays and interviews providing historical context and cultural and artistic analysis. Join us for this conversation on the work of an overlooked 20th-century master photographer and on a sweeping series of color photos that sat unseen for almost 60 years. Guests: Betsy Evans Hunt, Aimée Bessire, and Erin Hyde Nolan Photograph © Todd Webb Cover, “Todd Webb in Africa – Outside the Frame” © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive © Todd Webb, 1958/Todd Webb Archive Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 09/16/2020
As museums in New York and around the world begin to reopen in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, a brand-new museum is facing the challenge of its grand reopening in the competitive New York City art and culture world. We welcome the inaugural Director of Exhibitions of Fotografiska, Amanda Hajjar, to the B&H Photography Podcast to discuss the unique model of this for-profit arts center and its plans to make a mark on the photography scene in New York. After opening, in December 2019, Fotografiska New York was forced to close after just ninety days and, of course, we will also ask Hajjar how they handled the quarantine disruption and are adjusting to the new protocols placed on museums. Fotografiska New York is the third of three like-named museums, with more scheduled to open around the world. The original began in Stockholm, Sweden, in 2010, and adopted a different paradigm than the traditional museum—it displays a wide range of photography styles, it has no permanent collection, and it works with the artists themselves to design the exhibitions. It also relies on admission sales, as well as café, restaurant, and special event business to generate income. It created much buzz in the months before opening in New York, and its initial reviews were positive, for its events and photo exhibition programming. We speak with Hajjar about the museum’s exhibition philosophy and how its model facilitates an institution able to react to and comment on current social issues, as well as examine relevant images from the past. We discuss its attempt to create a hybrid between gallery and museum and shine a light on its current exhibitions, including works by Cooper & Gorfer and by Martin Schoeller. Finally, we get to the bottom of what the word Fotografiska really means. Join us for this enjoyable conversation. Guest: Amanda Hajjar Photograph courtesy Fotografiska Israa With Yellow Boxes, 2020 © Cooper & Gorfer Yellow Roseline, 2020 © Cooper & Gorfer Gary Drinkhard, 2019, video and sound installation © Martin Schoeller Kwame Ajamu, 2019, video and sound installation. © Martin Schoeller Ezra, 2019 © Julie Blackmon. Courtesy the artist and Robert Mann Gallery The Shan Hai Jing Hotel Room 002, 2019 © Zhongjia Sun Untitled, 2019 © Cristina Bartley Dominguez The Church Mission Building, 2019. Courtesy Fotografiska Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/21/2020
We present a fun and insightful conversation on this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, perhaps due to the Midwestern charm of photographer Julie Blackmon and the enjoyable discussion of her wonderful tableaux vivants of family life in middle America. We also welcome back to the show gallery owner Robert Mann, who is currently hosting an exhibit of Blackmon’s photographs titled Talent Show. Mann was a guest on our show, in 2018, when we spoke about the work of Australian photographer Murray Fredericks. The medium format compositions of Julie Blackmon infuse innocent playtime with a creeping sense of danger to create works with a wonderful dark humor. There is also a welcome DIY spirit to her work, and we talk about the creation of her photos and the involvement of her own family and friends in the images; even photos that have up to twenty-five subjects are produced and organized with her sisters and fellow parents.  She is hands-on in all aspects of the work, including making the large prints herself. We also talk about her use of the Hasselblad H system and how she combines wide angle and normal perspectives in her detailed final prints. After a break, Robert Mann takes the lion’s share of the questions as we discuss the many challenges faced by photography galleries. In addition to the expense of a brick and mortar gallery and the proliferation of online viewing and sales, the COVID-19 pandemic has forever changed the idea of a public art gallery.  Mann relates the decision to close his Chelsea gallery and receive collectors on a by-appointment basis, as well as his thoughts on creating editions and limiting prints and the general state of the fine art photo market. Join us for this enlightening four-way conversation as we gain insight from the perspective of the artist and the gallerist. Guests: Julie Blackmon and Robert Mann Photograph © Julie Blackmon River, 2020 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Baby Toss, 2009 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Stock Tank, 2012 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Talent Show, 2019 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Outing, 2019 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Spray Paint, 2020 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/19/2020
As an industry and as a hobby, the numbers indicate that drone flying and drone photography are still primarily the domain of men, but sustaining this disparity is ridiculous and it should and will change. Our two guests today are part of bringing about that change, and they do so by being good at their craft, by spreading the joy of flying, and teaching drone operation and photography to women and girls. Our first guest today is an Emmy Award-winning camerawoman for CBS News and F.A.A. licensed drone pilot Carmaine Means, who incorporates quadcopter footage into her news coverage and, of course, flies for fun. After a break, we are joined by Yasmin Tajik, a documentary photographer and F.A.A. licensed drone operator who is also the Brand Ambassador Director for the educational and advocacy group Women Who Drone. We get to know the work of each guest, asking Means how and when she decides to use aerial footage in a news segment, what her personal guidelines are for launching a drone, and what the planning stage is like with her producers. We also talk about the value of certain aerial shots in telling a story, about the equipment she uses, and handling the drones in various conditions. Currently, she flies with a DJI Phantom and an Inspire. With Yasmin Tajik, we mention the Federal Aviation Administration licensing process and she recommends the FAA Drone Zone as a good place to start. We also ask her about using drones in documentary work and some of the restrictions placed on flying in the U.S. and other countries. As a resident of Arizona, she discusses some of the advantages of flying in that state, as well as unique guidelines they have established. We also speak about how she learned to fly after initially being hesitant, the work done by Women Who Drone, and taking her Tello Quadcopter into schools and the interest it generates from the next generation of flyers. Tajik also points to the many industries and services that are incorporating drones and the growing opportunities available for licensed pilots, but we don’t forget to talk about the joy she gets by using her DJI Mavic 2 to provide a perspective on the world that our land-based cameras can never match. Join us for this enjoyable and inspirational conversation and if you are a female drone flyer, we’d love to hear your experiences and see your images. Guests: Carmaine Means and Yasmin Tajik Photograph © Yasmin Tajik​ © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik Courtesy Yasmin Tajik © Carmaine Means © Carmaine Means © Carmaine Means Courtesy Carmaine Means Carmaine Means © Phillip Dembinsky Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/11/2020
It’s easy to admire Sebastian Meyer, not simply because he’s a talented photographer who also co-founded the first photojournalism agency in Iraq, but because he is confident enough to speak of his shortcomings, his naiveté, and of tragedy. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome Meyer to discuss his “love at first sight” for photojournalism, the Metrography photo agency he opened in Iraqi Kurdistan, and how he lost a colleague and friend to the violence of the war against ISIS. We also laugh a bunch during this episode and talk about being an “arrogant white guy,” how research can create preconceived ideas, the tropes of war photography, a bit about gear, and about the conditional nature of journalistic standards and freedom of the press. After a short break, we learn of Meyer’s involvement in a prolonged hostage situation, his return to photojournalism, and how his new book, Under Every Yard of Sky, is not only a beautiful chronicle of modern Iraqi Kurdistan, in war and in peace, but is also a tribute to a friend taken too soon. Join us for this wonderful conversation that touches on so many important issues of the contemporary documentary and photojournalism. Guest: Sebastian Meyer Manchester, United Kingdom 2005. Photograph © Sebastian Meyer Manchester, United Kingdom 2005. Photograph © Sebastian Meyer cover of Under Every Yard of Sky by Sebastian Meyer, 2019 from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer from Under Every Yard of Sky, Photograph © Sebastian Meyer Friends and family of Kamaran grieve after hearing the news of his death, 2014. Photograph © Sebastian Meyer Sebastian and Kamaran, Photograph courtesy Sebastian Meyer Allan Weitz and Sebastian Meyer, 2020. Photograph © John Harris Sebastian Meyer on the B&H Photography Podcast, 2020. Photograph © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/08/2020
During a little holiday trip, producer John Harris made a visit to the gallery and studio of photographer Clyde Butcher. For anyone who grew up in Florida, Butcher’s work should be very familiar; his photography is often found on the walls of local libraries, municipal buildings, and, as Miami native Jason Tables points out, “every doctor’s office I’ve ever been in.” Butcher’s images of the Florida landscapes, particularly of the Everglades, are legendary, and although he has a brisk print-sales business, many of the photos in libraries have the attached placard, “Donated by Clyde Butcher.” Although he is known primarily for his large format black-and-white photography of “the swamp,” Butcher’s photographic career extends back many decades and includes architectural photography, mountain and western landscapes, filmed documentaries, and decorative color photography. Interestingly, Butcher began his career selling prints at small art fairs and, in the 1970s, he had a thriving business selling thousands of prints through department stores such as Sears and Montgomery Ward. This episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is a casual conversation that glides through several topics, including Butcher’s work with large format cameras, his recent foray into Sony digital cameras paired with Canon tilt-shift lenses, the incredible set of vintage enlargers in his giant darkroom space, the business models he and his family employ to market his images, water conservation, and, of course, his relationship to the Florida landscape for which he will be forever linked. Join us for this conversation with a true master. Guest: Clyde Butcher Above photograph © Clyde Butcher Tamiani Trail © Clyde Butcher Cigar Orchid Pond © Clyde Butcher Ochopee © Clyde Butcher Big Cypress © Clyde Butcher Moonrise © Clyde Butcher Plaja-S’Arenella-with-Boat, from Salvador Dali series © Clyde Butcher Cadaques, from Salvador Dali series © Clyde Butcher Cap-de-Creus, from Salvador Dali series © Clyde Butcher Clocks by Clyde Butcher circa, 1970s © Clyde Butcher Clyde Butcher and John Harris © Niki Butcher Niki and Clyde Butcher © John Harris Clyde Butcher in his Venice, Florida office © John Harris Butcher workshop and darkroom, 2019 © John Harris Niki Butcher with enlarger, 2019 © John Harris Clyde Butcher in Movie Dome with 11 x 14" view camera © Clyde Butcher Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/25/2019
When one of the world’s most “followed” photographers is available for a conversation, you make the time to talk with him, and when that photographer is acclaimed adventure, landscape, travel, and surf photographer Chris Burkard, expect that conversation to include some serious insights into the passion and ambition it takes to create the beautiful images he makes. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Burkard about a range of subjects—and this conversation does not disappoint. We get right into it by asking about his penchant for shooting in frigid locations, and how stubbornness and even persistence can be the enemy of good photography in sub-zero temperatures. We discuss the composition of his photographs and how that is indicative of his views on nature, and we dig into his “origin story” and why clients began to come to him for the kind of photography he creates. In general, however, we stick to the nuts and bolts of his photography. We learn why he prefers mirrorless cameras, specifically the Sony Alpha a7R IV, how he organizes his commercial workflow to make time for the adventures he craves, and how he sets time aside to be with his young family. After a break, we ask Burkard to walk us through the creation of a few of his best-known images. Not only does he offer insight into the photographic aspects, but he elaborates to give us a better understanding of the remote locations he finds and the teamwork needed. To quote Burkard, “to better understand how the Earth was made, we must look at it from new perspectives.” Join us for this eye-opening conversation. Guest: Chris Burkard Aleutian Islands, 2013 © Chris Burkard Westfjord, Iceland, 2016 © Chris Burkard Highlining in Joshua Tree with Garrison Rowland on Hall of Horrors formation during the Supermoon, 2016 © Chris Burkard Skógar, Iceland, 2014 © Chris Burkard Westfjord, Iceland, 2016 © Chris Burkard Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/24/2019
For this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we took our portable recorders to an elegant mansion along Central Park, which had been decked out by Sony as a series of stylized photography sets, complete with full lighting, backdrops, and models. They also happened to have on hand many brand-new Sony Alpha a7R IV Mirrorless Digital Cameras and hundreds of lenses for the guests to shoot with in these mini studios. Let’s not forget about the great music, delicious food, and open bar Sony provided. All in all, it was a wonderful event to celebrate the highest megapixel full-frame camera on the market. Sony invited many impressive photographers, writers, influencers, retailers, and… us. And we made our way through the many rooms, speaking with Sony representatives and photographers, getting their first impressions of this latest incarnation of the Alpha a7R series. Needless to say, people were impressed and, after seeing the specs and handling this new camera, so were we. Our first guest is Michael Bubolo, Senior National Manager from Sony PRO Support. We sat with Bubolo before the crowds arrived and were able to go over some of the upgrades and features and get his thoughts on what makes this camera stand out from previous models. Next, we welcome the one and only Ken Rockwell to ask his thoughts on the camera and anything else he wanted to talk about. After a short break, we speak with visual artist Lori Grinker about her potential uses for the a7R IV and, then, with landscape and travel photographer Jude Allen, who happened to be in town from San Francisco, about his first impressions after handling the camera. Finally, we sit down with Sony Artisans Andy Katz and Colby Brown, who both had had the opportunity to shoot the new camera for a couple of weeks and report back on the features they most appreciate for the specific work they do. Join us for this in-depth look at the latest Sony full-frame mirrorless camera, and let us know if you are ready to upgrade. Guests: Michael Bubolo, Ken Rockwell, Lori Grinker, Jude Allen, Andy Katz, and Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Andy Katz created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown created with the new Sony Alpha a7R IV camera © Colby Brown © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/22/2019
Adriane Ohanesian has been on the B&H Photography Podcast in the past and we are very excited to welcome her back to discuss her photojournalistic work in Africa. As many of our listeners will recall, Ohanesian contributed to our podcast throughout 2017 in a serial segment we called “ Dispatch,” in which she provided monthly reports on her freelance assignments covering conflict and climate change in Sudan and Somalia. She also narrated the story of a deadly attack she survived while covering a story on illegal mining in Congo. It was a harrowing and tragic account that demonstrates the lengths to which photojournalists will go to cover a story. On today’s episode, Ohanesian updates us on a few of the items we discussed in 2017, including the illegal mining story and her assignment on the last white male rhinoceros in existence, which has since died. She also talks about a recent assignment for National Geographic, covering illegal mining and deforestation in Madagascar, and her work back in Congo covering an Ebola outbreak. In addition, Ohanesian provides insight into her life as a freelance photojournalist, reflects on incorporating video and audio into her workflow to get important stories told, and offers tips on the gear she uses for her arduous and often very remote assignments. Adriane Ohanesian is a respected photojournalist living in Nairobi and covering news stories throughout East Africa. Her coverage of the civil war in South Sudan garnered her a 2016 World Press Photo Award and she is also the recipient of the 2016 Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award. Join us for this compelling and inspirational episode. Guest: Adriane Ohanesian Marcellina, (center), who survived the militia attack, stands at attention over the grave of her colleague, Antopo Selemani, during the funeral of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve rangers outside of the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 17, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian Okapi Wildlife Reserve park rangers help to lower the body of their young porter, Lokana Tingiti, into the ground during the funeral of the rangers outside of the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 17, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian A woman cries over the grave of Léopold Ngbekusa during the funeral of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve rangers, outside of the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 17, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian Two men who were caught with eight diamonds, and who were mining inside of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve, were arrested and held by park rangers at their headquarters, in the town of Epulu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, July 12, 2017. © Adriane Ohanesian Men shovel and pump water at the Bemainty sapphire mining site, inside of the Ankeniheny- Zahamena Corridor (CAZ), a protected area in Madagascar. Beginning in 2015, when the sapphire rush was first underway, this section quickly became a threat to the rain forest’s flora and fauna, July 29, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Diego Salimoali, age 37, stands with a pet brown lemur as he watches men work in the largest sapphire mining site in Bemainty, July 29, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Laurence Asma, age 41, shows off sapphires that she, her husband, and team of about twenty workers found in the largest mining site in Bemainty, inside of the Ankeniheny- Zahamena Corridor (CAZ), a protected area in Madagascar, July 28, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Roki, a black-and-white ruffed lemur, and Bridola, a brown lemur, are kept as pets in the back of a restaurant and shop, in a community of artisanal gold and sapphire miners living in Ambodipaiso, inside of the Ankeniheny- Zahamena Corridor (CAZ), a protected area in Madagascar, July 29, 2018. © Adriane Ohanesian Healthcare workers pause for a photo as they finish dressing in their Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) at the beginning of the morning shift at the treatment center, in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic in North Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 5, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Ebola survivor and "Guardian of the Ill," Pamela Kiyangaliya, age 33, gets dressed in her Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) as she prepares to start her morning shift at the treatment center, in Butembo, the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic in North Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, March 5, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Ebola responders with an armed police escort run with one of two coffins to be buried at the cemetery, on a hill in Butembo, in North Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. The responders have been a frequent target in attacks by community members and militias, March 6, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal The cemetery where Pamela Kiyangaliya’s sister is buried with many others who died from Ebola, on a hill above Butembo, Democratic Republic of Congo. According to the World Health Organization, there have been 848 confirmed cases and 509 confirmed deaths in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, March 6, 2019. © Adriane Ohanesian for The Wall Street Journal Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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