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Posted 08/26/2021
Even if you are not currently on your beach vacation, let’s take a little trip to Hawaii’s shores for today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. Joining us is photographer Zak Noyle, who was born and raised in Hawaii and began publishing his surf photography while still in high school. Noyle has photographed the sport’s top surfers and events, has been published in Sports Illustrated and National Geographic, and has traveled the world for brands such as Billabong, Stussy, and Chanel. He also contracts commercial and editorial work (note our chat about photographing Michael Phelps) and has recently opened the Eleven17 Creative Agency. With Noyle we discuss how he started photographing simply to share his love for the ocean and surfing, but we learn that his father is a successful commercial photographer and we chat about the influence and support of family and friends. We also learn that Noyle was a state champion swimmer and how staying in top physical and mental shape is key to working in waves up to sixty feet high. We also discuss the techniques and gear he uses to work below and at the water’s surface, including the signature camera housing that he developed with Aquatech. In this pleasant and wide-ranging conversation, we get to understand how keeping a healthy balance between work and play can spark creativity and how preparation and experience lead to opportunity. Join us in “paradise.” Guest: Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Photograph © Zak Noyle Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 08/10/2018
There is no doubt that a film photography renaissance is in full swing… just ask anyone under the age of 25. And to be fair, there are many wonderful artists—of all ages—who have never stopped using film as their primary photographic format. To anyone who grew up shooting film and then made the transition to digital, it’s a bit curious to see such a resurgence in a medium that has long been listed as “critical,” if not simply dead. At the B&H Photography Podcast, we still shoot with film cameras and enjoy the processes involved, but the guests on today’s episode are putting money (and time and energy) where their mouths are and have opened up a physical store (in addition to their online business) selling film and film cameras. Brooklyn Film Camera, located in Bushwick, Brooklyn, sells film and film cameras—from 35mm to medium format, disposables to underwater, pinholes to Polaroid. They are one of a few shops in the world to offer expert restoration services for Polaroid SX-70 and SLR 680 camera systems. They have a brisk online business but are also a local hub, offering repairs, photo tours, and a home base for a burgeoning community of film shooters. We speak with Kyle Depew and Julien Piscioneri about their company’s origin as an outgrowth of the Impossible Project, and about the services they provide, but we also discuss the who, why, and where of the analog renaissance and whether this is a trend, or if film and digital will co-exist peacefully. We are also joined by Michael Armato, of the B&H Used Department, and former proprietor of Armato Cameras, in Queens, NY. Armato brings his insight from running a camera store for more than forty years and sheds light on which film cameras and formats are most in demand at the used counter. Join us for this enjoyable chat. Guests: Kyle Depew, Julien Piscioneri, and Michael Armato Courtesy of Brooklyn Film Camera Courtesy of Brooklyn Film Camera Courtesy of Brooklyn Film Camera B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Michael Armato keeps 'em laughing © John Harris Julien Piscioneri ©John Harris Kyle DePew © John Harris Michael Armato © John Harris Julien Piscioneri, Michael Armato, Kyle DePew, and Allan Weitz © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/09/2017
Underwater photography does not have to include sharks, whales, or seals and, for that matter, does not even have to utilize scuba equipment or be near the ocean. Our second episode on underwater photography profiles two photographers who have found their niche shooting wedding, portrait, fashion, and dance themes beneath the surface. Jenna Martin walked away from a career in psychiatry, built her own underwater housing and began using friends and models local to her home in Billings, Montana, to shoot portrait and fine art images. Surprisingly, Martin doesn’t use scuba gear or a wetsuit when shooting in pools, lakes, and oceans—she often utilizes props and, most notably, the texture and flow of fabric to create her sensuous and imaginative photos. Jenna Martin Adolfo Maciocco started as a dive instructor and eventually turned to underwater photography while working in the Red Sea and Thailand. Upon his return to his native Sardinia, Italy, he began to combine his day job as a wedding photographer with his passion for the water, and specializes in underwater wedding photography. He has also collaborated with ballet dancers and free divers in a series of images shot undersea, then flipped upside down to create a wonderful, disorienting effect. from the series, Liquid Dreams Adolfo Maciocco We speak with these two photographers about their technique and gear, and focus on their DIY approach, as well as on issues regarding safety, working with non-professional divers, and the differences between shooting in a pool and in open water. Be sure to chcek out our previous podcast on underwater photography, Black and White and Blue—Fine Art Underwater Photography. Guests: Jenna Martin and Adolfo Maciocco Jenna Martin Adolfo Maciocco DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/26/2017
Today we welcome two photographers from two distant parts of the globe, but both share a sense of a serene underwater world that they envision mostly in black-and-white. Perhaps, surprisingly, Hengki Koentjoro and Christian Vizl claim Ansel Adams as a prime influence on their work, and we talk with them about not only about their artistic influences but about their choice of gear, shooting styles, post-process techniques and safety concerns. We start our episode with Hengki Koentjoro, who is based in Indonesia, and whose work on land and sea is simply stunning. His black-and-white compositions of sea creatures and the interplay between sun and water are more still life than wildlife, as they explore the textures, lines, and shapes found in the waters of his native archipelago. Koentjoro speaks with us about the simple set of tools with which he captures his images and his uncomplicated approach to exploring the waters he knows so well. Hengki Koentjoro Christian Vizl brings a similar perspective to his relationship with the sea, although the creatures he normally photographs tend to be much bigger and faster-moving, and the waters he explores extend across the planet. A life-long diver, Vizl has recently received well-deserved attention for his black-and-white images of rays, sharks, and whales, including a 2017 Sony World Photography Award. His approach places experience before image and his respect for the sea and its animals is evident in all he does and says. Christian Vizl Stay tuned to the end of this show, when we announce a promo code for a 10% discount on all Ikelite camera housings, and, specifically for this episode, we encourage you to visit our podcast landing page to see examples of the images created by these two supremely talented photographers. Guests: Hengki Koentjoro and Christian Vizl Photograph by Hengki Koentjoro Photograph by Hengki Koentjoro Photograph by Christian Vizl Photograph by Christian Vizl Photograph by Christian Vizl DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/10/2017
Today’s episode broadens our normal photographic sphere as we discuss ophthalmic photography and how the eye’s own optical system is used in conjunction with camera equipment—some techniques very common, some not so—to examine the interior of the eye and to diagnose illnesses that go far beyond problems with vision. We are joined by Mark Maio, clinical medical and ophthalmic photographer and developer of the first high-resolution digital imaging system in ophthalmology. We talk with Maio about his early interest in social justice photography, working as a “jack-of-all-trades” photographer for a hospital, and how his eventual concentration in ophthalmic photography led to early adoption of digital technology and the development of a tool that helped to transform the industry. Throughout this conversation, we learn about the use of analog and digital photography in the biomedical field and how fundus cameras and other specialized gear are used to diagnose optical and systemic maladies. When the pupil is dilated, they eye becomes a portal into the body, and with the proper tools, we can see inside our corporeal system without cutting. Maio is also an accomplished fine art and documentary photographer, and we will also discuss how these various disciplines have intersected throughout his career and resulted in the workshops he leads on ophthalmic imaging, documentary, and landscape photography on the beautiful Isle of Skye. Guest: Mark Maio From the series Saving Sight-- The Flying Eye Hospital From the series Against the Grain – Buffalo Grain Industry From the series, Isle of Skye Previous Pause Next All photographs by Mark Maio DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/14/2016
Are dance and photography natural enemies? Well, of course not, but one art form is about the still, captured moment, and the other about choreographed movement and fluidity. However, anyone who truly understands photography knows the importance of timing, grace, and harmony, and a dancer must also recognize the relevance of rest and static. Sculpture, or gesture perhaps, is their common bond and our two guests know well the significance of gesture and the conflicting and compatible characteristics of dance and photography. They join us to talk about their distinct work and shooting styles. Lois Greenfield is one of the recognized masters of the craft, having developed a singular style sought by the world’s most renowned dance companies, and Omar Z Robles, an official Fujifilm X-Photographer, brings a fresh take, blending aspects of documentary and street photography. Enjoy this episode as we discuss improvisation, inspiration, dodging taxis and, of course, lighting systems and camera and lens choices. Guests: Lois Greenfield and Omar Z. Robles   Photographs by ©  Lois Greenfield Photographs by ©  Omar Z. Robles   Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play           Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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