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Posted 02/11/2021
When we started the B&H Photography Podcast more than six years ago, the concept was “watercooler conversations” with photographers, about gear. Well, honestly, it hasn’t always turned out that way, but this episode with famed photojournalist David Burnett comes as close to that idea as any we have done; there’s barely an edit in the whole episode. Burnett joins us, and we just talk. We begin with his coverage of the recent presidential inauguration and his decision to use a 1930 Graflex 4 x 5 camera in addition to his Sony mirrorless with an FE 100-400mm lens. Burnett reflects on the reasons he incorporates vintage cameras and lenses into his workflow and the need to challenge your own point of view as a photographer. We discuss the motivations that bring a particular camera to his eye and his sense of “obligation to all that has come before.” In the second half of the show, we talk about using legacy glass on mirrorless cameras and the relentless (and at times “goofy”) experimentation that both Burnett (and Allan) enjoy. From aerial reconnaissance lenses to old Kodak cine lenses, there is nothing that can’t be adapted, and we go into the weeds to discuss some of the many, many lenses Burnett has not just tried, but used successfully for his professional assignments. We also ask about the new Sony Alpha 1, the benefits of customizable functions, and his preference for the Sony a9 II and a6600 cameras. Join us for this easy-going conversation. Guest: David Burnett Photograph © David Burnett A soldier with a letter from home, Lang Vei, Vietnam, 1971 © 2020 David Burnett/Contact Press Images Bob Marley, 1976 © 2020 David Burnett/Contact Press Images Al Gore on the presidential campaign trail, 2001 © David Burnett/ Contact Press Images John Kerry in the last days of the presidential campaign, Manchester, New Hampshire, 2004 © David Burnett /Contact Press Images Daniel Céspedes arrested by the Chilean military, 1973 © 2020 David Burnett/Contact Press Images Ayatollah Khomeini, spiritual leader of the Iran Revolution, 1979 © 2020 David Burnett/Contact Press Images Mary Decker looks on in pain after colliding with Zola Budd and falling during the 3000-meter race at the 1984 Olympics, in Los Angeles © 2020 David Burnett/Contact Press Images Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/02/2018
This week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast posits the notion that we are in a new “Golden Age” of landscape photography, and a fundamental attribute of this landscape photography is its embracing of digital and mobile technologies. From soaring ISO capabilities and improved dynamic range to stacking and correction software to weather, mapping, and pre-production apps, the willing photographer can plan and execute landscape images that would have been impossible to create only a few short years ago. We also suggest that the Pacific Northwest, with its proximity to the cradle of the tech industry and a spectrum of natural wonders, is the hub of this progressive landscape photography movement. Veteran photographers have adopted new technologies and created a movement, and a younger generation is following suit, certain to take landscape photography into a future that includes drones, VR, and imaging technologies yet to be imagined. We also discuss the influence of photo-sharing platforms and new career models that enable photographers to distribute their work and travel to destinations that editorial assignments would never cover. We welcome to our conversation two preëminent landscape photographers, Erin Babnik and Sean Bagshaw, who discuss their work and the use of the high-tech gear and applications in the creation of their photography. In addition to the obligatory Q and A about camera and lens choices, we discuss location and weather apps, post-process plug-ins, and even the latest foul-weather gear, all of which enable them to create the stunning work for which they are known. Both photographers are members of Photo Cascadia, and have a wide following of supporters and students. Their workshops sell out months in advance. After hearing their insights and seeing their imagery, there will be no doubt as to why. Also, at the end of today’s episode, we announce the winners of our Canon 5D Mark IV sweepstakes. Guests: Erin Babnik and Sean Bagshaw The Lost Ark © Erin Babnik Enigma © Erin Babnik Kairos © Erin Babnik Rhapsody in Blue © Erin Babnik Requiem © Erin Babnik Catching Air © Erin Babnik Wood and Stone © Sean Bagshaw The Gift Tree © Sean Bagshaw Summer Seclusion © Sean Bagshaw Mostnica Autumn © Sean Bagshaw Okshornan Peaks © Sean Bagshaw Bohinj Woods © Sean Bagshaw Lineage © Sean Bagshaw Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/29/2017
For the B&H Photography Podcast, 2017 has been a wonderful year. We published our 100 th episode, surpassed one million downloads, and reached #1 on the iTunes podcast chart in the Visual Arts category. Achievements aside, we are simply pleased with the remarkable guests we have hosted on our show, the variety of subjects we have covered, and the consistently entertaining and intelligent conversations we have published. And honestly, we are proud to have maintained our production output—week in week out—and to still really enjoy what we do. With this in mind and with gratitude to our listeners, guests, co-workers, and the management at B&H, we have cobbled together a 2017 year-in-review episode in which we discuss our favorite shows from 2017 and play a few clips of the most interesting moments from these episodes. The highlights were many and hard to narrow down, but Allan Weitz chose our episode with photographer Lynn Goldsmith as his favorite, with a close second being our talk with Bellamy Hunt, aka the Japan Camera Hunter. He also mentioned our talks with Richard Drew on his photograph, referred to as “Falling Man,” and our episodes with photojournalists (and husband and wife) Ben Lowy and Marvi Lacar. As for Jason Tables, he pointed to History of Hip-Hop Photography and Night Photography—From Film into Digital, as his favorites. My list included a few of those mentioned above, as well as an episode on social documentary projects and the clip I chose from our serial segment, “Dispatch,” with Adriane Ohanesian, in which she recounts the story of a fatal attack she survived while covering a story in Congo. We discuss several more episodes during this end-of-year extravaganza and hope that the clips pique your interest and inspire you to subscribe to our show and check out programs from our catalog, which now includes more than 100 episodes. Thank you and happy New Year from Allan, Jason, and John. Guests: Lynn Goldsmith, Bellamy Hunt, Richard Drew, Ben Lowy, Marvi Lacar, Danny Hastings, Eric Johnson, Janette Beckman, Vicky Tobak, Chris Nicholson, Lance Keimig, Adriane Ohanesian   Jason Tables, Allan Weitz, and John Harris   Jolene Lupo, Penumbra Foundation DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/15/2017
From where do all the celebrity photos in People, Us Weekly, Vanity Fair, and other magazines come? They come from hard-working professional photographers plying their trade, and the agencies that distribute and license these images, of course. On today's episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we will discuss the nuts and bolts of working in the celebrity and fashion news business—from the point of view of the agency and of the photographer. There is no shortage of entertainment news photos, many of which are taken on the "red carpet" and through a collaborative network of celebrities, publicists, photographers, and agencies. Others, shot in less controlled settings, are a product of a photographer's instinct and dogged persistence. This type—for good or bad—we call paparazzi photos. Arranged portrait sessions, concerts, and press conferences can also fall into this category of celebrity "news" and our guests, having experience in all the above, will discuss the distinctions between these, as well as the ins and outs of making a living in this arena. We welcome Chris Doherty, founder and owner of Instar Images. With offices in New York, London, and Australia, Instar is one of the top independent agencies specializing in entertainment news and events. We also speak with photographer Jennifer Graylock of Graylock.com, recipient of the 2017 Top Red Carpet Photographer Award. In addition to her work for celebrity and corporate clients, her photos often grace the pages of People, TV Guide, InStyle, and Glamour magazines. We ask Doherty what agencies look for in a photographer and what makes a good celebrity image. We also discuss the varying clients he works with, Instar's website and archive, payment structures, and changes in the industry in the wake of smartphones and social media. Graylock brings the photographer's perspective and talks about gear choices, protocol within the "pen," protecting your copyright, and how to maintain relationships, get access, and stay "current."  Join us for this very informative episode. Guests: Chris Doherty and Jennifer Graylock Prince Harry and Meghan Markle © Doug Peters / Courtesy of Instar Images Jessica Biel © Lionel Hahn / Courtesy of Instar Images Nicole Kidman © Munawar Hosain /Courtesy of Instar Images Mick Jagger, Courtesy of Instar Images Paris Hilton © Karl Larsen / Courtesy of Instar Images Matt Lauer © Matt Agudo / Courtesy of Instar Images Adele © Jennifer Graylock-Graylock.com Jennifer Hough © Jennifer Graylock-Graylock.com Kate Middleton and Prince William © Jennifer Graylock-Graylock.com Jennifer Lopez © Jennifer Graylock-Graylock.com Furry fingernails, backstage at the Libertine fashion show © Jennifer Graylock-Graylock.com Cate Blanchett and Eddie Redmayne © Jennifer Graylock-Graylock.com Chris Doherty and Allan Weitz © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/20/2017
We are living in a Golden Age of landscape photography. Digital cameras and improved software enable the kind of imaging that until recently was only possible via the budgets of large publications and the talents and ambitions of a few select photographers. Ambition and talent remain, and with enhanced dynamic range and color algorithms, higher sensitivity settings, simplified stitching and compositing software, and a network of websites to display work, impressive landscape photography is abundant; however,  there are new masters and the skill set of current practitioners includes not only those of the photographer, but also of the savvy digital graphic artist.  With the ability to pull details from shadows, augment colors, and combine distinct files into a single image now easier than ever, we must ask—is it acceptable to represent nature without natural characteristics, to merge photos from different focal lengths into one image, or add a blazing sunset to a foreground taken hours or days apart? Can images composed in such a way even be defined as photography and does an ethos, akin to that in photojournalism, apply to nature photography? These are some of the questions we pose to two incredible landscape photographers,  Adam Burton  and  Ryan Dyar. We spoke with them separately, but prepared a similar set of questions, and asked them to walk us through their in-camera workflow and post-process techniques. We spoke about their approach to a scene, their use of “grad-filters” and plug-ins, acceptable degrees of enhancement, and strove to understand if there is indeed an ethics to landscape photography. Guests:  Ryan Dyar and Adam Burton Unprocessed image (left) and post processed image (right) Adam Burton Adam Burton Adam Burton Adam Burton Adam Burton Adam Burton Unprocessed image (left) and post processed image (right) Ryan Dyar Ryan Dyar Ryan Dyar Ryan Dyar Ryan Dyar DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/02/2016
On this week’s episode, we return to our roots—and not just our photographic roots—but we return to our podcast’s original design of chatting about photography among B&H photographers and writers. We welcome back an original co-host of the podcast, Todd Vorenkamp, as we discuss the basics of photography—the control of light through aperture, shutter speed, and ISO sensitivity. Yes, this episode could be considered a Photo 101 course, and for those who are new to photography (or new to manual control of your imaging) this episode should be very helpful. We walk through the core concepts of how to expose your images to get the look you want and try to clarify the sometimes confusing nomenclature and camera settings. We talk depth of field, diffraction, motion blur, digital noise, “Sunny 16,” and the necessary balance between aperture, shutter speed, and ISO that is required for proper exposure. Photo veterans should tune in, too, because our conversation is by photographers for photographers, and will provide insights and anecdotes that may even improve your skills. Guest: Todd Vorenkamp Shallow depth of field can be created by opening up your lens to its maximum aperture.         John Harris High ISO settings enable sharp imaging in low light but can also produce “noise,” apparent in the sky. John Harris Even a shutter speed of less than 1 second can create blur or, in this case, a short light trail.     John Harris Utilizing a 30 second exposure with tripod, low ISO and a small (f/22) aperture, long light trails and intentional blur are created. An auto white balance setting facilitates the proper rendition of the many different color temperatures in this frame. Jason Tables   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/03/2016
The B&H Photography Podcast was very fortunate to be invited to the 29th Eddie Adams Workshop this year. The annual workshop, officially sponsored by Nikon, with support from B&H, is a unique and inspiring event, bringing together 100 young photographers with some of the world’s most recognized photojournalists and editors, including thirteen Pulitzer Prize winners, for four intense days of photographic presentation and collaboration. Tim Rasmussen, Director of Digital and Print Photography at ESPN, joined us for a chat in our improvised studio in the fabled barn on the Eddie Adams farm. Prior to ESPN, Rasmussen was the Assistant Managing Editor of Photography and Multimedia at the Denver Post and under his lead, their photo department earned three Pulitzer Prizes. Tim is also a member of the Board of Directors at the Eddie Adams Workshop and, in addition to having been a team leader, producer and editor at the workshop, he was a student in its very first year—1988. Our conversation with Rasmussen revolves around the workshop—how he came to attend the first-ever workshop, why it has become a breeding ground and “sanctuary” for two generations of talented photojournalists and, of course, around Eddie Adams himself. We also talk with Rasmussen about his own career, transition from photographer to editor, and how he ended up at ESPN. Within this relaxed conversation there is much to learn—about the threads of life and the nature of commitment, about the practice of photojournalism and, particularly for young photographers, about what an editor looks for when hiring a photographer. Photograph above © Tim Rasmussen Guest: Tim Rasmussen Eddie Adams. Photograph by ©Tim Rasmussen The Board of Directors of the Eddie Adams Workshop, 1992. Photo Courtesy Tim Rasmussen The first Black Team at the workshop recreates Joe Rosenthal’s famous Iwo Jima image with Rosenthal in attendance. Photo Courtesy Tim Rasmussen Gregory Heisler at the first ever Eddie Adams Workshop, 1988. Photo courtesy Tim Rasmussen From the 2016 Eddie Adams Workshop Photographer Carol Guzy preparing for her talk at the barn Photographer Adrees Latif with student at 11:30 Club portfolio review Tim Rasmussen editing student’s work Photographer Marco Grob during his talk in the barn Editor Jim Colton offers advice to a student Photographer Nick Ut running for “president” at the 2016 Eddie Adams Workshop Students check out each other’s work at 11:30 Club   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/15/2016
The iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus will be available on September 15, 2016, and we’ve organized an episode to celebrate iPhone photography, including a hands-on review of the new iPhone 7 Plus. Joining us are three photographers who bring unique perspectives to the imaging capabilities of the iPhone. First, we speak with Robin Robertis, a 2016 winner of the iPhone Photography Award and an artist for whom the iPhone provided a new creative tool for her ethereal and vibrant work. Next, we speak with Ed Kashi, a multi-faceted, veteran photojournalist and filmmaker who was one of five photographers assigned by Time magazine to document Hurricane Sandy with just an iPhone. Kashi also teaches workshops in iPhone photography for National Geographic, and will discuss how he incorporates mobile photography into his journalistic work. After a break, we speak with Brendan Ò Sè, a photographer from Cork, Ireland, whose playful image of the curved lines in Copenhagen’s Superkilen Park was chosen for the “Shot on iPhone 6” ad campaign. He'll talk with us about that experience and how the iPhone revived his love for photography. Finally, to put a bow on this episode, we sit with Olivier Laurent, editor of LightBox, at Time.com, to chat about his first impressions of the iPhone 7 Plus. Mr. Laurent was given the latest iPhone 7 before its official announcement to test and review its camera, and he shares his thoughts with us on the new features and specs. Guests: Robin Robertis- 02:00 Ed Kashi- 16:37 Brendan Ò Sè- 37:36 Olivier Laurent- 57:25 (iPhone 7 Review) Photographs above ©  Robin Robertis Photographs above ©  Ed Kashi Photographs above ©  Brendan Ò Sè Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play         Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/21/2016
What will our future selfies be like? Our guest, Stephen Mayes, suggests that they may be images of what we think rather than what we see. For those of you exasperated by the deluge of duck faces in your social media feed, this may be a terrifying idea, but is the selfie really that bad, and if so, how and why is it different than an artist’s self-portrait? These are the questions we address in this week’s episode and, to do so, we have invited the inimitable Mr. Mayes and photographer Nicky Wanzi, whose recent series of self-portraits, in which she depicts not only herself but also two of her best friends, was included in PDN’s 2016 Photo Annual. Join us for this enjoyable conversation as we expose the selfie.   Guests: Nicky Wanzi and Stephen Mayes                   Photos by Nicky Wanzi Nicky Wanzi, Allan Weitz, and Stephen Mayes Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play       b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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