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Posted 07/22/2021
On this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we discuss food photography and ask our two guests to create their vision of the ideal spread for a summer food photography shoot. In the first half of the show, we welcome photographer  Meika Ejiasi, who is a food, lifestyle, and portrait photographer from Oakland, California. With Ejiasi we discuss how she would photograph ice cream and popsicles, as well as about tips and tricks for keeping pizza looking hot after many takes. We talk about utilizing food substitutes, including acrylic ice cubes, about shooting at working restaurants, and about the joys and challenges of getting a call from a big brand. Ejiasi also shares with us hopeful plans for a project dedicated to corn on the cob. Yeah. In the second half of the episode, we speak with photographer Cherry Li, whose work crosses genres and cultures, but always imparts her love for food and photography. We speak about the idea of play with Li when it comes to creativity, whether that be playing with food, with flavors, or with the concepts of food photography via lens and styling decisions. We chat about shooting in kitchens, about power packs vs. speedlites, such as the Godox AD200, and also about monitoring tethered to a computer, or wirelessly, to an iPad. We wrap with a brief chat about Li’s new venture―a new studio and an online photo course dedicated to food photography. Her work really stands out. Join us for this informative episode and check out the articles and videos presented on the B&H Explora blog as we celebrate Food Photography Week. Guests: Meika Ejiasi and Cherry Li Photograph © Meika Ejiasi Photograph © Cherry Li/CherryFoodPhoto Photograph © Cherry Li/CherryFoodPhoto Photograph © Cherry Li/CherryFoodPhoto Photograph © Cherry Li/CherryFoodPhoto From the Skin and Flesh series © Cherry Li/CherryFoodPhoto From the Seafood Fairytales series © Cherry Li/CherryFoodPhoto Photograph © Cherry Li/CherryFoodPhoto Photograph © Meika Ejiasi Photograph © Meika Ejiasi Photograph © Meika Ejiasi Photograph © Meika Ejiasi Photograph © Meika Ejiasi Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 06/17/2021
Is the light in Chicago different than the light in New York? Can “street photography” set the subjects and control the scene? And just how long should you follow people carrying balloons to get a photograph? These are some of the questions we answer in this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. We welcome photographers Nina Welch Kling and Clarissa Bonet  to the program. Kling lives in New York and Bonet in Chicago, although both are from other places entirely. We talk a bit about the differences in each city’s visual makeup and what defines street photography, but we quickly turn toward the styles and workflow of our two guests. With Bonet we discuss how she constructs scenes using the language of street photography to tell internal stories. Her work is large scale, exacting, and utilizes the strong light, deep shadows, and geometries of the urban environment but, as we find out, she produces and casts her medium format photographs to get the exact image she wants, free of the disruption of the hustling crowd and uncooperative elements. We also ask about her incredible nightscape compositions called “Stray Light” and how they evolved to become large, collaged prints. After a break, we focus on the work of Nina Welch Kling and learn how she’s grown to understand the movement of light through the streets of New York. Kling also discusses positioning herself (“corralling”) and holding her camera to get the angles she needs, as well as to communicate her intention to potential subjects. In addition, we mention FUJIFILM cameras and the wide-angle lenses she prefers. We ask about her series “Duologue,” which pairs two photos together, and how that pairing can add or change meaning. We also dig into the classic themes of anonymity, isolation, and wonder in street photography and how quarantine redirected her practice a bit. Join us for this insightful and easygoing conversation. Guests: Clarissa Bonet and Nina Welch Kling Photograph © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling “Glimpse” 2019 © Clarissa Bonet “Gust” 2018 © Clarissa Bonet “Zipper Effect” 2018 © Clarissa Bonet “Curated Landscape” 2019 © Clarissa Bonet “Open” 2020 © Clarissa Bonet “NYC” 2016 © Clarissa Bonet “Miami” 2020 © Clarissa Bonet “Chicago” 2017 © Clarissa Bonet Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 05/27/2021
Not quite three years old, the L-Mount Alliance has already proven successful for its signatory companies—Leica, Sigma, and Panasonic. Built upon the foundation of the Leica L lens mount, the three makers have released a total of nine cameras and a range of lenses, all compatible with each other. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome Marc Farb, Technical Rep from Sigma, John Kreidler, Product Specialist from Leica, and Sean Robinson, Marketing Specialist from Panasonic and host of LUMIX Live, to discuss the beginnings of the L-Mount Alliance, the benefits for each company and for photographers, and to mention some of the latest and favorite cameras and lenses from the partnership. Guests: Sean Robinson, Marc Farb, John Kreidler Leica SL2 Mirrorless Digital Camera Sigma fp L Mirrorless Digital Camera Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H Mirrorless Digital Camera Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG DN Art Lens for Leica L Panasonic Lumix S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 MACRO O.I.S. Lens Leica Vario-Elmarit-SL 24-70mm f/2.8 ASPH. Lens Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 04/08/2021
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome B&H Senior Sales Trainer Kevin Rickert back to the program to discuss the latest cameras and lenses released over the past few months. For today’s episode, we have the support of Audio-Technica and are using its BP40 Large Diaphragm Dynamic Broadcast Microphone. We start with Sony’s new flagship camera, the Alpha A1 Mirrorless Digital Camera, and discuss its impressive features, as well some of the new lenses Sony has introduced, including the Sony FE 50mm f/1.2 GM Lens. We also talk about the new FUJIFILM GFX 100S Medium Format Mirrorless Camera and the FUJIFILM X-E4 Mirrorless Camera. The rest of the episode is dedicated to lenses and a quick look back at some camera releases from late 2020. We mention the incredible new Leica M-mount 35mm f/2 lens and the 28mm f/2 SL lens, a trio of  Pentax  "Limited" lenses, including the tiny 43mm f/1.9 lens, a 15mm Sunstar lens from NiSi, and several others. Cameras from late last year that get a mention are the Nikon Z6 II, the Olympus OM-D E-M10 III, and the Canon PowerShot ZOOM. Join us for this informative chat and start thinking about your spring and summer photography plans! Guest: Kevin Rickert Editor’s Note: Since this podcast was recorded, both Pentax and Sigma have announced new cameras. Both are substantial updates to existing models: Pentax announced the new APS-C flagship Pentax K-3 Mark III DSLR and Sigma introduced the modular fp L Mirrorless Digital Camera. Sony Alpha 1 Mirrorless Digital Camera FUJIFILM GFX 100S Medium Format Mirrorless Camera FUJIFILM X-E4 Mirrorless Digital Camera Sigma fp L Mirrorless Digital Camera Leica APO-Summicron-M 35mm f/2 ASPH. Lens Pentax HD Pentax-FA 43mm f/1.9 Limited NiSi 15mm f/4 Sunstar ASPH Lens Sony FE 50mm f/1.2 GM Lens Sigma 28-70mm f/2.8 DG DN Contemporary Lens Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 12/17/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome photographer Matthew Franklin Carter to the program. Like many photographers, Matt Carter wears a lot of hats. In his case, literally and figuratively, but his photography work blends documentary, editorial, and portrait work and reflects the place he calls home—Greenville, South Carolina. He shoots for regional and specialty magazines and does corporate work and portraits for local artists and businesses. He also assists other photographers and, of course, he has his personal projects. Family, food, fishing, hunting, drag racing, and dirt cars are depicted with humility and grace and a touch of humor. With Carter we discuss a range of topics, but keep our conversation focused on how to work comfortably in varied settings and with different communities of folk. Carter may be at home on the rivers shooting fly fishing, but he also has produced wonderful series at local car-racing tracks, a world with which he is much less familiar. We talk about these two racing projects—“Dirt” and “Glory”—and how he mingles with the drivers and crowd, as well as the gear he uses, from FUJIFILM to Mamiya, to create portraits and documentary-style images. We also discuss photographing hunting and fishing and the portrait work he does, in studio and on location, and the lighting he uses for each situation. We close on the topic of “finding your voice,” and for Carter how his latest project on local food production unites his many passions. Join us for this easygoing and informative conversation. Guest: Matthew Franklin Carter Above photograph © Matthew Franklin Carter From the series “Glory” © Matthew Franklin Carter From the series “Glory” © Matthew Franklin Carter From the series “Glory” © Matthew Franklin Carter From the series “Glory” © Matthew Franklin Carter From the series “Dirt” © Matthew Franklin Carter From the series “Dirt” © Matthew Franklin Carter © Matthew Franklin Carter © Matthew Franklin Carter © Matthew Franklin Carter © Matthew Franklin Carter © Matthew Franklin Carter Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/30/2020
This week on the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome two old friends of the podcast to talk about the latest gear from their respective companies. First up is Rudy Winston, Technical Advisor at Canon USA, and then we welcome Marc Farb, Technical Rep from Sigma. Both Winston and Farb are breaking records with this, their fifth visit to our show. With Rudy Winston, we discuss a few cameras that were released last year or earlier in 2020, such as the Canon EOS 6D Mark II DSLR and the EOS 1D X Mark III DSLR, to get a sense of how they are being received, and then we briefly discuss what may be the most-anticipated camera of 2020, the upcoming EOS R5 Mirrorless Digital Camera. In addition, we talk about the latest Rebel T8i DSLR, CF Express memory cards, and the incredible RF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens. After a short break, we start our conversation with Marc Farb, discussing the impressive Sigma fp Mirrorless Camera, which was announced almost a year ago but has become the latest big deal for those wanting a compact full frame camera that can be the basis of both a complete photo or cine system. From there, we talk lenses. Sigma continues to produce incredible lenses in all categories and for most major camera systems, including the 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Lens for the Sony E system and the just-announced 16mm f/1.4 DC DN and 30mm f/1.4 DC DN for L-mount systems. After a quick mention of Sigma’s adapters and its new UD-11 USB Dock for Leica L-mount lenses, Farb relates an all-time favorite lens of his that is ideal for sports, wedding, and concert photographers, among others: the Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports Lens. Join us for this informative and practical discussion of the most interesting new gear from Canon and Sigma. Guests: Rudy Winston and Marc Farb Canon EOS 6D Mark II DSLR Camera Body with Accessory Kit Canon EOS 1D X Mark III DSLR Camera Canon EOS Rebel T8i DSLR Camera Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens Sigma fp Mirrorless Digital Camera Sigma 16mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary Lens Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG DN OS Contemporary Lens for Sony E-mount Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports Lens Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/26/2018
We welcome back Chris Williams, of Lens Therapy Live, and photographer David Speiser, of lilibirds.com, to the B&H Photography Podcast for a discussion on the applications, techniques, and specific features of super-telephoto lenses. Super-telephoto lenses are most often used by sports and wildlife photographers—however, photojournalists, law-enforcement, and even landscape photographers are known to use them, as well. They offer the build quality to withstand tough conditions and the optical quality to capture distant subjects clearly. For this conversation, we define “super telephoto” as a lens with a six-degree angle of view, which, on a full-frame sensor, corresponds to a 400mm lens. On APS-C format DSLRs you can get an even longer reach with your super telephotos and, while Fujifilm, Olympus, and Panasonic offer a few super teles for their mirrorless cameras, the ultra-long lenses are still the domain of the professional DSLR. There are high-quality super-telephoto zooms from Sigma and Tamron, but our conversation concentrates on the fast-aperture, prime lenses made by Nikon and Canon. We discuss their unique features, image stabilization systems, filters, methods of support, and the techniques used to handle them effectively. Join us for this very informative episode and, while you are at it, subscribe to our show and check out the B&H Photography Podcast: Canon 5D Mark IV Sweepstakes for your chance to win a Canon 5D Mark IV DSLR or a Canon 80D DSLR! Guests: David Speiser and Chris Williams Hermit Thrush Nelson’s Sparrow Northern Hawk Owl Peregrine Falcon Scissor Tailed Flycatcher Gyrfalcon David Speiser, Allan Weitz, and Chris Williams Previous Pause Next David Speiser DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/29/2017
For the B&H Photography Podcast, 2017 has been a wonderful year. We published our 100 th episode, surpassed one million downloads, and reached #1 on the iTunes podcast chart in the Visual Arts category. Achievements aside, we are simply pleased with the remarkable guests we have hosted on our show, the variety of subjects we have covered, and the consistently entertaining and intelligent conversations we have published. And honestly, we are proud to have maintained our production output—week in week out—and to still really enjoy what we do. With this in mind and with gratitude to our listeners, guests, co-workers, and the management at B&H, we have cobbled together a 2017 year-in-review episode in which we discuss our favorite shows from 2017 and play a few clips of the most interesting moments from these episodes. The highlights were many and hard to narrow down, but Allan Weitz chose our episode with photographer Lynn Goldsmith as his favorite, with a close second being our talk with Bellamy Hunt, aka the Japan Camera Hunter. He also mentioned our talks with Richard Drew on his photograph, referred to as “Falling Man,” and our episodes with photojournalists (and husband and wife) Ben Lowy and Marvi Lacar. As for Jason Tables, he pointed to History of Hip-Hop Photography and Night Photography—From Film into Digital, as his favorites. My list included a few of those mentioned above, as well as an episode on social documentary projects and the clip I chose from our serial segment, “Dispatch,” with Adriane Ohanesian, in which she recounts the story of a fatal attack she survived while covering a story in Congo. We discuss several more episodes during this end-of-year extravaganza and hope that the clips pique your interest and inspire you to subscribe to our show and check out programs from our catalog, which now includes more than 100 episodes. Thank you and happy New Year from Allan, Jason, and John. Guests: Lynn Goldsmith, Bellamy Hunt, Richard Drew, Ben Lowy, Marvi Lacar, Danny Hastings, Eric Johnson, Janette Beckman, Vicky Tobak, Chris Nicholson, Lance Keimig, Adriane Ohanesian   Jason Tables, Allan Weitz, and John Harris   Jolene Lupo, Penumbra Foundation DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/20/2017
We are living in a Golden Age of landscape photography. Digital cameras and improved software enable the kind of imaging that until recently was only possible via the budgets of large publications and the talents and ambitions of a few select photographers. Ambition and talent remain, and with enhanced dynamic range and color algorithms, higher sensitivity settings, simplified stitching and compositing software, and a network of websites to display work, impressive landscape photography is abundant; however,  there are new masters and the skill set of current practitioners includes not only those of the photographer, but also of the savvy digital graphic artist.  With the ability to pull details from shadows, augment colors, and combine distinct files into a single image now easier than ever, we must ask—is it acceptable to represent nature without natural characteristics, to merge photos from different focal lengths into one image, or add a blazing sunset to a foreground taken hours or days apart? Can images composed in such a way even be defined as photography and does an ethos, akin to that in photojournalism, apply to nature photography? These are some of the questions we pose to two incredible landscape photographers,  Adam Burton  and  Ryan Dyar. We spoke with them separately, but prepared a similar set of questions, and asked them to walk us through their in-camera workflow and post-process techniques. We spoke about their approach to a scene, their use of “grad-filters” and plug-ins, acceptable degrees of enhancement, and strove to understand if there is indeed an ethics to landscape photography. Guests:  Ryan Dyar and Adam Burton Unprocessed image (left) and post processed image (right) Adam Burton Adam Burton Adam Burton Adam Burton Adam Burton Adam Burton Unprocessed image (left) and post processed image (right) Ryan Dyar Ryan Dyar Ryan Dyar Ryan Dyar Ryan Dyar DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/02/2016
On this week’s episode, we return to our roots—and not just our photographic roots—but we return to our podcast’s original design of chatting about photography among B&H photographers and writers. We welcome back an original co-host of the podcast, Todd Vorenkamp, as we discuss the basics of photography—the control of light through aperture, shutter speed, and ISO sensitivity. Yes, this episode could be considered a Photo 101 course, and for those who are new to photography (or new to manual control of your imaging) this episode should be very helpful. We walk through the core concepts of how to expose your images to get the look you want and try to clarify the sometimes confusing nomenclature and camera settings. We talk depth of field, diffraction, motion blur, digital noise, “Sunny 16,” and the necessary balance between aperture, shutter speed, and ISO that is required for proper exposure. Photo veterans should tune in, too, because our conversation is by photographers for photographers, and will provide insights and anecdotes that may even improve your skills. Guest: Todd Vorenkamp Shallow depth of field can be created by opening up your lens to its maximum aperture.         John Harris High ISO settings enable sharp imaging in low light but can also produce “noise,” apparent in the sky. John Harris Even a shutter speed of less than 1 second can create blur or, in this case, a short light trail.     John Harris Utilizing a 30 second exposure with tripod, low ISO and a small (f/22) aperture, long light trails and intentional blur are created. An auto white balance setting facilitates the proper rendition of the many different color temperatures in this frame. Jason Tables   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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