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Posted 11/09/2021
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we are pleased to welcome Peter Cohen and Bill Shapiro to discuss “vernacular” photography and the historical and cultural significance of snapshots and other images that fall outside the realms of fine-art and commercial photography. Peter J. Cohen is recognized as one of the country’s foremost collectors of vernacular photography and portions of his collections are now included in institutions such as Metropolitan Museum of Art, MoMA, MFA Boston, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Morgan Library, and SFMoMA. Bill Shapiro is the former Editor-in-Chief of LIFE Magazine and the founding Editor-in-Chief of LIFE.com. He is the author of several books, including Gus & Me, a children’s book he co-wrote with Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards, and What We Keep, from 2018. Shapiro is also a curator and has written about photography for The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, Esquire, and others, including an article for Texas Monthly, which contains images referred to in this episode. With our guests we discuss the joy of collecting old photos, of discovering themes, creating romantic stories, and of the beauty of the photograph as object. We also consider the surge of interest in vernacular photography from museums and other institutions, the marketplace distinctions among these and fine-art photos, and most important, what these images can tell us about our country and cultures. Join us for this enjoyable and insightful conversation. Guests: Peter Cohen and Bill Shapiro Photograph Courtesy of the Peter J. Cohen Collection Photograph Courtesy of the Collection of Bill Shapiro Photograph Courtesy of the Collection of Bill Shapiro Photograph Courtesy of the Collection of Bill Shapiro Photograph Courtesy of the Collection of Bill Shapiro Photograph Courtesy of the Collection of Bill Shapiro Photograph Courtesy of the Collection of Bill Shapiro “A Trip to the Moon,” Photograph Courtesy of the Peter J. Cohen Collection “Bottoms Up,” Photograph Courtesy of the Peter J. Cohen Collection “Girls at the Farm,” Photograph Courtesy of the Peter J. Cohen Collection “Me at the Beach,” Photograph Courtesy of the Peter J. Cohen Collection “Roof Couple,” Photograph Courtesy of the Peter J. Cohen Collection “Sheep from the Car,” Photograph Courtesy of the Peter J. Cohen Collection “A Dangerous Woman Amongst Men,” Photograph Courtesy of the Peter J. Cohen Collection Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 09/30/2021
This week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is a wonderful way to usher in autumn, and we hope it inspires our listeners to get out into the forests, fields, and streams to photograph what they love. It is also an episode that hits all the marks, as we talk about the gear, technique, science, ethics, and passion of photography―in this case, centered on fly-fishing photography. Our guests, Jess McGlothlin and Toby Nolan, bring all of the above, and a ton of experience, as we flow like a river through this hour-long conversation. Jess McGlothlin is based in Missoula, Montana, but has photographed from the Arctic Circle to the Peruvian Amazon. Her storytelling approach, often coupled with her own writing, has found a home in a range of genres and formats, from commercial to documentary. Her credit list includes brands like Patagonia and YETI Coolers and publications such as Field & Stream, The New York Times, Men's Journal, and Southern Culture on the Fly. Toby Nolan was born in Dublin, Ireland, bases his fishing and outdoor sports photography in Bend, Oregon, and travels the globe for assignments. His editorial work can be found in The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, The FlyFish Journal, and The Drake Magazine. His commercial clients include Under Armour, Ironman Triathlons, and Travel Nevada. Did you know that Billingham camera bags developed from bags made for anglers? And today’s talk runs the gamut, discussing the unique aspects of fly-fishing photography, and a diverse set of tools from brands like Canon, AquaTech, and DJI. Guests: Toby Nolan and Jess McGlothlin Photograph © Toby Nolan © Toby Nolan © Toby Nolan © Toby Nolan © Toby Nolan © Toby Nolan © Jess McGlothlin © Jess McGlothlin © Jess McGlothlin © Jess McGlothlin © Jess McGlothlin Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 05/13/2021
This week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is an old-fashioned hands-on review, but in this case, made with six hands. Allan, Jason, and I were pleased to be loaned the Leica Q2 Digital Camera and the Leica Q2 Monochrom Digital Camera, and we use our consideration of these 47MP cameras as a springboard to talk about camera grips, and point-and-shoot cameras, and value. We also talk about macro photography and cropping and about how to create black-and-white images from color files. We begin the conversation mentioning the specs and features of these two incredible cameras and each of us offers our pros and cons regarding the features we liked best and those we felt lacking. Autofocus, body design, focal length, and responsiveness are mentioned. Other Leica cameras, such as the Leica M10-P, get discussed, too, as do the practical differences between rangefinders with removable lenses and point-and-shoots. Join us for this casual chat about photography and about how each of us, with our different workflows, aesthetics, and goals, found these cameras to be versatile, yet also challenged us to create better images. Guests: Allan Weitz, Jason Tables, John Harris Photograph © John Harris © Jason Tables © Jason Tables © Jason Tables © John Harris © John Harris © John Harris Leica Q2 Monochrom Digital Camera © John Harris © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz © Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 04/01/2021
This episode was first published in January 2018. The Canon sweepstakes mentioned in the episode has long since ended and is no longer valid. For some photographers, the phrase “run and gun” has a negative connotation, but when you’re Norman Reedus, that description takes on a much cooler meaning, one that is accurate to his style and a compliment to his ability to “sense a moment.” Reedus, most recognized for his acting work on the television series, “The Walking Dead” and “Ride with Norman Reedus,” is first and always an artist: a sculptor, a director, and author of the photography books, “The Sun’s Coming Up… Like a Big Bald Head” and his latest, “Portraits from the Woods,” which is a behind-the-scenes glimpse at the making of “The Walking Dead.” Both books are available at Big Bald Gallery. With the travel demands of working on films and television, Reedus’s photography becomes a way to engage with his locations and document his adventures but, through the eyes of an artist, his work is more than just famous locales and behind-the-scenes fun. He brings a personal vision, humorous and dark, to images he captures and does so with an experimenter’s touch, using a variety of cameras and styles. We talk with Reedus about his start in photography, his stylistic approaches, gear choices, and what he has learned from his time in front of a camera that helps with his work behind one. However, with a guest like Reedus—generous with his time and tales—you let the conversation flow, and we also discuss his series “Ride,” the influence of Laurie Anderson, fan selfies, his love of horror films, and a range of other topics. While recording this episode, the Tom Waits line, “I like beautiful melodies telling me terrible things,” kept popping into my head. I’m not sure this line best reflects Reedus’s work, but I am sure there is a Tom Waits line that does. This episode was a real treat for us at the B&H Photography Podcast, and we hope you feel the same in the listening. Allan Weitz and Norman Reedus, 2017 © John Harris Guest: Norman Reedus Photograph © Norman Reedus Cooks in the Kitchen with Kitten, Max Security Prison, Moscow © Norman Reedus Exercise, Max Security Prison, Moscow © Norman Reedus Tulum 2 © Norman Reedus Undecided Soldier © Norman Reedus San Diego © Norman Reedus Cover from “Portraits from the Woods,” 2020 © Norman Reedus Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 03/04/2021
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome wedding and portrait photographer Kesha Lambert. We are excited to speak with Lambert about her approach to wedding photography on today’s show, but she is also speaking at the upcoming 4th annual Depth of Field Portrait, Wedding, and Event Photography Conference, which is a free virtual event to be held on March 7 – 8, 2021. The conference is hosted by B&H Photo and sponsored by Sony, Nikon, Canon, Godox, HP/NVIDIA, and others. The work of Kesha Lambert stands out for its ability to be both joyous and intimate. She deftly uses color and composition, as well as experience and intuition to tell unique and universal wedding day stories. Did I mention that Lambert is also a lawyer, mom to three boys, a member of the Wedding Photojournalist Association, and a Sony Artisan of Imagery? In our conversation, we discuss her business, intrapersonal, and photography skills to get a sense of how she runs her successful studio. Her website is a lesson in design and good business practices, and we discuss cameras and lenses, getting ahead of client expectations, contracts, and subjects as diverse as lighting kits and keeping large wedding parties focused and in frame. Join us for this insightful and enjoyable chat and register for Depth of Field 2021. Guest: Kesha Lambert Photograph © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert © Kesha Lambert Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 11/05/2020
Our guest on this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is Sam Hurd. While he is primarily a wedding photographer, I have no doubt that he could photograph anything and make it look interesting. Hurd is also a portrait photographer, he dabbles in landscape work, and is a passionate photo educator. A few minutes listening to this episode and it becomes clear that he can articulate his process as well as he can execute it. He offers “deconstructions” of his images for his Patreon followers and teaches his style, technique, and gear, but today we focus on his “side hustles,” on the methods and platforms he uses to engage with clients and make extra money from the wedding photography he is already doing. We start by discussing his Patreon platform and how he uses his wedding photography images and insights to build a following of “patrons,” who pay monthly subscriptions to follow his tutorials. We then jump to Stocksy, and how his well-curated set of stock images, mostly taken at weddings, creates an additional revenue flow. He also speaks of DVLOP, which is a site that markets presets that he has created while processing his wedding work. Of course, each of these ancillary platforms flows into and out of each other not only to gain him clients but to improve his photography. He mentions several times how the challenge of producing interesting tutorials has forced him to be more inventive. Despite a very simple kit when shooting weddings, Hurd is also a self-described gearhead, and he and Allan bond over their love for vintage glass and discuss recent purchases, including the Hasselblad 907X 50C  and the Canon R6. Finally, we touch on Hurd’s first professional gig, as the staff photographer for the National Press Club, some of the famous faces he photographed, and the odd but practical practice techniques he developed to practice his portraiture. Join us for this very informative episode. Guest: Sam Hurd Photograph © Sam Hurd © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography George Clooney at the National Press Club © Sam Hurd Photography Mariska Hargitay at the National Press Club © Sam Hurd Photography Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/21/2020
We present a fun and insightful conversation on this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, perhaps due to the Midwestern charm of photographer Julie Blackmon and the enjoyable discussion of her wonderful tableaux vivants of family life in middle America. We also welcome back to the show gallery owner Robert Mann, who is currently hosting an exhibit of Blackmon’s photographs titled Talent Show. Mann was a guest on our show, in 2018, when we spoke about the work of Australian photographer Murray Fredericks. The medium format compositions of Julie Blackmon infuse innocent playtime with a creeping sense of danger to create works with a wonderful dark humor. There is also a welcome DIY spirit to her work, and we talk about the creation of her photos and the involvement of her own family and friends in the images; even photos that have up to twenty-five subjects are produced and organized with her sisters and fellow parents.  She is hands-on in all aspects of the work, including making the large prints herself. We also talk about her use of the Hasselblad H system and how she combines wide angle and normal perspectives in her detailed final prints. After a break, Robert Mann takes the lion’s share of the questions as we discuss the many challenges faced by photography galleries. In addition to the expense of a brick and mortar gallery and the proliferation of online viewing and sales, the COVID-19 pandemic has forever changed the idea of a public art gallery.  Mann relates the decision to close his Chelsea gallery and receive collectors on a by-appointment basis, as well as his thoughts on creating editions and limiting prints and the general state of the fine art photo market. Join us for this enlightening four-way conversation as we gain insight from the perspective of the artist and the gallerist. Guests: Julie Blackmon and Robert Mann Photograph © Julie Blackmon River, 2020 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Baby Toss, 2009 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Stock Tank, 2012 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Talent Show, 2019 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Outing, 2019 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Spray Paint, 2020 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/18/2019
The B&H Photography Podcast wraps up 2019 expanding our minds, with the help of Swedish photographer Erik Johansson. Enabling his playful and slightly sinister imagination with a wealth of design and photographic talent, Johannsson makes images that toy with the veracity of a photo while using relatively basic photographic processes to create them. It is certainly worth viewing Johansson’s website or Instagram feed before (or while) listening to this episode to familiarize yourselves with the images we discuss and to gain a sense of his mastery of scale and narrative. Combining landscape photography, staged scenes with actors, oversized props, and the best of digital collage, Johansson creates images that seem to emanate directly from his dreamy imagination, but are undoubtedly the product of much real-world work, and he kindly takes the time to explain his process and workflow to us. A woman emerges from a shopping mall escalator to find herself in a dark forest, a man pulls a lonely country road across a field like a bed sheet, a house is tossed as verdant farmland turns into a violent tidal wave. These scenes, along with many others (and some with a decidedly MC Escher feel), have us wondering, “how does he do it?” Join us for our conversation with Johansson to find out the tools he uses (starting with his Hasselblad camera system) and the amount of time and production it takes to create each of these surrealistic vignettes. As we celebrate our 200th episode, chime in on our Facebook group with your all-time favorite episode or let us know a subject you’d like us to cover in 2020. Thanks! And have a great New Year. Guest: Erik Johansson Above photograph © Erik Johansson Above All, 2019 © Erik Johansson Just Visiting, 2019 © Erik Johansson Self-Supporting, 2017 © Erik Johansson Lifetime, 2017 © Erik Johansson Road Closed Unexpectedly, 2019 © Erik Johansson Office Escape, 2019 © Erik Johansson The Cover-Up, 2013 © Erik Johansson Let’s Leave, 2013 © Erik Johansson Daybreaker, 2018 © Erik Johansson Demand & Supply, 2017 © Erik Johansson Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/10/2019
It’s that time of year again at the B&H Photography Podcast. Now firmly established as a tradition, with the end of the year in sight and gifting season in full swing, we take an episode to talk about the most interesting—dare I say, best—cameras of the year. Our guests include podcast regular Levi Tenenbaum and B&H SuperStore camera expert Georgina Diaz. This year, we start with an overview of mirrorless cameras announced in 2019, including the new full-frames from Panasonic, Sony, Leica and Sigma. We also mention the new APS-C and Micro Four Thirds format cameras such as the FUJIFILM X-Pro 3, the Sony Alpha a6600, the Nikon Z50, and the Olympus OM-D E-M1X Mirrorless Digital Camera. Perhaps most interesting are the mirrorless medium format high-resolution cameras that were introduced, including the FUJIFILM GFX 100 and Hasselblad X1D II 50C. Jumping ahead to DSLR cameras, we see that Nikon and Canon updated their flagship models, Canon offering the EOS-1D X Mark II DSLR and Nikon, the D6 DSLR Camera. Canon also announced its compact mirrorless full frame, the Canon EOS RP. High-end point-and-shoots from Sony and Canon were released, as were three new waterproof tough cameras from Ricoh, FUJIFILM, and Olympus. After a break, we take on the subject of lenses and accessories and highlight a few lenses that caught our attention, such as the FUJIFILM XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR, the Sony FE 200-600mm f/5.6-6.3 G OSS, the Nikon NIKKOR Z 58mm f/0.95 S Noct lens, and several others. We wrap up the episode with a discussion of lights, tripods, drones, and other accessories. Our guests bring their expertise to this conversation as we compare new cameras to their predecessors, discuss specs, and get insight from the SuperStore floor regarding what have been the hot items from 2019. Join us for this timely and educational episode. Guests:  Georgina Diaz and Levi Tenenbaum   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/31/2019
This week, we welcome two photographers who know the joys of spending a late afternoon waiting for super cells to form, or that perfect lightning strike to appear, as well as the perils of rising waters, golf-ball-sized hail, and projectile debris in flight. Our topic today is extreme-weather photography, and we welcome photographers from two different continents to tell us about their shooting styles, safety precautions, gear, and their general thoughts on weather, social media, and the photography business. We are joined first by photographer and filmmaker Jim Reed, who is a represented by National Geographic Image Collection. His work has been published in National Geographic magazine, the New York Times, Scientific American, and The Guardian, and has been featured on the Weather Channel, Discovery Network, and the Oprah show. He is the author of the critically acclaimed 2007 photo book, “Storm Chaser: A Photographer's Journey.” With Reed, we discuss his minimal gear setup, safety precautions, useful apps, and how his client base has shifted during his thirty-year career. After a short break, we welcome Jordan Cantelo, from the Western Australian town of Jurien Bay. Cantelo is a local wildfire officer who began photographing weather during long stints in the bush. With Cantelo, we speak about the specific weather and storm types in Western Australia, his use of lightning triggers, his preference for medium format cameras, landscape compositions, and how he follows weather systems to get the shots he is after. For many photographers, being a “storm chaser” seems like a thrilling way to earn a living, so tune in to the B&H Photography Podcast for our conversation with two seasoned weather and landscape photographers to get a better understanding of the dos, the don’ts, and the practical side of extreme-weather photography. Guests: Jim Reed and Jordan Cantelo Above photograph © Jim Reed Professional storm chasers monitor an approaching tornado in western Kansas on May 8, 2008 © Jim Reed Concurrent Tornadoes at Night, 2012 © Jim Reed A Bolt from the Gray, 2004 © Jim Reed A severe thunderstorm brings much needed rain to a drought-stricken farm near Roswell, New Mexico, 2013. © Jim Reed Cloud-to-ground lightning bolts strike a field in eastern Wyoming, 2011. © Jim Reed Waves explode over a seawall and into Galveston, Texas as Hurricane Ike approaches, on September 12, 2008. © Jim Reed Ominous Skies © Jordan Cantelo Dowerin Evening Lightning © Jordan Cantelo Microburst- Between Beacon and Wialki © Jordan Cantelo Electric Skies – Beacon © Jordan Cantelo Kimberley Wet Season Skies © Jordan Cantelo Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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