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Posted 06/17/2021
Is the light in Chicago different than the light in New York? Can “street photography” set the subjects and control the scene? And just how long should you follow people carrying balloons to get a photograph? These are some of the questions we answer in this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. We welcome photographers Nina Welch Kling and Clarissa Bonet  to the program. Kling lives in New York and Bonet in Chicago, although both are from other places entirely. We talk a bit about the differences in each city’s visual makeup and what defines street photography, but we quickly turn toward the styles and workflow of our two guests. With Bonet we discuss how she constructs scenes using the language of street photography to tell internal stories. Her work is large scale, exacting, and utilizes the strong light, deep shadows, and geometries of the urban environment but, as we find out, she produces and casts her medium format photographs to get the exact image she wants, free of the disruption of the hustling crowd and uncooperative elements. We also ask about her incredible nightscape compositions called “Stray Light” and how they evolved to become large, collaged prints. After a break, we focus on the work of Nina Welch Kling and learn how she’s grown to understand the movement of light through the streets of New York. Kling also discusses positioning herself (“corralling”) and holding her camera to get the angles she needs, as well as to communicate her intention to potential subjects. In addition, we mention FUJIFILM cameras and the wide-angle lenses she prefers. We ask about her series “Duologue,” which pairs two photos together, and how that pairing can add or change meaning. We also dig into the classic themes of anonymity, isolation, and wonder in street photography and how quarantine redirected her practice a bit. Join us for this insightful and easygoing conversation. Guests: Clarissa Bonet and Nina Welch Kling Photograph © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling © Nina Welch Kling “Glimpse” 2019 © Clarissa Bonet “Gust” 2018 © Clarissa Bonet “Zipper Effect” 2018 © Clarissa Bonet “Curated Landscape” 2019 © Clarissa Bonet “Open” 2020 © Clarissa Bonet “NYC” 2016 © Clarissa Bonet “Miami” 2020 © Clarissa Bonet “Chicago” 2017 © Clarissa Bonet Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 06/10/2021
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we take a deep dive into the technical, legal, and even theoretical topics surrounding Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) and their growing place in the art and photography worlds. To take on this subject, we welcome cryptocurrency expert and past guest of the show, Drew Hinkes. Hinkes is an attorney and professor and, in 2017, was nominated as one of Coindesk’s Most Influential People in Blockchain. He is also co-founder and General Counsel of Athena Blockchain, a firm focused on tokenized investment products. We also welcome Derek Paul Jack Boyle and Mitra Saboury, who together make up the art collaborative Meatwreck. Meatwreck has recently minted and sold NFTs associated with its art and we ask Boyle and Saboury how the process worked and their general thoughts on NFTs in relation to community and their art work. In addition to clearing some of the murky waters surrounding NFTs, cryptocurrency, and smart contracts, this episode discusses the future of intellectual property and how the blockchain is changing the way we value, store, resell, and protect our copyrighted images. Join us for this in-depth and informative conversation. Guests: Drew Hinkes, Derek Paul Jack Boyle, Mitra Saboury Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 04/01/2021
This episode was first published in January 2018. The Canon sweepstakes mentioned in the episode has long since ended and is no longer valid. For some photographers, the phrase “run and gun” has a negative connotation, but when you’re Norman Reedus, that description takes on a much cooler meaning, one that is accurate to his style and a compliment to his ability to “sense a moment.” Reedus, most recognized for his acting work on the television series, “The Walking Dead” and “Ride with Norman Reedus,” is first and always an artist: a sculptor, a director, and author of the photography books, “The Sun’s Coming Up… Like a Big Bald Head” and his latest, “Portraits from the Woods,” which is a behind-the-scenes glimpse at the making of “The Walking Dead.” Both books are available at Big Bald Gallery. With the travel demands of working on films and television, Reedus’s photography becomes a way to engage with his locations and document his adventures but, through the eyes of an artist, his work is more than just famous locales and behind-the-scenes fun. He brings a personal vision, humorous and dark, to images he captures and does so with an experimenter’s touch, using a variety of cameras and styles. We talk with Reedus about his start in photography, his stylistic approaches, gear choices, and what he has learned from his time in front of a camera that helps with his work behind one. However, with a guest like Reedus—generous with his time and tales—you let the conversation flow, and we also discuss his series “Ride,” the influence of Laurie Anderson, fan selfies, his love of horror films, and a range of other topics. While recording this episode, the Tom Waits line, “I like beautiful melodies telling me terrible things,” kept popping into my head. I’m not sure this line best reflects Reedus’s work, but I am sure there is a Tom Waits line that does. This episode was a real treat for us at the B&H Photography Podcast, and we hope you feel the same in the listening. Allan Weitz and Norman Reedus, 2017 © John Harris Guest: Norman Reedus Photograph © Norman Reedus Cooks in the Kitchen with Kitten, Max Security Prison, Moscow © Norman Reedus Exercise, Max Security Prison, Moscow © Norman Reedus Tulum 2 © Norman Reedus Undecided Soldier © Norman Reedus San Diego © Norman Reedus Cover from “Portraits from the Woods,” 2020 © Norman Reedus Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Shawn C Steiner
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Posted 02/04/2021
It’s hard to imagine a more ideal guest for a photography podcast than the wonderful Ralph Gibson. Gibson checks all the boxes—a straight-up master of the medium, a man of insights and tales, with a comprehensive understanding of photography from the nuts and bolts to the conceptual rigors. After training in the Navy, he assisted the great Dorothea Lange in the darkroom, but found his calling as an artist, staying true to his voice, and founding a publishing house for his seminal photo book, The Somnambulist, and those of many other artists, including Larry Clark, Mary Ellen Mark, and Duane Michals. On this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Gibson about Robert Frank and Dorothea Lange, about establishing a visual signature, “broken focus,” and of course, about his trusty Leica systems. We also touch on his relationship with musician and artist Lou Reed, 50mm versus 75mm lenses, deconstructing the tropes of photography, and the connections between music and photography. This was a conversation we wished could have continued for hours, and we suggest you consider one of Gibson’s bookmaking workshops or simply dig into his incredible body of work, perhaps starting with his latest book, Sacred Land: Israel Before and After Time. Join us for this wide-ranging and inspiring conversation, and as Gibson states, “I always believed that if I stayed true to my work, everything else would fall into place.” Guest: Ralph Gibson Photograph © Ralph Gibson From “The Somnambulist” © Ralph Gibson From “The Somnambulist” © Ralph Gibson “Elbow” © Ralph Gibson From “San Francisco” © Ralph Gibson “Self-portrait in VW, 1963” © Ralph Gibson Cover of “Sacred Land” © Ralph Gibson From “Sacred Land” © Ralph Gibson From “Sacred Land” © Ralph Gibson From “Sacred Land” © Ralph Gibson From “Sacred Land” © Ralph Gibson Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/05/2020
Our guest on this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is Sam Hurd. While he is primarily a wedding photographer, I have no doubt that he could photograph anything and make it look interesting. Hurd is also a portrait photographer, he dabbles in landscape work, and is a passionate photo educator. A few minutes listening to this episode and it becomes clear that he can articulate his process as well as he can execute it. He offers “deconstructions” of his images for his Patreon followers and teaches his style, technique, and gear, but today we focus on his “side hustles,” on the methods and platforms he uses to engage with clients and make extra money from the wedding photography he is already doing. We start by discussing his Patreon platform and how he uses his wedding photography images and insights to build a following of “patrons,” who pay monthly subscriptions to follow his tutorials. We then jump to Stocksy, and how his well-curated set of stock images, mostly taken at weddings, creates an additional revenue flow. He also speaks of DVLOP, which is a site that markets presets that he has created while processing his wedding work. Of course, each of these ancillary platforms flows into and out of each other not only to gain him clients but to improve his photography. He mentions several times how the challenge of producing interesting tutorials has forced him to be more inventive. Despite a very simple kit when shooting weddings, Hurd is also a self-described gearhead, and he and Allan bond over their love for vintage glass and discuss recent purchases, including the Hasselblad 907X 50C  and the Canon R6. Finally, we touch on Hurd’s first professional gig, as the staff photographer for the National Press Club, some of the famous faces he photographed, and the odd but practical practice techniques he developed to practice his portraiture. Join us for this very informative episode. Guest: Sam Hurd Photograph © Sam Hurd © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography © Sam Hurd Photography George Clooney at the National Press Club © Sam Hurd Photography Mariska Hargitay at the National Press Club © Sam Hurd Photography Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/12/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome collector, curator, author, and educator W.M. Hunt. Part of the incredible photography collection Hunt has acquired over the years is being auctioned by the famed Christies auction house, and Hunt joins us to chat about the genesis of his collection, that hard-to-define attraction to an image that inspires a purchase, and his hopes for the current sale. The collection that Hunt is selling is called “The Unseen Eye: Photos from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” and it includes photographs by Richard Avedon, Sally Mann, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Robert Mapplethorpe, Henri Cartier-Bresson—a veritable Who’s Who of photography of the 19th and 20th centuries. The collection was given its name because each of the photos has subjects whose eyes are obscured in some way, and we discuss why Hunt decided to collect such an eclectic group of images. Hunt is also an author and educator, and we discuss the numerous monographs he has written, how to “let a picture find you,” and the visceral difference between a good and a great photograph. Join us for this insightful and fun episode. Guest: W.M. Hunt Photograph © Duane Michals, from “The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” Courtesy of W.M. Hunt and Christies America © Duane Michals, from the “The Unseen Eye: Photos from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” Courtesy Christies America Diane Arbus, from the “The Unseen Eye: Photos from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” Courtesy Christies America Richard Avedon, from the “The Unseen Eye: Photos from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” Courtesy Christies America Henri Cartier-Bresson, from the “The Unseen Eye: Photos from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” Courtesy Christies America Sally Mann, from the “The Unseen Eye: Photos from the W.M. Hunt Collection,” Courtesy Christies America Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/16/2020
As museums in New York and around the world begin to reopen in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, a brand-new museum is facing the challenge of its grand reopening in the competitive New York City art and culture world. We welcome the inaugural Director of Exhibitions of Fotografiska, Amanda Hajjar, to the B&H Photography Podcast to discuss the unique model of this for-profit arts center and its plans to make a mark on the photography scene in New York. After opening, in December 2019, Fotografiska New York was forced to close after just ninety days and, of course, we will also ask Hajjar how they handled the quarantine disruption and are adjusting to the new protocols placed on museums. Fotografiska New York is the third of three like-named museums, with more scheduled to open around the world. The original began in Stockholm, Sweden, in 2010, and adopted a different paradigm than the traditional museum—it displays a wide range of photography styles, it has no permanent collection, and it works with the artists themselves to design the exhibitions. It also relies on admission sales, as well as café, restaurant, and special event business to generate income. It created much buzz in the months before opening in New York, and its initial reviews were positive, for its events and photo exhibition programming. We speak with Hajjar about the museum’s exhibition philosophy and how its model facilitates an institution able to react to and comment on current social issues, as well as examine relevant images from the past. We discuss its attempt to create a hybrid between gallery and museum and shine a light on its current exhibitions, including works by Cooper & Gorfer and by Martin Schoeller. Finally, we get to the bottom of what the word Fotografiska really means. Join us for this enjoyable conversation. Guest: Amanda Hajjar Photograph courtesy Fotografiska Israa With Yellow Boxes, 2020 © Cooper & Gorfer Yellow Roseline, 2020 © Cooper & Gorfer Gary Drinkhard, 2019, video and sound installation © Martin Schoeller Kwame Ajamu, 2019, video and sound installation. © Martin Schoeller Ezra, 2019 © Julie Blackmon. Courtesy the artist and Robert Mann Gallery The Shan Hai Jing Hotel Room 002, 2019 © Zhongjia Sun Untitled, 2019 © Cristina Bartley Dominguez The Church Mission Building, 2019. Courtesy Fotografiska Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/21/2020
We present a fun and insightful conversation on this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, perhaps due to the Midwestern charm of photographer Julie Blackmon and the enjoyable discussion of her wonderful tableaux vivants of family life in middle America. We also welcome back to the show gallery owner Robert Mann, who is currently hosting an exhibit of Blackmon’s photographs titled Talent Show. Mann was a guest on our show, in 2018, when we spoke about the work of Australian photographer Murray Fredericks. The medium format compositions of Julie Blackmon infuse innocent playtime with a creeping sense of danger to create works with a wonderful dark humor. There is also a welcome DIY spirit to her work, and we talk about the creation of her photos and the involvement of her own family and friends in the images; even photos that have up to twenty-five subjects are produced and organized with her sisters and fellow parents.  She is hands-on in all aspects of the work, including making the large prints herself. We also talk about her use of the Hasselblad H system and how she combines wide angle and normal perspectives in her detailed final prints. After a break, Robert Mann takes the lion’s share of the questions as we discuss the many challenges faced by photography galleries. In addition to the expense of a brick and mortar gallery and the proliferation of online viewing and sales, the COVID-19 pandemic has forever changed the idea of a public art gallery.  Mann relates the decision to close his Chelsea gallery and receive collectors on a by-appointment basis, as well as his thoughts on creating editions and limiting prints and the general state of the fine art photo market. Join us for this enlightening four-way conversation as we gain insight from the perspective of the artist and the gallerist. Guests: Julie Blackmon and Robert Mann Photograph © Julie Blackmon River, 2020 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Baby Toss, 2009 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Stock Tank, 2012 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Talent Show, 2019 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Outing, 2019 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Spray Paint, 2020 © Julie Blackmon, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/17/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome Margit Erb and Michael Parillo, of the Saul Leiter Foundation, to discuss Saul Leiter’s career and their work preserving the art and the legacy of this pioneer of color photography. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Leiter veered from the traditional religious path his parents desired for him and moved to New York City to follow his own calling. Met with early success in the 1950s—Leiter’s photography was included in exhibits at MoMA and he built a steady career as a fashion photographer for Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar —by the 1980s, he was forced to give up his studio and struggled financially, but late in life his huge archive of color street photography, much of which was unseen beyond a few curators and colleagues, became a treasure chest of fine art photography. A painter and photographer, he left behind a tremendous amount of work, including hundreds of rolls of unprocessed film, that has been entrusted to Erb and the Leiter Foundation. We talk with Erb and Parillo about Leiter’s early life, his growth as a photographer, his shooting style, his work in fashion, and even how he turned down an invitation to be included in the legendary “Family of Man” exhibition at MoMA. After a break, we discuss the nuts and bolts of organizing and maintaining an archive that is at once massive and unwieldy and a never-ending source of inspiration. Join us for this fascinating conversation about a photographer whose complete body of work is yet to be fully appreciated. Guests: Margit Erb and Michael Parillo Photograph © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery Sunday Morning at the Cloisters, 1947 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Five and Dime, 1950 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery From Harper’s Bazaar, February, 1959 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Mirrors, 1962 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Red Curtain, 1956 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Red Umbrella, 1955 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Haircut, 1956 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Snow, 1970 © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Untitled, 1950s © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Self-portrait, 1950s © Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/12/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome intellectual property attorney David Deal back to the program to discuss issues regarding copyright infringement, particularly as they involve three high-profile cases in which he is involved. Deal spoke with us last year about a case he had just litigated, Brammer vs Violent Hues Productions, in which he successfully argued to reverse a lower court’s decision, thus protecting his client’s photograph from copyright infringement. While it was a relatively small case, the decision carried positive ramifications for photographers and should stand as precedent going forward. Deal provides a summary of why that case is so important to photographers. He also brings us up to speed on a high-profile case in which he represents many possible heirs to the copyright of Vivian Maier’s photo catalogue. On the second half of our show, we will speak with Deal about the current case in which he is involved, regarding the estate of noted rural portrait photographer Mike Disfarmer  1884–1959). This conversation will serve as an introduction to a serial segment we will record with David Deal over the coming months about the Disfarmer images. Disfarmer’s work is well known and sought after in the art world, but the question remains as to who are the rightful heirs of his work and whether they have been properly compensated. Because his images have been reproduced and sold for many years by various vendors, the case is complicated, and Deal walks us through the issues surrounding this fascinating photographer and case, which involves heroes and villains from small-town Arkansas to big-city New York. Keep your eyes (and ears) open for the future segments of this series as Deal and his team work through the many layers of research and legal briefs, hopefully to sort out the legal entanglements and set the record straight. Guest: David Deal Photograph © Mike Disfarmer All photos in this carousel © Mike Disfarmer Previous Pause Next Mike Disfarmer Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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