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Posted 05/25/2018
What makes a photographer follow their moral compass and photograph the stories they feel need to be told, no matter what the personal costs? Furthermore, how do they do so without the support of a news outlet or even an agency to distribute that work? And then, what if they decide to shoot primarily with black-and-white film?! On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Greg Constantine, who made and continues to make these decisions. In this affable conversation, we find out what prompted Constantine to pick up a camera and how he made the subject of “statelessness” a recurring theme in his work. We also learn why he continued to shoot film, even after digital became the more affordable and accepted format, and why the more established route of assignments for news outlets was not the best path for his storytelling. We also discuss the financing of his work through a combination of grants, commissions, and out-of-pocket spending, the obstacles to exhibiting documentary photography and, ultimately, the satisfaction of seeing the positive impact his work has had. As mentioned, much of Constantine’s work documents oppressed communities, and he has lived and traveled extensively in Asia and, more recently in Europe, to follow stories of migration and persecution. Specifically, he has worked in Burma with the Rohingya people, with the Nubians in Kenya, and with communities around the world that live without the basic right of citizenship. His current project, Seven Doors, has brought him back to his home country to document stories on immigration detention. Constantine’s work ultimately did make it into well-recognized newspapers. He has published books and won awards, and his work has been exhibited in the halls of the U.S. Capitol Building, but he continues to press forward—guided not by credit lines, but by the desire to grow as a photographer, to be inspired by the people he photographs, and to tell the stories that demand to be told. Join us for this inspiring conversation. Guest: Greg Constantine Kenya, 2008, from “Nowhere People” © Greg Constantine Kuwait, 2011, from “Nowhere People” © Greg Constantine Italy, 2014, from “Nowhere People” © Greg Constantine Iraq, 2014, from “Nowhere People” © Greg Constantine Bangladesh, 2017, from “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” © Greg Constantine Bangladesh, 2017, from “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” © Greg Constantine Bangladesh, 2017, from “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” © Greg Constantine Bangladesh, 2017, from “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” © Greg Constantine United States, 2018, from “Seven Doors” © Greg Constantine United States, 2018, from “Seven Doors” © Greg Constantine United States, 2018, from “Seven Doors” © Greg Constantine Malaysia, 2017, from “Seven Doors” © Greg Constantine Greg Constantine on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Allan Weitz and Greg Constantine © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/05/2018
What a start to the New Year for the B&H Photography Podcast. We are incredibly fortunate to kick off our year with photographer Cig Harvey and gallerist Caroline Wall, director of the Robert Mann Gallery. In conjunction with her new book, You an Orchestra, You a Bomb, Harvey is currently exhibiting at the Robert Mann Gallery, and we were able to speak with artist and gallerist to discuss the making of her latest portfolio and the collaborative process of exhibition. This is Cig Harvey’s third monograph and, in addition to her photographic creativity, she is also very articulate when describing her artistic process and techniques. This is a true benefit to us at the podcast. Her description of the “gasp” moments that she seeks when working, whether they be gasps of fear or in the presence of beauty, was a wonderful moment in our interview. The titular mantra that describes part of her process is something that we will keep with us as we advance in our own photographic journey. Join us as we talk with Harvey and Wall about how an idea becomes a series, how editing can be a physical act, and the two distinct ways she approached imaging for this most recent series. We also discuss the role that a gallery—in this case through the eyes of a trusted collaborator—plays in the editing of a body of work and, ultimately, its exhibition and sale. The exhibit, Cig Harvey—You an Orchestra, You a Bomb, is on display at the Robert Mann Gallery through January 27, 2018 and, on that date, Ms. Harvey will be present for an artist’s talk. Her book of the same name is available wherever you find fine books and, specifically, here. Guests: Cig Harvey and Caroline Wall Birds of New England, Rockport, Maine, 2016 © Cig Harvey, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Wild Orchid, Lincolnville, Maine, 2017 © Cig Harvey, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Magnolia Tree, Rockport, Maine, 2017 © Cig Harvey, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Sky Lantern, 2017 © Cig Harvey, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Sparks, Lake Meguntacook, Maine, 2016 © Cig Harvey, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Blizzard on Main Street, 2017 © Cig Harvey, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Prism, Rockport, Maine, 2017 © Cig Harvey, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Lips, Faith, Rockport, Maine, 2017 © Cig Harvey, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Scout in the Blizzard, Rockport, Maine, 2017 © Cig Harvey, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Scout with Reflections, Rockport, Maine, 2016 © Cig Harvey, Courtesy Robert Mann Gallery Caroline Wall and Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/27/2017
Bird photography is a big deal around B&H, and we’re not just talking about the lenses needed to get those wonderful close-ups of warblers, herons, gulls, and raptors. Bird photography is a passion that grabs pros and amateurs alike and seems to not let go; there are very few photographers as dedicated to their craft (and gear) as bird photographers. We are fortunate to have two photographers with us to discuss the gear, technique, and protocols necessary to capture pleasing images of our feathered friends. David Speiser is a member of the Board of Directors of New York City Audubon and has been an avid bird photographer for more than twenty years. He has an incredible body of work that includes birds of all varieties, and brings not only technical excellence to his photographs, but a birder’s meticulousness to his archive. Klemens Gasser is a visual artist who became enthralled with birding several years ago and turned his fixation into an exhibit of bird photographs enlarged to 72 inches across. He brings an artist’s spirit to his bird photography and humor to our discussion, and clearly loves the thrill of the chase. We speak with these two photographers about the gear and apps they use, their shooting styles, favorite locations, and how digital technology has transformed bird photography. Join us for some very practical advice and a fun conversation. Guests: David Speiser and Klemens Gasser Baltimore oriole, photograph © David Speiser Blackburnian warbler, photograph © David Speiser Canada warbler, photograph © David Speiser Great gray owl, photograph © David Speiser Prairie warbler, photograph © David Speiser Red-shouldered hawk, photograph © David Speiser Red-tailed hawk, photograph © David Speiser Snowy owl, photograph © David Speiser Spruce grouse, photograph © David Speiser Upland sandpiper, photograph © David Speiser Common grackle, photograph © Klemens Gasser American bittern, photograph © Klemens Gasser Snowy owl I, photograph © Klemens Gasser Glaucous gull, photograph © Klemens Gasser Saltmarsh sparrow, photograph © Klemens Gasser Franklin’s gull, photograph © Klemens Gasser Painted bunting, photograph © Klemens Gasser Snowy owl II, photograph © Klemens Gasser Snowy owl III, photograph © Klemens Gasser Klemens Gasser, Allan Weitz, David Speiser, photograph © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/04/2017
Steve Simon is The Passionate Photographer, and in the short conversation we had with him at the 2017 OPTIC Conference, it became clear why. Not only does he exude a passion for photography (and for cameras) but his photographs are imbued with humanity, humor, a wonderful sense of composition, and his talent for capturing the decisive moment. Whether it is street photography, long-form documentary or his wonderful news coverage of presidential campaigns and conventions, his passion is on display. We talk with Simon about a range of subjects, including his first cameras, his popular workshops, and what motivates him to keep shooting. After a break, we return with the fifth installment of our series “Dispatch with Adriane Ohanesian.” In this segment, she recounts her harrowing story of coming under attack while photographing a story on illegal gold mining in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Ohanesian is an award-winning photojournalist, based in Kenya, who covers humanitarian crisis and conflict in South Sudan and Somalia. On this assignment, she had hiked deep into the Okapi Wildlife Reserve with rangers returning to a gold mine that had been cleared of illegal mining, only to be attacked by militia members looking to reclaim their site. Her incredible story involves hiding overnight in a mine pit within earshot of her attackers, fleeing barefoot through the jungle, only to get lost and returned to the mine she had hoped to escape. Join us for this bracing episode, which demonstrates what passionate photographers will do to tell a story worth telling.  Click here  if you missed Episode 4 of “Dispatch.” Guests: Steve Simon and Adriane Ohanesian Photojournalist Adriane Ohanesian at work in the Okapi Wildlife Reserve Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Photograph © Steve Simon Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/28/2017
If inspiration is what you are looking for, the story of how Eric Kruszewski became a photographer should supply you with plenty of it. Of course, it all starts with a personal desire but, planning, networking, hard work, and even a simple Google search like the eponymic one above, all go into the recipe for success. Photographs © Eric Kruszewski Taking up photography as a hobby in your thirties seems a commonplace occurrence, but deciding to change careers and become a working photographer is another story altogether. Join us as we speak with travel, editorial, and documentary photographer Eric Kruszewski about his journey from newbie to National Geographic. We talk about the value of workshops, mentors, cold calls, and persistence, and trace Eric’s career from its inauspicious beginnings through long-term personal projects, one-off jobs, artistic setbacks, learning new skills and, ultimately, a satisfying career—paying the bills by doing what he loves. Guest: Eric Kruszewski At India’s Jaisalmer Fort, a street performer walks a tightrope in a unique way—on her knees (with a metal plate) while pushing herself along only with her toes and balancing a vase of water on her head. Cowboys from across America gather at the Pendleton Roundup to prepare for its annual rodeo. From the series, “American Rodeo.” It is quite common that families travel together with the Davis Carnival. In camp, one woman observes her neighbors—a mother and daughter—through the window. From the series, “Behind the Ferris Wheel.” Richmond Shepard, a mime based in New York City, poses for a portrait in his studio. During the annual Military Tattoo in Edinburgh, Scotland, a motorcycle stunt driver takes off amongst fireworks. The performance is held for about three weeks, with the Edinburgh Castle as a backdrop. A woman walks through a mirror maze, part of the Camera Obscura and World of Illusions exhibits in Edinburgh's Old Town. Chris Turner poses for a portrait in his childhood neighborhood of Northeast Washington, D.C. Chris was one of several people accused of the murder of Catherine Fuller in 1984. He served 26 years in prison and maintains his innocence. At the Elephant Conservation Center in Laos, a mahout (elephant trainer) jumps between two elephants. He stuck the landing. Andreas Georgiou, a Greek economist, poses for a portrait in his United States home A young girl dons a costume inside the Angkor Wat Temple in Cambodia. She dresses in costume to pose for photos with visitors. Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/25/2017
I don’t think I’ve ever seen Allan Weitz as happy as he was during our recording of this episode and, if you are into vintage cameras, lenses, and all things film photography, just sit back and enjoy our conversation with Bellamy Hunt, aka the Japan Camera Hunter. The palpable enthusiasm between these two camera lovers cannot be feigned, and they talked like old friends about Nikon SP, Canon rangefinders, Hasselblads, and anything with a red dot. We also learn how an Englishman arrived in Japan, worked for a camera company, became a camera hunter, and eventually developed a business that not only sources vintage and rare cameras, but sells film, custom-paints cameras, and writes and shares his love for photography on his the “JCH” site. In addition to talking about cameras, we discuss the photography culture of Japan, camera shops of Tokyo, and the renaissance of film photography. Join us for this pleasurable conversation. Guest: Bellamy Hunt Custom-painted Canon 7 rangefinder camera with Canon 50mm f0.95 lens Hasselblad Gold-plated 50th Anniversary 503CX with Zeiss 80mm f/2.8 Planar T* lens Black Leica M2 with a Leicavit MP and a 35mm f/2 Summicron-M Black Leica MP 6 with 35mm f/1.4 Summilux-M (Hunt’s personal camera) Black Contax G2 with 16mm f/8 Zeiss Hologon T* Black Rollei 35S with 40mm f/2.8 Rollei-HFT lens and rolls of JCH Street Pan 400 film Allan Weitz and Bellamy Hunt Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/07/2017
We return to OPTIC 2017 this week for two wonderful conversations with photographers who ply their trade on the road. First, we speak with Jonathan Irish, who, along with his partner, Stefanie Payne, spent 2016 crisscrossing the country in an Airstream trailer on an epic quest to photograph all 59 U.S. National Parks. They succeeded, and have branded their adventure The Greatest American Roadtrip. Irish discusses the planning it took to reach all of the parks, dividing the workload, the sponsorship they received, and the photographic aspect of the journey, trying to capture the legendary landmarks, as well as the off-the-beaten-path locales of each park. Jillian Mann and Kyla Trethewey are Our Wild Abandon and they, too, cruise the country in a trailer, but their journey started four years ago and has no end point—yet. Like most great road trips, theirs started with a need to just get away (from their native Vancouver) and, as often goes, they suffered early setbacks, including a roll-over accident and visa complications. They persisted and not only have documented their experiences, but have developed successful photo careers along the way. Their journey was not initially a photographic exercise, but we speak with them about how their Instagram feed grew and became a method to raise funds, eventually including branded content, and how they made the transition to commissioned assignments and agency representation, while still living on the road. After a break, we continue with our serial, “Dispatch,” with Adriane Ohanesian. Ohanesian discusses her attempt to return to South Sudan, new approaches to fund long-terms stories that surpass “most horrific image competitions,” assignments in Nairobi and Congo, and an update on the plight of four-year-old Mohamed, who is stuck in Kenya, trying to reunite with his mother in the United States. Guests: Jonathan Irish, Jillian Mann, Kyla Trethewey and Adriane Ohanesian Click here if you missed Episode 2 of “Dispatch.” Badlands National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Death Valley National Park, Photograph by Stefanie Payne Saguaro National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Grand Canyon National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Grand Canyon National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Redwoods National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Glacier Bay National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Joshua Tree National Park, Photograph by Jonathan Irish Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Photograph by Our Wild Abandon Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/12/2017
A simple twist of fate (OK, I clicked a link) introduced me to the wedding photography of Jide Alakija and I immediately knew he should be a guest on the podcast. His work falls into the category of documentary wedding photography, but the intimate connection he seems to make with his subjects, as well as his compositional skills, place his work above the popular trend of fly-on-the-wall work. He captures moments of humor, tenderness, and joy that many photographers would miss, but still fills a frame the way Grandma wants the photos on her mantel to look. We talk about his composition decisions and shooting techniques, but we also wanted him on the show because his work brings him to many different countries and cultures. With this in mind, we take on numerous aspects of traveling to shoot a wedding, whether that is a "destination" wedding or simply being invited to shoot a wedding far from home. Our conversation includes the practical side of travel—what gear to bring, who to hire as an assistant, how to budget—but we also discuss the intricacies of working in a locale where you are not familiar with the cultural traditions and may not even speak the language. Join us for a lively chat with our new friend, Jide Alakija. Guest: Jide Alakija Jide Alakija and Allan Weitz Previous Pause Next All Photographs by Jide Alakija DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 04/28/2017
We start this week’s episode on a congenial note with Frank Meo, aka “ The PhotoCloser,” talking about what can be a very difficult aspect of photography for some—negotiating with clients and establishing a rate for your services. Meo, who has been a “rep” for many photographers, now concentrates on being a “collaborator.” His services include estimating and negotiating fees. Meo also speaks on the subject at many conferences and workshops, and he offers brainstorming sessions designed to empower, motivate, and inspire. On our show, he discusses business practices that will garner “clients for life,” and offers a few ideas on what you should consider when charging for your services. After a break, we take a dramatic turn and present the first segment of our serial, “Dispatch.” We begin this series with photojournalist Adriane Ohanesian, who introduces us to her work, discusses her life as a freelancer based in Nairobi, Kenya, and prepares us for her upcoming assignment in Somalia. Once a month, Ohanesian will offer us insight into the working life of a photographer in conflict zones. Since 2010, Adriane Ohanesian has covered crises in South Sudan, Darfur, and Somalia, and has been recognized as one of Magnum Photo’s top “30 under 30.” She has also received LensCulture’s Emerging Talent award. In 2016, she won a World Press Photo award for her work in Darfur, and the Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award. This year Ohanesian was selected as one of PDN’s 30 new and emerging photographers. Guests: Frank Meo and Adriane Ohanesian Kaltumo Rukow Gulie, age 29, holds the phone as Mohamed Abdi Bare, age 4, speaks to his mother Amina from Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya, January, 2017. Mohamed Abdi Bare, age 4, stares at the line of people inside the waiting area at the Department of Refugee Affairs office in Shauri Moyo, Nairobi, Kenya, January, 2017. Women and children shelter themselves from the rain at the Mahama Refugee Camp in Rwanda, May, 2015. The shelters of nearly 400 pastoralists families who have lost a majority of their livestock due to drought, have set up camp along the road in search of food and water in Uusgure, Puntland, northern Somalia, February, 2017. Members of the rebel group the Sudan Liberation Army (SLA-AW), ride on top of a pickup truck inside of their territory in North Darfur, Sudan, March, 2015. Chichia, age 10, recovers in a make-shift clinic where her right arm was amputated after the Sudanese government bombed her family’s home in Tabanya, South Kordofan, Sudan, May, 2016. The Meth Project Campaign, photograph by Ron Haviv. Image courtesy Frank Meo/The PhotoCloser Frank Meo and Allan Weitz © John R Harris Previous Pause Next Adriane Ohanesian unless otherwise noted DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 04/07/2017
Conservation photography can take many forms, and we will offer our definition, but more importantly, we will speak with noted outdoor photographer Art Wolfe about his definition of the term. After “Al’s Gearhead Pick of the Week,” we are joined by Mr. Wolfe for a segment in which we discuss how he produces beautiful images in the service of a greater cause. Wolfe is currently working on a project on African elephants and the critical need to safeguard their existence. From this topic, the conversation easily flows to the funding of expeditions through workshops and book deals to the work of other photographers promoting awareness on a global scale and photographers tackling local issues of concern to them. Above Photograph © Art Wolfe After a break, we are joined by David Brommer, director of OPTIC 2017-Outdoor, Photo/Video, Travel Imaging Conference, who will give us a preview of this year’s event, held June 4-7, in New York City. The theme of this year’s conference is conservation and the environment, so it is fitting that we pair him with Art Wolfe; however, the photographers who present at OPTIC represent a wide range of styles and concerns, and the topics discussed range from the aesthetic to the technical to the practical. Brommer provides us with a sense of the breadth of this photographic talent, as well as the manufacturers who will attend and festoon their booths with gear for everyone to try. Guests: Art Wolfe and David Brommer African Elephants, Savuti Marsh, Chobe National Park, Botswana: I was in a small boat as these elephants crossed the channel and hauled themselves out dark and slick with water. What I really like about this image is the implied African Elephants, Okavango Delta, Botswana: I set up by a shallow pond and was able to position the camera in a way to capture the width of the landscape Humpback Whale, Vava'u, Tonga: Tonga is one of the very few places you can actually snorkel within close proximity to whales. We had just five days on the water and four of them were just too windy and the whales were very shy. In a more outgoing moment, a whale swam by and eyeballed me. It was extraordinary. Puma, Torres del Paine National Park, Chile. African Elephant, Okavango Delta, Botswana: An African elephant's tusks are used for defense, digging for roots, stripping bark, and fighting during mating season. Previous Pause Next Art Wolfe DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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